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Sorry in advance that this might be a little challenging to read...

I'm trying to parse a line (actually a subject line from an IMAP server) that looks like this:

=?utf-8?Q?Here is som?= =?utf-8?Q?e text.?=

It's a little hard to see, but there are two =?/?= pairs in the above line. (There will always be one pair; there can theoretically be many.) In each of those =?/?= pairs, I want the third argument (as defined by a ? delimiter) extracted. (In the first pair, it's "Here is som", and in the second it's "e text.")

Here's the regex I'm using:

=\?(.+)\?.\?(.*?)\?=

I want it to return two matches, one for each =?/?= pair. Instead, it's returning the entire line as a single match. I would have thought that the ? in the (.*?), to make the * operator lazy, would have kept this from happening, but obviously it doesn't.

Any suggestions?

EDIT: Per suggestions below to replace ".?" with "[^(\?=)]?" I'm now trying to do:

=\?(.+)\?.\?([^(\?=)]*?)\?=

...but it's not working, either. (I'm unsure whether [^(\?=)]*? is the proper way to test for exclusion of a two-character sequence like "?=". Is it correct?)

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4 Answers 4

Try this:

\=\?([^?]+)\?.\?(.*?)\?\=

I changed the .+ to [^?]+, which means "everything except ?"

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Valid suggestion, but you modified the wrong argument: it should be the 2nd set of parentheses, not the first. (See my edit above.) Also, the ending delimiter is a ?=, not just a ?. How can I test for that? Thanks. –  Greg Maletic Dec 9 '11 at 0:38

A good practice in my experience is not to use .*? but instead do use the * without the ?, but refine the character class. In this case [^?]* to match a sequence of non-question mark characters.

You can also match more complex endmarkers this way, for instance, in this case your end-limiter is ?=, so you want to match nonquestionmarks, and questionmarks followed by non-equals:

([^?]*\?[^=])*[^?]*

At this point it becomes harder to choose though. I like that this solution is stricter, but readability decreases in this case.

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Valid suggestion, but the ending delimiter is a ?=, not just a ?. How can I test for that? (See my edit above.) Thanks. –  Greg Maletic Dec 9 '11 at 0:38
    
Added some more explanation. You can't match multiple characters at once in a character class, and [^(\?=)] is actually the character class that won't match parentheses, backslash, questionmark and equals. –  markijbema Dec 9 '11 at 7:03

One solution:

=\?(.*?)\?=\s*=\?(.*?)\?=

Explanation:

=\?    # Literal characters '=?'
(.*?)  # Match each character until find next one in the regular expression. A '?' in this case.
\?=    # Literal characters '?='
\s*    # Match spaces.
=\?    # Literal characters '=?'
(.*?)  # Match each character until find next one in the regular expression. A '?' in this case.
\?=    # Literal characters '?='

Test in a 'perl' program:

use warnings;
use strict;

while ( <DATA> ) { 
    printf qq[Group 1 -> %s\nGroup 2 -> %s\n], $1, $2 if m/=\?(.*?)\?=\s*=\?(.*?)\?=/;
}   

__DATA__
=?utf-8?Q?Here is som?= =?utf-8?Q?e text.?=

Running:

perl script.pl

Results:

Group 1 -> utf-8?Q?Here is som                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Group 2 -> utf-8?Q?e text.

EDIT to comment:

I would use the global modifier /.../g. Regular expression would be:

/=\?(?:[^?]*\?){2}([^?]*)/g

Explanation:

=\?              # Literal characters '=?'
(?:[^?]*\?){2}   # Any number of characters except '?' with a '?' after them. This process twice to omit the string 'utf-8?Q?'
([^?]*)          # Save in a group next characters until found a '?'
/g               # Repeat this process multiple times until end of string.

Tested in a Perl script:

use warnings;
use strict;

while ( <DATA> ) {
        printf qq[Group -> %s\n], $1 while m/=\?(?:[^?]*\?){2}([^?]*)/g;

}

__DATA__
=?utf-8?Q?Here is som?= =?utf-8?Q?e text.?= =?utf-8?Q?more text?=

Running and results:

Group -> Here is som
Group -> e text.
Group -> more text
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There won't always be two pairs of =?/?=, which is the case that your solution seems to hard-code. Most of the times, just one, occasionally two, theoretically an infinite number. Is there a quick fix to your solution that takes this into consideration? Thanks! –  Greg Maletic Dec 9 '11 at 0:16
    
I edited my answer. –  Birei Dec 9 '11 at 10:01
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for everyone's answers! The simplest expression that solved my issue was this:

=\?(.*?)\?.\?(.*?)\?=

The only difference between this and my originally-posted expression was the addition of a ? (non-greedy) operator on the first ".*". Critical, and I'd forgotten it.

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