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Having a struct defined in a such way, I need to allocate memory

typedef struct string_collection {
    char **c;
    size_t current, allocated;
} TSC, *ASC;

So I came with this code, is it right or I missed something? First allocating struct descriptor and then enough space for d pointers to string

ASC AlocSC(size_t d)
{
    ASC sc;

    sc = (TSC*) malloc(sizeof(TSC));
    if (!sc) return NULL;

    sc->c = calloc(d, sizeof(char *));

    if (!sc->c) {
        free(sc);
        return NULL;
    }

    sc->current = 0;
    sc->allocated = d;

    return sc;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Are “x” and “sc” meant to have been the same thing? – BRPocock Dec 8 '11 at 21:22
    
Yes, forgot to rename them. – Mike Egren Dec 8 '11 at 21:24
    
@MikeEgren: You forgot one more x. – AusCBloke Dec 8 '11 at 21:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The code as edited is essentially correct, though I have several stylistic differences with you (such as not doing a typedef to hide the "pointerness" of an object, not using the size of the allocated object in the malloc/calloc call, and a few other things).

Your code, "cleaned up" a bit:

TSC *AlocSC(size_t d)
{
    TSC *sc = malloc(sizeof *sc);
    if (!sc) return NULL;

    sc->c = calloc(d, sizeof *sc->c);
    if (!sc->c) {
        free(sc);
        return NULL;
    }

    sc->current = 0;
    sc->allocated = d;

    return sc;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think he had it right, actually. His sc->c element is a char** – BRPocock Dec 8 '11 at 21:28
    
Why sizeof(char) and not sizeof(char*) ? – Mike Egren Dec 8 '11 at 21:29
    
@MikeEgren: You had it right, you want an array of string pointers and that's what you allocated. – AusCBloke Dec 8 '11 at 21:30
    
Ach ... missed that it was char **; I had assumed a string. Will edit answer accordingly. – Greg Jandl Dec 8 '11 at 21:32
3  
Note that using calloc() to allocate an array of pointers is not guaranteed to set those pointers to NULL. The language does not guarantee that a null pointer is represented as all-bits-zero. (Most compilers do so, but it's not a good idea to depend on it.) Recommendation: allocate the array of pointers with malloc(), and don't access any of the pointers until you've explicitly assigned a value to them. – Keith Thompson Dec 8 '11 at 21:50

As long as x is replaced with sc, it looks ok to me. You shouldn't, however, cast the return of malloc in C (read more here). I would instead have for that line:

sc = malloc(sizeof(*sc));

You can do the same for the size of type x->c points to (char*).

share|improve this answer
3  
and, as a stylistic thing: if you're going to typedef a “pointer type,” perhaps use it consistently. Personally, I dislike pointer typedefs as I think they're confusing to others reading the code; but it's more confusing still to see TSC* and ASC both being used; one has to retreat to the header file to discover that they're the same thing. – BRPocock Dec 8 '11 at 21:27
    
@BRPocock: Yeah exactly right, it irritates me to have simple pointer types typedef'd, but since I took out (TSC*) I thought I'd skip the point of using (ASC) instead. – AusCBloke Dec 8 '11 at 21:30
    
That was more directed at the original poster … in hopes that I don't wind up maintaining/editing/replacing yet another program full of obscured pointer types. I have a hard enough time remembering my -> and . dereferences with all the */& hints in C… – BRPocock Dec 8 '11 at 21:33

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