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Does anyone know a c/c++ code for finding the network interfaces available? I've been looking for some codes, but most times the're quite complex. Is there a simple way to do this?

UPDATE

On Ubuntu/Linux

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2  
On what platform? – Oliver Charlesworth Dec 8 '11 at 17:20
1  
look at the ifconfig source for linux? Or, the opensource versions of ethereal? – KevinDTimm Dec 8 '11 at 17:24
    
Unbutu/Linux. I'm new on this, and I've been looking for some codes, on the internet, but some of then are bit hard to understand. – Filipe Dec 8 '11 at 17:25
    
Thank's i'll try this. – Filipe Dec 8 '11 at 17:28
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to give you an idea of the system calls needed, run netstat under strace as suggested in this answer. – Sam Miller Dec 8 '11 at 17:30
up vote 15 down vote accepted

See the getifaddrs man page. There is an example program towards the end.

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If you're looking for this in context of a desktop application, and you want to be notified of changes (e.g. interfaces connecting/disconnecting), consider using DBus to monitor NetworkManager.

http://projects.gnome.org/NetworkManager/developers/api/09/spec.html

You can enumerate interfaces, as well as interface-specific things (like available and connected WiFi access points, configured-but-not-dialed PPP links, and so forth), and if anything changes, you'll receive a notification over the DBus.

(If this is for something more like a server program, where you expect the network configuration to remain more stable, then things like getifaddrs are possibly more appropriate.)

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