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Is there any way to set a hash with keys such as < , >, %, + ect? I want to create a method that accepts an array of ints, and a hash with parameters. In the method below array is the array to be filtered,the hash is the parameters, the idea is that any number less then the value for min, or more then the value for max is removed

def range_filter(array, hash) 
  checker={min=> <, ,max => >} # this is NOT  working code, this the line I am curious about
  checker.each_key {|key| array.delete_if {|x| x checker[key] args[key] }
  array.each{|num| puts num}
end

The desired results would be

array=[1, 25, 15, 7, 50]
filter={min=> 10, max=> 30} 
range_filter(array, filter)
# => 25
# => 15

I think this question may be related but I am not sure: class method as hash value

Thank you very much.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In ruby, even math is a method invocation. And math symbols can by stored as ruby symbols. These lines are identical:

1 + 2         # 3
1.+(2)        # 3
1.send(:+, 2) # 3

So armed with that, storing it a has is simple:

op = { :method => :> }
puts 1.send(op[:method], 2) # false
puts 3.send(op[:method], 2) # true
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Would this also work with :!= in the place of :>? –  Btuman Dec 8 '11 at 21:28
    
!= is a special syntax case. It actually executes the == method, and then flips the resulting boolean. So you can't run != as a method directly sadly. You have to do !1.send(:==, 2). You may have to detect that symbol and special case it if you want to support this. –  Alex Wayne Dec 8 '11 at 21:40
    
I just tried it in my irb and it works for me. Ruby 1.9.2 –  iain Dec 8 '11 at 22:16
    
Sadly, I'm on 1.8.7 still. But I'm glad to hear they fixed that inconsistency then :) –  Alex Wayne Dec 8 '11 at 23:32
    
In Ruby 1.9, ! is also a method, so it would be more like 1.send(:==, 2).send(:!). –  Jörg W Mittag Dec 9 '11 at 3:27

sure, store them as strings (or symbols) and use object.send(function_name, argument)

> operators = ["<", ">", "%", "+"]
=> ["<", ">", "%", "+"] 
> operators.each{|op| puts ["   10 #{op} 3: ", 10.send(op,3)].join}
   10 < 3: false
   10 > 3: true
   10 % 3: 1
   10 + 3: 13
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This should work just like expected:

def range_filter(array, args)
  checker = { :min=> :<, :max => :> }
  checker.each_key { |key| array.delete_if {|x| x.send checker[key], args[key] } }
  array.each { |num| puts num }
end

Just use Symbols instead of the plain operators. The operators are special methods of number objects so you can just use send and their Symbol equivalent to call them dynamically.

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Guess using symbols doesn't add readability in this case. Try this:

checkers = 
  [ lambda{ |x| x > 10 },
    lambda{ |x| x < 30 } ]

[1, 25, 15, 7, 50].select{ |x| checkers.all?{ |c| c[x] } } 
#=> [25, 15]

Update

Compare with (it works too, but what if you wanted lambda{ |x| x % 3 == 1 } ?)

checkers = 
  { :> => 10,
    :< => 30 }

[1, 25, 15, 7, 50].select{ |x| checkers.all?{ |k, v| x.send(k, v) } } 
#=> [25, 15]
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