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JavaScript 1.8.5 (ECMAScript 5) adds some interesting methods that prevent future modifications of a passed object, with varying degrees of thoroughness:

Presumably the main point of these is to catch mistakes: if you know that you don't want to modify an object after a certain point, you can lock it down so that an error will be thrown if you inadvertently try to modify it later. (Providing you've done "use strict"; that is.)

My question: in modern JS engines such as V8, is there any performance benefit (eg, faster property look-ups, reduced memory footprint) in locking down objects using the above methods?

(See also John Resig's nice explanation – doesn't mention performance, though.)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

In Google Chrome (so V8, that is), a frozen object iterates 98% slower than a regular object.

http://jsperf.com/performance-frozen-object

Test name*              ops/sec

non-frozen object    32,193,471
frozen object           592,726

Probably this is because those functions are relatively new and probably not optimized yet (but that's just my guess, I honestly don't know the reason).

Anyhow, I really do not recommed using it for performance benefits, as that apparently does not make sense.


* The code for the test is:

var o1 = {a: 1};
var o2 = {a: 1};

Object.freeze(o2);

Test 1 (non-frozen object):

for(var key in o1);

Test 2 (frozen object):

for(var key in o2);
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2  
This sounds like a V8 bug rather then something that's not optimised. Note Object.keys is only 72% slower –  Raynos Dec 8 '11 at 17:55
2  
@Raynos: Good point; also Object.keys should not be slower. I agree it's more like a bug since frozing should not be a performance hit; rather the opposite. –  pimvdb Dec 8 '11 at 17:57
1  
prototype lookups in the prototype are also 94% slower :\ –  Raynos Dec 8 '11 at 17:58
2  
Interesting find. I checked other browsers — nightly FF, WebKit, Opera and none of them have such crazy slow down (see jsperf). Definitely looks like a bug. I filed an issue in V8 tracker — code.google.com/p/v8/issues/detail?id=1858 –  kangax Dec 9 '11 at 4:58
4  
Now (in Chrome 34 and in the year 2014 that is) the iteration of a frozen object seems to iterates around 24 percent faster. –  msung Apr 18 at 13:46

In theory freezing an object allows you to make stronger guarantees about the shape of an object.

This means the VM can compact the memory size.

It means the VM can optimize property lookups in the prototype chain.

It means any live references just became not live because the object cannot change anymore.

In practice JavaScript engines do not make these aggressive optimization yet.

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1  
In practice in most engines there's little to be gained from a memory point of view for any given object. Equally, property lookups from prototypes are already cached (performance of most built-ins would be terrible if it weren't). –  gsnedders Dec 8 '11 at 19:06
    
@gsnedders still there should be non-zero gain, right? –  Raynos Dec 8 '11 at 20:09
    
Right. You should be able to have more than just an inline cache, as you can inline the entire read as you have a known value. –  gsnedders Dec 8 '11 at 21:11
    
(Note that inlining will only gain a certain amount: you don't want to inline strings, for example, though inlining integers/doubles is something you do want to do.) –  gsnedders Dec 9 '11 at 19:09

With Chrome 34 a frozen object performs slightly better than a non-frozen one in @pimvdb's test case (results below). The difference, however doesn't seem to be large enough to justify using this technique for performance benefits.

http://jsperf.com/performance-frozen-object

Testing in Chrome 34.0.1847.116 on OS X 10.9.2
----------------------------------------------
Test               Ops/sec
non-frozen object  105,250,353  ±0.41%  3% slower
frozen object      108,188,527  ±0.55%  fastest

Running @kangax's test cases shows that both versions of the object perform pretty much the same:

http://jsperf.com/performance-frozen-object-prop-access

Testing in Chrome 34.0.1847.116 on OS X 10.9.2
----------------------------------------------
Test               Ops/sec
non-frozen object  832,133,923  ±0.26%  fastest
frozen object      832,501,726  ±0.28%  fastest

http://jsperf.com/http-jsperf-com-performance-frozen-object-instanceof

Testing in Chrome 34.0.1847.116 on OS X 10.9.2
----------------------------------------------
Test               Ops/sec
non-frozen object  378,464,917  ±0.42%  fastest
frozen object      378,705,082  ±0.24%  fastest
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The only reason I see for those methods in production code is, that you can have sealed or frozen objects, for integrity purposes.

For instance, I write a little library, which works just great and offers you a set of methods in an object, but I don't want to you to change or overwrite any of my properties or methods. I'm not saying I can prevent you from doing that, but I can try to prevent you do it by accident which maybe is more important.

Also, those methods are easy to 'shim' in environment which doen't know about them, by just returning the original object. Of course it would have no effect then.

I don't see any performance related reasons to do this.

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1  
integrity purposes are for development –  Raynos Dec 8 '11 at 17:52
    
@Raynos: I see the purpose for librarys anyway. As I said, more likely to protect objects integritys from unwished changes. –  jAndy Dec 8 '11 at 19:35

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