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I'm looking for a recommendation on how best to implement MongoDB foreign key ObjectId fields. There seem to be two possible options, either containing the nested _id field or without.

Take a look at the fkUid field below.

{'_id':ObjectId('4ee12488f047051590000000'), 'fkUid':{'_id':ObjectId('4ee12488f047051590000001')} } 


{'_id':ObjectId('4ee12488f047051590000000'), 'fkUid':ObjectId('4ee12488f047051590000001')} }

Any recommendations would be much appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

I'm having a hard time coming up with any possible advantages for putting an extra field "layer" in there, so I would personally just store the ObjectId directly in fkUid.

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totally agree. Adding a subdocument makes it harder to query, harder to update, take up more space and probably slower. I'd also drop the 'fk' prefix. If your Message has a SenderId that is pretty obvious. – mnemosyn Dec 8 '11 at 22:23
yep, agreed with dropping that prefix. – tkrajcar Dec 8 '11 at 22:32

I suggest to use default dbref implementation, that is described here and is compatible with most of specific language drivers.

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I disagree. This quote from docs sums it up pretty nicely: "Unless you have a compelling reason for using DBrefs, use manual references". It depends on usage case of course, but this is not a good general-practice advice. – johndodo Jul 19 '12 at 9:27
"many drivers automatically resolve DBRefs" - this is compelling enough for me. Also it is easier to support such references in a large database structure. I agree that for small tasks where you are completely sure what are you doing it is just fine to use direct reference. – lig Jul 20 '12 at 9:59

If your question is about the naming of the field (what you have in the title), usually the convention is to name it after the object to which it refers.

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