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I need to create a custom route for a WCF data service that contains a segment that must be extracted for use in filtering data.

Example:

http://mysample.net/mysamplesvc/client123/Users

I need to extract the client123 from the route. It looks like the Route class might provide something similar but I am not sure how to implement an IRouteHandler for a Data service.

Is this the correct path? Are there good examples around?

TIA!

UPDATE:

I have managed to achieve the solution I needed via some custom URL re-writing in the IDispatchMessageInspector. The below code is my initial hack and needs a bunch of clean-up. but, it appears to be working. If anybody sees anything galringly wrong, please let me know.

    public object AfterReceiveRequest(ref System.ServiceModel.Channels.Message request, IClientChannel channel, InstanceContext instanceContext)
    {
        HttpRequestMessageProperty httpmsg = (HttpRequestMessageProperty)request.Properties[HttpRequestMessageProperty.Name];
        ...Additional logic for handling Query formats in OData


        UriTemplate template = new UriTemplate("mysamplesvc/{ClientId}", true);

        Uri prefix = new Uri(HttpContext.Current.Request.Url.GetLeftPart(UriPartial.Authority));
        Uri uri = new Uri(HttpContext.Current.Request.Url.AbsoluteUri);
        UriTemplateMatch results = template.Match(prefix, uri);

        if (results != null && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(results.BoundVariables["ClientId"]))
        {
            _clientId = results.BoundVariables["clientId"].ToString();
        }

        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(_clientId))
        {
            httpmsg.Headers.Add("ClientId", _clientId);
            rewriteRequest();
        }
        return null;
    }

    private void rewriteRequest()
    {
        if (HttpContext.Current != null && HttpContext.Current.Session != null)
        {
            if (WebOperationContext.Current.IncomingRequest.UriTemplateMatch != null)
            {
                Uri serviceUri = HttpContext.Current.Session["ServiceUri"] as Uri;
                Uri requestUri = null;

                UriTemplateMatch match = WebOperationContext.Current.IncomingRequest.UriTemplateMatch;

                if (serviceUri == null)
                {
                    UriBuilder serviceUriBuilder = new UriBuilder(match.BaseUri);

                    serviceUri = serviceUriBuilder.Uri;
                    HttpContext.Current.Session["ServiceUri"] = serviceUri;
                }

                if (serviceUri != null)
                {
                    OperationContext.Current.IncomingMessageProperties["MicrosoftDataServicesRootUri"] = serviceUri;

                    UriBuilder requestUriBuilder = new UriBuilder(match.RequestUri);
                    string path = string.Empty;
                    if (match.RelativePathSegments[0] == _clientId)
                    {
                        foreach (var seg in match.RelativePathSegments.Select((x, i) => new { Value = x, Index = i }))
                        {
                            if (seg.Index != 0)
                            {
                                path += "/";
                                path += seg.Value;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        foreach (var seg in match.RelativePathSegments.Select((x, i) => new { Value = x, Index = i }))
                        {
                            path += "/";
                            path += seg.Value;
                        }
                    }

                    UriBuilder serviceUriBuilder = new UriBuilder(match.BaseUri + path);

                    // because we have overwritten the Root URI, we need to make sure the request URI shares the same host
                    // (sometimes we have request URI resolving to a different host, if there are firewall re-directs
                    serviceUriBuilder.Host = serviceUri.Host;

                    requestUri = serviceUriBuilder.Uri;
                    OperationContext.Current.IncomingMessageProperties["MicrosoftDataServicesRequestUri"] = requestUri;
                    OperationContext.Current.IncomingMessageProperties["Via"] = requestUri;
                }
            }

        }
    }

Thanks all!

share|improve this question
    
what does client123 represent in your domain? A typical scenario would be http://mysample.net/mysamplesvc/Users?client=client123 but I guess it's not what you are after? –  oleksii Dec 8 '11 at 22:16
    
@oleksii: It is actually a client or tenant for our saas offering. The idea is to require this id and requiring it via a query parameter seems a little awkward and does not match what we do with our other RESTful services. –  RockyMountainHigh Dec 8 '11 at 22:44
    
I am really stuck with this. I have tried acheiving this route by registering a serviceroute as well. the problem with that is that placeholders do not appear to be supported in service route. Please help! :-D –  RockyMountainHigh Dec 9 '11 at 17:44
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Another option is to use the IncomingWebRequestContext obtained from WebOperationContext.IncomingRequest. This will allow you directly access to the URI. The downside is that you will have to parse with Uri.Segments and will then have another piece of code tied to the uri-format.

You're problem ultimately stems from the fact that WCF, for all it's claims, does not support REST. REST should be a set of operations that take place on a resource identified by the URI. Instead, WCF provides a 'static' endpoint and a set of methods more similar to old-skool XML/SOAP than true REST.

I've personally found WCF to very problematic when dealing with REST services that act on a URI/resource. Frankly it provided little value and just got in the way. There are lots of REST architectures out there, many suffer this same limitation. You might consider bailing on WCF and find a payload serialization library that supports the formats you want to expose.

My current favorite is protobuf-csharp-port which supports XML, JSON, Protocol Buffers, and URI encoded messages. There is a brief introduction to building a REST service using protobuf-csharp-port. Although this sample is also a service-endpoint and not resource-based REST, the underlying serialization pattern is really what you're after.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the repose. It has been tremendously valuable. Unfortunately, I am not entirely sure I can support what I need to do with protobuf as I need to support the OData capability of WCF data services. Or am I missing something? As an option I was thinking of using the WebOperationContext but would then need to re-write the request without the clientid in order to avoid data services thinking Client123 is an EF resource. I've been fiddling with this but am fumbling a bit. –  RockyMountainHigh Dec 12 '11 at 18:12
    
@RockyMountainHigh Yea, if you need odata you are stuck. URL rewrite may be the best bet. I was thing about suggesting that, but it sounds like you are already on it :) –  csharptest.net Dec 12 '11 at 19:59
    
Lots of great suggestions but @csharptest.net got me the closest to my final solution for right or wrong. Thanks! –  RockyMountainHigh Dec 12 '11 at 22:11
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I'm assuming this is a MVC project

the typical routes in MVC, I believe, work like this:

//url looks like /controller/Details/42
public ViewResult Details(int id) {
  //do something
}

You can add custom routes like this:

routes.MapRoute(
           "my special little route", // Route name
           "customer/{Cid}/programs/{Pid}",
           new { controller = "customer", action = "Details" }
       );

so the view then looks like:

//url looks like /customer/{21}/programs/42
public ViewResult Details(int Cid, int Pid) {
  //do something
}

so you should, in theory, be able to do that to your WCF service. Unless I'm completely misunderstanding what you're saying at which I will happily try to update my answer

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick response. This actually is not an MVC project unfortunately I am using a standard web project with WCF data services. I have not attempted using MVC with WCF data services. Are you aware of whether this is possible? If it is this could my magic bullet as I am much more familiar with MVC routing. –  RockyMountainHigh Dec 12 '11 at 18:08
    
yes you can use WCF with MVC. I'm not completely sure about the routing though, since typically as I've seen it accessed via foo.com/service.svc –  Eonasdan Dec 12 '11 at 18:11
    
I would test this myself but I'm testing VS 11 and there's a problem with the WCF data services template that MS is aware of. –  Eonasdan Dec 12 '11 at 18:13
    
Sorry, but are you aware of any good examples of hosting a WCF data service in an ASP.net MVC app? I cannot seem to find any that apply to my situation. Mainly just examples of binding an MVC site to a WCF data service. Thanks! –  RockyMountainHigh Dec 12 '11 at 20:10
    
Scott Hanslmen as a good post about using SOs database and this one for netflix odata –  Eonasdan Dec 12 '11 at 21:08
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