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I am writing a perl program to extract lines that are in between the two patterns i am matching. for example the below text file has 6 lines. I am matching load balancer and end. I want to get the 4 lines that are in between.

**load balancer** 
new 
old
good
bad
**end**

My question is how do you extract lines in between load balancer and end into an array. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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Did you mean that ** should be in the actual input file, or is that a formatting mistake? –  TLP Dec 8 '11 at 18:47
    
People don't know how fast SO users reply to their questions. =) –  TLP Dec 8 '11 at 18:53
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the flip-flop operator.

# Define the marker regexes separately, cuz they're ugly and it's easier
# to read them outside the logic of the loop.
my $start_marker = qr{^ \s* \*\*load balancer\*\* \s* $}x;
my $end_marker   = qr{^ \s* \*\*end\*\* \s* $}x;

while( <DATA> ) {
    # False until the first regex is true.
    # Then it's true until the second regex is true.
    next unless /$start_marker/ .. /$end_marker/;

    # Flip-flop likes to work with $_, but it's bad form to
    # continue to use $_
    my $line = $_;

    print $line;
}

__END__
foo
bar
**load balancer** 
new 
old
good
bad
**end**
baz
biff
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I think the ** was actually Markup that was unintentionally included by using the code formatting. –  TLP Dec 8 '11 at 18:43
    
@TLP Left as an exercise for the reader. Let's call it cut & paste defense. :) –  Schwern Dec 8 '11 at 18:45
    
@TLP: you are right. I was trying to format the charecters to bold and it happened like that. sorry.!! –  abhiram potluri Dec 8 '11 at 21:38
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You can use the flip-flop operator to tell you when you are between the markers. It will also include the actual markers, so you'll need to except them from the data collection.

Note that this will mash together all the records if you have several, so if you do you need to store and reset @array somehow.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @array;
while (<DATA>) {
    if (/^load balancer$/ .. /^end$/) {
        push @array, $_ unless /^(load balancer|end)$/;
    }
}

print @array;

__DATA__
load balancer
new 
old
good
bad
end
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Sweet, didnt know you can use the flip flip op like this. –  snoofkin Dec 8 '11 at 19:55
    
awesome.. thank you so much TLP. that really helped! –  abhiram potluri Dec 8 '11 at 21:37
    
@abhirampotluri You're welcome. If you feel this answered your question, click the check mark (to the left) to mark it as correct. –  TLP Dec 8 '11 at 21:44
    
@abhirampotluri Is there a reason you chose not to accept my answer, and instead chose a lower rated answer that came in after mine, which does not save the result into an array? I noted that you first accepted mine, then changed your mind. –  TLP Dec 10 '11 at 1:22
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If you prefer a command line variation:

perl -ne 'print if m{\*load balancer\*}..m{\*end\*} and !m{\*load|\*end}' file
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this is command line. it still works though. thanks Ferguson –  abhiram potluri Dec 8 '11 at 21:39
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For files like this, I often use a change in the Record Separator ( $/ or $RS from English )

use English qw<$RS>;
local $RS = "\nend\n";

my $record = <$open_handle>;

When you chomp it, you get rid of that line.

chomp( $record );
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