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I made a program to count words from individual files, but how can i modify my program, so it gives the total amount of words from all files (as ONE value).

My code looks like this:

public class WordCount implements Runnable
{
   public WordCount(String filename)
   {
      this.filename = filename;
   }

   public void run()
   {
      int count = 0;
      try
      {
         Scanner in = new Scanner(new File(filename));

         while (in.hasNext())
         {
            in.next();
            count++;
         }
         System.out.println(filename + ": " + count);
      }
      catch (FileNotFoundException e)
      {
         System.out.println(filename + " blev ikke fundet.");
      }
   }
   private String filename;
}

With a Main-Class:

public class Main
{

   public static void main(String args[])
   {
      for (String filename : args)
      {
         Runnable tester = new WordCount(filename);

         Thread t = new Thread(tester);
         t.start();
      }
   }
}

And how to avoid race conditions? Thank you for your help.

share|improve this question
1  
What race conditions? I also don't see how where you add the word counts of different files. –  zmbq Dec 8 '11 at 22:18
    
Do you want one runnable/file, or do you just want that specific runnable to loop over all files. The multi-threading remark makes this a confusing question –  Robin Dec 8 '11 at 22:20
    
I added my main-class now. –  Chris Dec 8 '11 at 22:22

7 Answers 7

A worker thread:

class WordCount extends Thread
{

   int count;

   @Override
   public void run()
   {
      count = 0;
      /* Count the words... */
      ...
      ++count;
      ...
   }

}

And a class to use them:

class Main
{

   public static void main(String args[]) throws InterruptedException
   {
      WordCount[] counters = new WordCount[args.length];
      for (int idx = 0; idx < args.length; ++idx) {
         counters[idx] = new WordCount(args[idx]);
         counters[idx].start();
      }
      int total = 0;
      for (WordCount counter : counters) {
        counter.join();
        total += counter.count;
      }
      System.out.println("Total: " + total);
   }

}

Many hard drives don't do a great job of reading multiple files concurrently. Locality of reference has a big impact on performance.

share|improve this answer
    
VERY usefull. Thank you very very much. –  Chris Dec 8 '11 at 22:58
    
Works perfectly. –  Chris Dec 8 '11 at 23:10

You can either use Future to get the count number and in the end add up all the counts or use a static variable and increment it in a synchronized manner i.e. use explicitely synchronized or use Atomic Increment

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. –  Chris Dec 8 '11 at 22:24
    
The variable doesn't have to be static, just has to be agreed-upon for all of the Runnables. –  yshavit Dec 8 '11 at 22:29
    
@Chris:Check the answers here stackoverflow.com/questions/8438497/… –  Cratylus Dec 8 '11 at 22:30
    
@yshavit:You are right –  Cratylus Dec 8 '11 at 22:34
    
@user384706 You linked to this answer on this question -- did you mean to paste a link to another question? –  yshavit Dec 8 '11 at 22:50

What if your Runnable took two arguments:

  • a BlockingQueue<String> or BlockingQueue<File> of input files
  • an AtomicLong

In a loop, you would get the next String/File from the queue, count its words, and increment the AtomicLong by that amount. Whether the loop is while(!queue.isEmpty()) or while(!done) depends on how you feed files into the queue: if you know all the files from the start, you can use the isEmpty version, but if you're streaming them in from somewhere, you want to use the !done version (and have done be a volatile boolean or AtomicBoolean for memory visibility).

Then you feed these Runnables to an executor, and you should be good to go.

share|improve this answer
    
When I run the program I'm giving all the files as arguments, so I know them all from the start. And thank you :) –  Chris Dec 8 '11 at 22:30

You can create some listener to get a feedback from the thread.

   public interface ResultListener {
       public synchronized void result(int words);
   }
   private String filename;
   private ResultListener listener;
   public void run()
   {
     int count = 0;
     try
     {
       Scanner in = new Scanner(new File(filename));

       while (in.hasNext())
       {
          in.next();
          count++;
       }
       listener.result(count); 
    }
    catch (FileNotFoundException e)
    {
       System.out.println(filename + " blev ikke fundet.");
    }
   }
  }

You can add a contructor parameter for the listener just like for your filename.

  public class Main
  {
     private static int totalCount = 0;
     private static ResultListener listener = new ResultListener(){
         public synchronized void result(int words){
            totalCount += words;
         }
     }
     public static void main(String args[])
     {
        for (String filename : args)
        {
           Runnable tester = new WordCount(filename, listener);

           Thread t = new Thread(tester);
           t.start();
        }
     }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
I was just about to ask, what to do if I didnt know the amount of files, in the code. But i see you changed that. Thank you! –  Chris Dec 8 '11 at 22:35

You can make the count volatile and static so all the threads can increment it.

public class WordCount implements Runnable
{
   private static AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(0); // <-- now all threads increment the same count

   private String filename;

   public WordCount(String filename)
   {
      this.filename = filename;
   }

   public static int getCount()
   {
       return count.get();
   }

   public void run()
   {
      try
      {
         Scanner in = new Scanner(new File(filename));

         while (in.hasNext())
         {
            in.next();
            count.incrementAndGet();
         }
         System.out.println(filename + ": " + count);
      }
      catch (FileNotFoundException e)
      {
         System.out.println(filename + " blev ikke fundet.");
      }
   }
}

Update: haven't done java in a while, but the point about making it a private static field still stands... just make it an AtomicInteger.

share|improve this answer
    
Youre better off using AtomicInteger, post/pre-increment are not atomic –  John Vint Dec 8 '11 at 22:31
    
count++ has a race condition there (see my comment to @zmbq's answer) –  yshavit Dec 8 '11 at 22:32
    
Good point (haven't done Java in a while, been in the C# world), so use an Atomic integer and make it a private static field. –  Lirik Dec 8 '11 at 22:43

You could create a Thread pool with a synchronized task queue that would hold all of the files you wish to count the words for.

When your thread pool workers come online they could ask the task queue for a file to count. After the worker completes their job then they could notify the main thread of their final number.

The main thread would have a synchronized notify method that would add up all of the worker threads' results.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, i think i undestand - but Future sounds a bit more simple. –  Chris Dec 8 '11 at 22:26

Or you can have all the threads update a single word count variable. count++ is atomic if count is word-sided (an int should suffice).

EDIT: Turns out the Java specs are just silly enough that count++ is not atomic. I have no idea why. Anyway, look at AtomicInteger and its incrementAndGet method. Hopefully this is atomic (I don't know what to expect now...), and you don't need any other synchronization mechanisms - just store your count in an AtomicInteger.

share|improve this answer
    
count++ is not atomic, even if it's word sized. You could easily have something like: thread1 reads count=1, thread2 reads count=1, thread1 increments 1 to 2, thread2 increments 1 to 2, thread1 writes count=2, thread2 writes count=2. You have to use synchronization or a CAS (as provided by AtomicLong or AtomicInteger). –  yshavit Dec 8 '11 at 22:32
    
On what jitter isn't count++ atomic? If the jitter compiles it to anything other than INC [count] it should be retired. –  zmbq Dec 8 '11 at 22:33
    
Only reading and writing in 32 bit or less quantities is guaranteed to be atomic.Increment is not an atomic operation –  Cratylus Dec 8 '11 at 22:36
    
Stupid Java. I'll edit my answer, but really - stupid Java. This makes no sense. –  zmbq Dec 8 '11 at 22:39
1  
I don't pretend to know all the machine instructions out there, but if INC works on a register, and count lives in a field except when it's loaded into a register for incrementing, then that's a race condition. And who says the JIT has even compiled this code yet? The spec says count++ isn't atomic, so you shouldn't rely on it being atomic. –  yshavit Dec 8 '11 at 22:40

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