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I want to create a list of actions to perform on a drawing object. Here's what the non-generic code would look like:

private Dictionary<String, Action<Drawing, String>> actions = new Dictionary<String,  Action<Drawing, String>>();
private void LoadActions()
{
     actions.Add("Height", (d, s) => d.Height = Double.Parse(s));
     actions.Add("Width", (d, s) => d.Width = Double.Parse(s));
}
private void ProcessDrawing(Drawing drawing, String prop, String value)
{
     actions[prop](drawing, value);
}

The problem I have is that the Drawing class is a generic one (Drawing<T>) so I can't define actions like the following because T is not defined:

Dictionary<String, Action<Drawing<T>, String>> actions = new Dictionary<String,  Action<Drawing<T>, String>>();

Without caching the code looks like this:

private void ProcessDrawing<T>(Drawing<T> drawing, String prop, String value)
{
     var actions = new Dictionary<String, Action<Drawing<T>, String>>();
     actions.Add("Height", (d, s) => d.Height = Double.Parse(s));
     actions.Add("Width", (d, s) => d.Width = Double.Parse(s));
     actions[prop](drawing, value);
}

So how can I cache a bunch of actions accepting a generic type of parameter?

Thanks,

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The base class of all Actions is MulticastDelegate. You would have to define your dict as Dictionary<String,MulticastDelegate> and use appropriate castings after retrieving your actions from the dict.

EDIT: Tests show that lambda expressions can obviously not be directly assigned to variables of type MulticastDelegate. This is because the type of the lambda expression parameters is inferred from the type of the variable (or method parameter) it is assigned to. Therefore assign it first to a variable with the right Action<> type. Then assign this to MulticastDelegate.

In the example, I show both versions (through a method parameter and through a variable):

public static void CallTestDelegate()
{
    TestDelegate((d, s) => d.Height = Single.Parse(s));
}

public static void TestDelegate(Action<RectangleF, string> action)
{
    Dictionary<String, MulticastDelegate> dict = new Dictionary<string, MulticastDelegate>();
    dict.Add("a1", action);
    Action<RectangleF, string> action2 = (d, s) => d.Width = Single.Parse(s);
    dict.Add("a2", action2);

    var a1 = (Action<RectangleF, string>)dict["a1"];
    a1(new RectangleF(), "15");
}
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Could you provide an example? I'm getting the following error when I try to populate the actions: Cannot convert lambda expression to type 'System.MulticastDelegate' because it is not a delegate type. I'm also getting an error when I perform a check on the actions: actions.TryGetValue(prop, out action) –  Manuel Dec 8 '11 at 21:21
    
I added an example. I also tested, if an anonymous delegate could, unlike lambdas, be passed directly to the Add() method. But here again the same problem. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 9 '11 at 12:39

One option is to make Drawing<T> derive from a non-generic interface IDrawing that has Height and Width properties, then change your actions to be of type Action<IDrawing,String>.

Another option (less type-safe) is to make your actions of type Action<dynamic,String>.

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Option 1 would require too much work (if it can be done at all), I used a simplified example to show what my goal is. Can't use option 2 because the code has to be compatible with 3.5 –  Manuel Dec 8 '11 at 21:18
    
@Manuel: Fair enough, though it does help to have the context of the question when answering the question. I've edited the tags appropriately as far as the .NET 3.5 requirement goes. –  Stuart Golodetz Dec 9 '11 at 0:33

T is just a placeholder, make an abstract class or interface representing objects that you want

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