Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have:

public class BaseStationFrame1 extends JFrame
{

    JButton activateButton;
    JButton deactivateButton;
    BaseStation bs;

    JTextField networkIdField;
    JTextField portField;



    public BaseStationFrame1(BaseStation _bs){

        bs = _bs;

        setTitle("Base Station");
        setSize(600,500); 
        setLocation(100,200);  
        setVisible(true);

        activateButton = new JButton("Activate");
        deactivateButton = new JButton("Deactivate");
        Container content = this.getContentPane();
        content.setBackground(Color.white);
        content.setLayout(new FlowLayout()); 
        content.add(activateButton);
        content.add(deactivateButton);

        networkIdField = new JTextField("networkId : "+ bs.getNetworkId());
        networkIdField.setEditable(false);

        content.add(networkIdField);

        portField = new JTextField("portId : "+ bs.getPort());
        portField.setEditable(false);

        content.add(portField);}
    }

My problem is that i don't want the two TextFields to appear on the right of Activate and Deactivate buttons but below them. How can i fix that?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Specify your layout manager, like this:

content.setLayout(new GridLayout(2,2));

That would use the Grid Layout Manager to establish a grid with 2 columns and 2 rows, that your components would then be placed in.

The layout manager you are currently using, FlowLayout, only adds contents onto the end of the current row. it will wrap around once it reaches the constrained edge of the pane, though. You should also check the other layout managers here

You could alternatively use GridBagLayout , but you will have to specify a GridBagConstraints object you then add alongside the individual elements, like so:

content.add(networkIdField, gridConstraints);

see more on that in the linked tutorial.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 GridLayout also nests nicely, as shown here. –  trashgod Dec 9 '11 at 1:43
add comment

can I suggest that you use a Null Layout for the parent component?

setLayout(null);

then use a setBounds(xPos,yPos, Width, Height);

to position the components on the panel etc?

Doing this will prevent Java's UI Manager to manage the components to the Frame, Panel etc.

That seems to be the easiest and less painful way.

Regards

share|improve this answer
    
-1 for null layout suggestion. Layout manages exist for a reason. –  camickr Dec 8 '11 at 20:52
    
Ok, thought it would be the easiest, then you can try GridBagLayout which will also require you to set rows and Columns to position the component. GridBagLayout. It might work, but with a lot of trouble. –  Theron084 Dec 8 '11 at 20:56
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.