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What is the basics algorithm for testing if a tree is symmetrical. Because it is a binary tree, I would assume that it would be a recursive definition of sorts

The formal question is below:

A binary tree is a mirror image of itself if its left and right subtrees are identical mirror images i.e., the binary tree is symmetrical. This is best explained with a few examples.

  1
 / \
2   2

TRUE

   1
  / \
 2   2
  \
   3

FALSE

     1
   /   \
  2     2
 / \   / \
4   3 3   4

TRUE

       1
     /   \
    2     2 
   / \   / \
  3   4 3   4

FALSE

       1
     /   \
    2     2
   /       \
  3         3

TRUE

In a programming language of choice, define a BTree class/C struct and an associated method to check if the tree is a mirror image. For statically typed languages, you can assume that node values are all integers.

Class/structure definition
BTree {
  BTree left;
  BTree right;
  int value;
}

Assume that the root of the tree is tracked by caller and function isMirror() is invoked on it.

Also, if defining a class, make sure to provide a no-argument constructor and getter/setter methods if data elements are not publicly accessible.

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8 Answers 8

How about calling mirrorEquals(root.left, root.right) on the following function :-

boolean mirrorEquals(BTree left, BTree right) {
  if (left == null || right == null) return left == null && right == null;
  return left.value == right.value && mirrorEquals(left.left, right.right) && mirrorEquals(left.right, right.left);
}

Basically compare the left subtree and inverted right subtree, drawing an imaginary line of inversion across root.

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You can replace both the second and the third conditionals with a single if (left == null || right == null) return false; –  chill Dec 8 '11 at 20:55
5  
No, you can't: if they are both null, you need to return true. –  comingstorm Dec 8 '11 at 23:46
17  
“To iterate is human, to recurse divine.” –  st0le Dec 9 '11 at 6:26
4  
this guy is genius considering how quickly he posted and how concise this is. –  user656925 Feb 9 '12 at 22:48
1  
After the if, you simply need: return left==right; –  D. L. Feb 28 '12 at 2:05

Solution 1 - Recursively:

bool isMirror(BinaryTreeNode *a, BinaryTreeNode *b)
{
    return (a && b) ?  
        (a->m_nValue==b->m_nValue 
        && isMirror(a->m_pLeft,b->m_pRight) 
        && isMirror(a->m_pRight,b->m_pLeft)) :  
    (a == b);
}
bool isMirrorItselfRecursively(BinaryTreeNode *root) 
{
    if (!root)
        return true;

    return isMirror(root->m_pLeft, root->m_pRight);
}

Solution 2 - Iteratively:

bool isMirrorItselfIteratively(BinaryTreeNode *root) 
{
    /// use single queue
    if(!root) return true;
    queue<BinaryTreeNode *> q;
    q.push(root->m_pLeft);
    q.push(root->m_pRight);
    BinaryTreeNode *l, *r;
    while(!q.empty()) {
        l = q.front();
        q.pop();
        r = q.front();
        q.pop();
        if(l==NULL && r==NULL) continue;
        if(l==NULL || r==NULL || l->m_nValue!=r->m_nValue) return false;
        q.push(l->m_pLeft);
        q.push(r->m_pRight);
        q.push(l->m_pRight);
        q.push(r->m_pLeft);
    }

    return true;
}
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The recursive solution from @gvijay is very clear, and here's an iterative solution.

Inspect each row of the tree from top to bottom and see if the values are a palindrome. If they all are then, yes, it's a mirror. You'll need to implement an algorithm to visit each row and include null values for sparse trees. In pseudocode:

boolean isMirror(BTree tree) {
  foreach (List<Integer> row : tree.rows() {
    if (row != row.reverse()) return false;
  }
  return true;
}

The trick is to design the algorithm to iterate the rows of a tree with consideration that sparse trees should have null values as place holders. This Java implementation seems ok:

public static boolean isMirror(BTree root) {
  List<BTree> thisRow, nextRow;
  thisRow = Arrays.asList(root);
  while (true) {
    // Return false if this row is not a palindrome.
    for (int i=0; i<thisRow.size()/2; i++) {
      BTree x = thisRow.get(i);
      BTree y = thisRow.get(thisRow.size()-i-1);
      if ((x!=null) && (y!=null)
          && (x.value != y.value))
        return false;
      if (((x==null) && (y!=null))
          || (x!=null) && (y==null))
        return false;
    }
    // Move on to the next row.
    nextRow = new ArrayList<BTree>();
    for (BTree tree : thisRow) {
      nextRow.add((tree==null) ? null : tree.lt);
      nextRow.add((tree==null) ? null : tree.rt);
    }
    boolean allNull = true;
    for (BTree tree : nextRow) {
      if (tree != null) allNull = false;
    }
    // If the row is all empty then we're done.
    if (allNull) return true;
    thisRow = nextRow;
  }
}
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Here is a C++ solution per gvijay

bool isMirrorTree(BTnode* LP, BTnode* RP)
{
    if (LP == NULL || RP == NULL) // if either is null check that both are NULL
    { 
        return ( LP == NULL && RP == NULL );
    } 
    // check that data is equal and then recurse
    return LP->data == RP->data && 
           isMirrorTree( LP->left, RP->right ) && 
           isMirrorTree( LP->right, RP->left );
}
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EDIT

As was pointed out in the comments, my first version of the algorithm failed for certain inputs. I'm not going to reinvent the wheel, I'll just provide a Python answer using @gvijay correct algorithm. First, a representation for the binary tree:

class BTree(object):
    def __init__(self, l, r, v):
        self.left  = l
        self.right = r
        self.value = v
    def is_mirror(self):
        return self._mirror_equals(self.left, self.right)
    def _mirror_equals(self, left, right):
        if left is None or right is None:
            return left is None and right is None
        return (left.value == right.value
                and self._mirror_equals(left.left, right.right)
                and self._mirror_equals(left.right, right.left))

I tested the above code using all the sample trees in the question and the trees which were returning incorrect results, as mentioned in the comments. Now the results are correct for all cases:

root1 = BTree(
    BTree(None, None, 2),
    BTree(None, None, 2),
    1)
root1.is_mirror() # True

root2 = BTree(
    BTree(None, BTree(None, None, 3), 2),
    BTree(None, None, 2),
    1)
root2.is_mirror() # False

root3 = BTree(
    BTree(
        BTree(None, None, 4),
        BTree(None, None, 3),
        2),
    BTree(
        BTree(None, None, 3),
        BTree(None, None, 4),
        2),
    1)
root3.is_mirror() # True

root4 = BTree(
    BTree(
        BTree(None, None, 3),
        BTree(None, None, 4),
        2),
    BTree(
        BTree(None, None, 3),
        BTree(None, None, 4),
        2),
    1)
root4.is_mirror() # False

root5 = BTree(
    BTree(BTree(None, None, 3), None, 2),
    BTree(None, BTree(None, None, 3), 2),
    1)
root5.is_mirror() # True

root6 = BTree(BTree(None, None, 1), None, 1)
root6.is_mirror() # False

root7 = BTree(BTree(BTree(None, None, 1), None, 2), None, 1)
root7.is_mirror() # False
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1  
Hmm, although this algorithm would falsely detect the following tree as a mirror BTree(BTree(None, None, 1), None, 1), or any other tree whose in-order value listing is a palindrome. e.g. BTree(BTree(BTree(None, None, 1), None, 2), None, 1). –  maerics Dec 9 '11 at 14:28
    
@maerics, you're right. Thanks for pointing that out; I've edited my answer. –  Óscar López Dec 10 '11 at 14:13

Slightly different approach.

How about do an inorder traversal of the binary tree storing all the contents in some data structure like a string/ array.

Once traversal is complete, check if the elements in your array form a palindrome. Not as efficient space wise (recursion takes O(log(n)), this method tales O(n)) but this will work as well.

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This doesn't work. Consider the tree who's level order traversal is {1,2,3,3,#,2,#} where # indicates a null value. –  adijo Jun 20 at 18:31

Recursive and Iterative solutions in Java using approaches discussed above

Recursive

public Boolean isSymmetric(TreeNode root) {
    if (root == null) {
        return true;
    }

    return isSymmetricInternal(root.left, root.right);
}

private Boolean isSymmetricInternal(TreeNode leftNode,
        TreeNode rightNode) {

    boolean result = false;

    // If both null then true
    if (leftNode == null && rightNode == null) {
        result = true;
    }

    if (leftNode != null && rightNode != null) {
        result = (leftNode.data == rightNode.data)
                && isSymmetricInternal(leftNode.left, rightNode.right)
                && isSymmetricInternal(leftNode.right, rightNode.left);
    }

    return result;
}

Iterative using LinkedList as a Queue

private Boolean isSymmetricRecursive(TreeNode root) {
    boolean result = false;

    if (root == null) {
        return= true;
    }

    Queue<TreeNode> queue = new LinkedList<>();
    queue.offer(root.left);
    queue.offer(root.right);

    while (!queue.isEmpty()) {
        TreeNode left = queue.poll();
        TreeNode right = queue.poll();

        if (left == null && right == null) {

            result = true;

        }
        else if (left == null || 
                right == null || 
                left.data != right.data) {
            // It is required to set result = false here
            result = false;
            break;
        }

        else if (left != null && right != null) {
            queue.offer(left.left);
            queue.offer(right.right);

            queue.offer(left.right);
            queue.offer(right.left);
        }
    }

    return result;
}

Test Case

    @Test
public void testTree() {

    TreeNode root0 = new TreeNode(1);
    assertTrue(isSymmetric(root0));
    assertTrue(isSymmetricRecursive(root0));

    TreeNode root1 = new TreeNode(1, new TreeNode(2), new TreeNode(2));
    assertTrue(isSymmetric(root1));
    assertTrue(isSymmetricRecursive(root1));

    TreeNode root2 = new TreeNode(1,
            new TreeNode(2, null, new TreeNode(3)), new TreeNode(2));
    assertFalse(isSymmetric(root2));
    assertFalse(isSymmetricRecursive(root2));

    TreeNode root3 = new TreeNode(1, new TreeNode(2, new TreeNode(4),
            new TreeNode(3)), new TreeNode(2, new TreeNode(3),
            new TreeNode(4)));
    assertTrue(isTreeSymmetric(root3));
    assertTrue(isSymmetricRecursive(root3));

    TreeNode root4 = new TreeNode(1, new TreeNode(2, new TreeNode(3),
            new TreeNode(4)), new TreeNode(2, new TreeNode(3),
            new TreeNode(4)));
    assertFalse(isSymmetric(root4));
    assertFalse(isSymmetricRecursive(root4));
}

Tree Node class

public class TreeNode {

int data;

public TreeNode left;
public TreeNode right;

public TreeNode(int data){
    this(data, null, null);
}

public TreeNode(int data, TreeNode left, TreeNode right)
{
    this.data = data;
    this.left = left;
    this.right = right;
}
}
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I'm not very experienced (just a year at corporate), but in my opinion, this can be solved by using S=recursion

For example:

MYTREECLASS B1= new MYTREECLASS();
MYTREECLASS B2= new MYTREECLASS();
B1= OriginalTree;
B2=OriginalTRee;
Boolean CHECK(MYTREECLASS, MYTREECLASS)
{
if (B1.Node = B2.Node)
then (
CHECK(B1.Left, B2.Right);
CHECK(B1.Right,B2.Left)
)
elseIf(b1.Left==null or b2.right...blah blah ,,)
return False)
else return False,

Return true if it matches.

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