Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose: I have 2 actions(action names = A, B) & 2 views, one view for each action.

View for Action "A" looks like below

@*codes*@
    @Html.Action("B")    
    @*calling action 'B' to render its content from view of action'A'*@
@*more codes*@

Now my question is DOES asking content of Action "B" from view of Action "A" makes 2 requests to web-server one from user(who requested content of action A) and internal request by server to itself (or something like that). Or may be something i need to make sure as far as performance is considered while a calling an action from a view.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Yes, the controller is initialized and the action called bit it is executed in the same context. But there is not a 2nd http request with all the network overhead that is implied.

There definitely could be some performance drawbacks to executing things this way but it really do some profiling to see how much damage is caused.

share|improve this answer

Any time you render an action from a view via Html.Action() or Html.RenderAction() you are creating a completely new request to the server to MVC which in turns invokes (most of) the default request pipeline. While it is not an additional web request being made, it is still somewhat costly.

Considerations have been made by the MVC team to reduce the overhead of 'child action requests' when compared to a standard request, but it is still 2 separate executions of the MVC pipeline.

Yes, there is a signficant difference in performance of RenderAction (slower) vs. RenderPartial (faster). RenderAction, by definition, has to run the whole ASP.NET pipeline to handle what appears to the system to be a new HTTP request, whereas RenderPartial is just adding extra content to an existing view.

-Brad Wilson, Senior developer on the ASP.NET MVC team

(source)

share|improve this answer
    
Have you got a citation to back that up? Doesn't sound right to me... –  Charlino Dec 8 '11 at 19:32
    
I surely do! Please see my edit. –  Nathan Taylor Dec 9 '11 at 14:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.