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Python 3.2 in case that matters...

The following code shows that the "concrete class" can either implement some_method as a static method or an instance method:

import abc

class SomeAbstractClass(metaclass=abc.ABCMeta):

    @abc.abstractmethod
    def some_method(self): pass

class ValidConcreteClass1(SomeAbstractClass):

    @staticmethod
    def some_method():
        print("foo!")

class ValidConcreteClass2(SomeAbstractClass):

    def some_method(self):
        print("foo!")

ValidConcreteClass1.some_method()

instance = ValidConcreteClass2()
instance.some_method()

My question is, can I force the implementation of some_method to be static in the inheriting class?

I noticed @abc.abstractstaticmethod and thought this was the answer but the following code still runs just fine. I would think it would reject ValidConreteClass2 because some_method is not static:

import abc

class SomeAbstractClass(metaclass=abc.ABCMeta):

    @abc.abstractstaticmethod
    def some_method(self): pass

class ValidConcreteClass1(SomeAbstractClass):

    @staticmethod
    def some_method():
        print("foo!")

class ValidConcreteClass2(SomeAbstractClass):

    def some_method(self):
        print("foo!")

ValidConcreteClass1.some_method()

instance = ValidConcreteClass2()
instance.some_method()
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think some clarification is needed;

First, in Python every method is virtual - really virtual; so whether a method is static, or bound to a class or instance, that's a matter of the subclass, not of the parent one. You don't have a real reason for wanting to prevent that - what's your purpose?

Second, ABCs check for abstractness at instantiation time - if you try instancing a class that's still got any abstract method, an error will be raised. But ABCs can't do anything on static or class methods that are invoked from the class itself - there's NO CHECK performed on the method itself, just an attribute set on the method - it's ABCMeta that does the dirty work when the class is instanced.

Third, the purpose of abstractstaticmethod is to allow an abstract method - hence something that must be still be overriden someway by subclasses - to be static and used from anywhere - again, there's no check done on the method itself, so the following code is perfectly legal:

import abc

class SomeAbstractClass(metaclass=abc.ABCMeta):

    @abc.abstractstaticmethod
    def some_method(): 
        return 123

class ValidConcreteClass1(SomeAbstractClass):

    def some_method(self):
        return 456

inst = ValidConcreteClass1()
print(inst.some_method())
print(SomeAbstractClass.some_method())

The only reason for abstractstaticmethod/abstractclassmethod existence is that the following does not work because decorated methods lack a dict

class NotWorking(metaclass=abc.ABCMeta):
    @abc.abstractmethod
    @staticmethod
    def some_method(self):
        return "asd"

One last thing: if you really wanted to, you could probably add such functionality by extending ABCMeta, but I won't give you an hook on how to do this unless you tell me why you're doing that :-)

share|improve this answer
    
My reasoning was simply that I have dynamically collected (think plugin architecture where the program doesn't access the plugin classes until run-time) all the classes that derive from some abstract base class. I wanted to be able to count on the fact that the plugin sub-classes all exposed a particular static method. I could simply attempt to make the static call and throw an error if it doesn't work but I thought ABCs could help me here. –  Matthew Lund Dec 8 '11 at 23:08
    
You have confirmed that @abc.abstractstaticmethod doesn't help me, so that's useful to know. I think like you said, I either can't have this guarantee or I'd have to extend ABCMeta which I don't care to do. –  Matthew Lund Dec 8 '11 at 23:10
    
I wanted to be able to count on the fact that the plugin sub-classes all exposed a particular static method This is very much not pythonic. It's not your problem if the author of the code doesn't implement the class correctly. –  Falmarri Dec 8 '11 at 23:38
    
Doesn't that argument suggest that Python shouldn't even have abstract base classes? The fact that Python has abstract base classes suggests that at least some people want the ability to "enforce" (albeit lightly) a contract in order for a class to even be loadable. I will admit though, that my background is in strongly-typed languages where interfaces reigned supreme and I'm still learning the pythonic way to do things. –  Matthew Lund Dec 9 '11 at 0:08
    
Matthew, an abstract base class does what it says - you cannot instance it unless you override all of its abstract methods. But a static method is part of the interface of the class - the fact that in python you can call static methods on instances is just a detail and can be a feature - but if you want an abstract static/class method, you'd need an Abstract Base Metaclass ! –  Alan Franzoni Dec 9 '11 at 13:27

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