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I'm trying to come up with two regexs to handle names (for an XSLT stylesheet). One that will handle the first name and possibly initial and one that will grab the last name.

Names will always be in this format + or minus the middle initial:

John Q. Smith: blah, blah. or Ann Smith: blah, blah.

Help?

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So, in English, the pattern is "One word starting with an upper-case; A space optionally followed by an upper-case letter and a period; a space and another word starting with an upper-case letter, ending in a colon." Correct? –  FakeRainBrigand Dec 8 '11 at 19:52
    
Yes. I can get the last name now with the substring-before() call in Xpath noted below. Still don't know how to handle the first. –  user1088443 Dec 8 '11 at 20:00
    
This doesn't just get the last name, it gets everything up to the colon including the last name. –  user1088443 Dec 8 '11 at 20:31
2  
This notion that people have a first name, a last name, and possibly a middle initial is nonsense. If you want to put people in pigeon holes and have their identity reduced to what a (badly-programmed) computer can handle, then just give them a number. –  Michael Kay Dec 8 '11 at 23:14
    
@MichaelKay: L O L :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 9 '11 at 5:40

4 Answers 4

This is possible in XPath 1.0 assuming:

  • You're willing to accept some rather horrific XPath expressions
  • Your format really, actually, completely follows the format you've described (see @FailedDev's answer and read "Falsehoods Programmers Believe About Names")

If you're OK with both of those, then here we go:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" method="text"/>
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <xsl:variable name="name" select="'  Ann: blah blah   '"/>
        <xsl:variable name="cname" 
                select="normalize-space(substring-before($name, ':'))"/>
        <xsl:variable name="after-first" 
                select="normalize-space(substring-after($cname, ' '))"/>
        <!-- first name -->
        [<xsl:value-of select="substring-before(concat($cname, ' '), ' ')"/>]
        <!-- middle name -->
        [<xsl:value-of select="concat(
            substring(substring-before($after-first, ' '), 1, 
                number(contains($after-first, ' ')) * 
                    string-length($after-first)),
            substring('', 1, 
                number(not(contains($after-first, ' '))) * 
                    string-length('')))"/>]
        <!-- last name -->
        [<xsl:value-of select="concat(
            substring(substring-after($after-first, ' '), 1, 
                number(contains($after-first, ' '))  * 
                    string-length($after-first)),
            substring($after-first, 1, 
                number(not(contains($after-first, ' '))) * 
                    string-length($after-first)))"/>]
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Using:

<xsl:variable name="name" select="'  Ann  Q. Smith : blah blah   '"/>

Output:

[Ann]
[Q.]
[Smith]

Using:

<xsl:variable name="name" select="'  Ann  Smith : blah blah   '"/>

Output:

[Ann]
[]
[Smith]

Using:

<xsl:variable name="name" select="'  Ann: blah blah   '"/>

Output:

[Ann]
[]
[]
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If you mean you want the part before the colon, you don't need a regex. Just call substring-before(). XSLT/XPath 2 only, though.

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Awesome, that gives me the last name. Now I need the first and possibly the initial! Thanks! –  user1088443 Dec 8 '11 at 19:59
    
Well, actually, this gives me the whole name string until the ":", I want the particular word before the colon. –  user1088443 Dec 8 '11 at 20:22

If you want the name string, split the string before and after the colon. Then you can split it by spaces. I.E. {John, Q., Smith} and {Ann, Smith}. The first element is always the first name, the last is always the last name, and if there are three elements, the second element is the initial.

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If you can get it to work without RegEx -- great. If not, here's a needle that seems to work for me.

([A-Z][a-z]+\s([A-Z]\.\s)?[A-Z][a-z]+):

Here's an example script in PHP.

<?php

$inp = "John Q. Smith: blah, blah. or Ann Smith: blah, blah.";
$needle = "/([A-Z][a-z]+\s([A-Z]\.\s)?[A-Z][a-z]+):/";

preg_match_all($needle, $inp, $matches, PREG_SET_ORDER);

foreach ($matches as $match) {
    echo "I found $match[1]";
    if (array_key_exists(2, $match)) 
        echo " with a middle name of $match[2]";
    echo "\n";
}

?>

It gives...

I found John Q. Smith with a middle name of Q.
I found Ann Smith

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