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I wrote a very simple encryption program to practice c++ and i came across this weird behavior. When i convert my char* array to a string by setting the string equal to the array, then i get a wrong string, however when i create an empty string and add append the chars in the array individually, it creates the correct string. Could someone please explain why this is happening, i just started programming in c++ last week and i cannot figure out why this is not working.

Btw i checked online and these are apparently both valid ways of converting a char array to a string.

void expandPassword(string* pass)
{
    int pHash = hashCode(pass);
    int pLen = pass->size();
    char* expPass = new char[264];
    for (int i = 0; i < 264; i++)
    {
        expPass[i] = (*pass)[i % pLen] * (char) rand();
    }
    string str;
    for (int i = 0; i < 264; i++)
    {
        str += expPass[i];// This creates the string version correctly
    }

    string str2 = expPass;// This creates much shorter string
    cout <<str<<"\n--------------\n"<<str2<<"\n---------------\n";

    delete[] expPass;
}

EDIT: I removed all of the zeros from the array and it did not change anything

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11  
Your encoded string contains zeros. –  Hans Passant Dec 8 '11 at 22:10
    
What do you mean by "wrong string"? That the resulting string is identical to the first string, except that the resulting string stops at the first '\0' character in the original string"? –  Max Lybbert Dec 8 '11 at 22:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When copying from char* to std::string, the assignment operator stops when it reaches the first NULL character. This points to a problem with your "encryption" which is causing embedded NULL characters.

This is one of the main reasons why encoding is used with encrypted data. After encryption, the resulting data should be encoded using Hex/base16 or base64 algorithms.

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Thanks, i thought that everyone else way saying that it simply ignores the 0's. By the way that is not the encryption but the expansion for the key. Also what do you mean by it being encoded? –  Stas Jaro Dec 8 '11 at 22:22
    
The best place to start with encoding is Hexadecimal or base16 encoding (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexadecimal) –  jveazey Dec 18 '11 at 20:33

a c-string as what you are constructing is a series of characters ending with a \0 (zero) ascii value.

in the case of

expPass[i] = (*pass)[i % pLen] * (char) rand();

you may be inserting \0 into the array if the expression evaluates to 0, as well as you do not append a \0 at the end of the string either to assure it being a valid c-string.

when you do

string str2 = expPass;

it can very well be that the string gets shorter since it gets truncated when it finds a \0 somewhere in the string.

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This is because str2 = expPass interprets expPass as a C-style string, meaning that a zero-valued ("null") byte '\0' indicates the end of the string. So, for example, this:

char p[2];
p[0] = 'a';
p[1] = '\0';
std::string s = p;

will cause s to have length 1, since p has only one nonzero byte before its terminating '\0'. But this:

char p[2];
p[0] = 'a';
p[1] = '\0';
std::string s;
s += p[0];
s += p[1];

will cause s to have length 2, because it explicitly adds both bytes to s. (A std::string, unlike a C-style string, can contain actual null bytes — though it's not always a good idea to take advantage of that.)

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I guess the following line cuts your string:

expPass[i] = (*pass)[i % pLen] * (char) rand();

If rand() returns 0 you get a string terminator at position i.

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