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I'd like a cleaner way to obtain the following functionality, to catch AError and BError in one block:

try
{
    /* something */
}
catch( AError, BError $e )
{
    handler1( $e )
}
catch( Exception $e )
{
    handler2( $e )
}

Is there any way to do this? Or do I have to catch them separately?

AError and Berror have a shared base class, but they also share it with other types that I'd like to fall through to handler2, so I can't just catch the base class.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 80 down vote accepted

I don't think that's possible (your example code). The catch() block only takes one argument, the exception object.

You could catch all with Exception and then check which exception was thrown with instanceof.

try
{
    /* something */
}
catch( Exception $e )
{
    if ($e instanceof AError OR $e instanceof BError) {
       // It's either an A or B exception.
    } else {
        // Keep throwing it.
        throw $e;
    }
}

CodePad.

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1  
That's what I was afraid of. Catching them together and testing the type would be good if there were many error types that needed to be handled together, but for only 2, such as in my case, catching them separately is probably cleaner. Thanks! –  Dominic Gurto Dec 9 '11 at 0:44
3  
@DominicGurto: Yeah, I'd go with that too :) I'd be more concerned with PHP's attitude towards a finally statement. ;) –  alex Dec 9 '11 at 0:50
7  
But don't forget that this catches ALL exceptions, so there should be something like ... } else { throw($e); } if it doesn't match the two. Sorry for maybe wrong syntax, didn't see php a while. –  NoICE Dec 9 '11 at 0:51
1  
@rdlowrey: No, I said it's not possible with the code example the OP used. Then I suggested a workaround. –  alex Dec 9 '11 at 1:20
7  
If you read the first paragraph here: php.net/manual/en/language.exceptions.php you will see multiple catch blocks are possible and perfectly valid solution. The OP though had mistakenly put two exception classes in one catch statement. I think it will be better to update your answer with another example with multiple catch blocks. –  Haralan Dobrev Aug 7 '13 at 16:06

Despite what these other answers say, you can catch AError and BError in the same block (it is somewhat easier if you are the one defining the exceptions). Even given that there are exceptions you want to "fall through", you should still be able to define a hierarchy to match your needs.

abstract class MyExceptions extends \Exception {}

abstract class LetterError extends MyExceptions {}

class AError extends LetterError {}

class BError extends LetterError {}

Then:

catch(LetterError $e){
    //voodoo
}

As you can see here and here, even the SPL default exceptions have a hierarchy you can leverage. Additionally, as stated in the PHP Manual:

When an exception is thrown, code following the statement will not be executed, and PHP will attempt to find the first matching catch block.

This means you could also have

class CError extends LetterError {}

which you need to handle differently than AError or BError, so your catch statement would look like this:

catch(CError $e){
    //voodoo
}
catch(LetterError $e){
    //voodoo
}

If you had the case where there were twenty or more exceptions that legitimately belonged under the same superclass, and you needed to handle five (or whatever large-ish group) of them one way and the rest the other, you can STILL do this.

interface Group1 {}

class AError extends LetterError implements Group1 {}

class BError extends LetterError implements Group1 {}

And then:

catch (Group1 $e) {}

Using OOP when it comes to exceptions is very powerful. Using things like get_class or instanceof are hacks, and should be avoided if possible.

Another solution I would like to add is putting the exception handling functionality in its own method.

You could have

function handleExceptionMethod1(Exception $e)
{
    //voodoo
}

function handleExceptionMethod2(Exception $e)
{
    //voodoo
}

Assuming there is absolutely no way you can control exception class hierarchies or interfaces (and there almost always will be a way), you can do the following:

try
{
    stuff()
}
catch(ExceptionA $e)
{
    $this->handleExceptionMethod1($e);
}
catch(ExceptionB $e)
{
    $this->handleExceptionMethod1($e);
}
catch(ExceptionC $e)
{
    $this->handleExceptionMethod1($e);
}
catch(Exception $e)
{
    $this->handleExceptionMethod2($e);
}

In this way, you are still have a only single code location you have to modify if your exception handling mechanism needs to change, and you are working within the general constructs of OOP.

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3  
This is the correct way of doing this –  Angel.King.47 Oct 16 '13 at 15:25
    
This should be the accepted answer. –  Raisch Feb 14 '14 at 11:20
1  
Here's another vote for this as the correct answer. Unfortunately stuff like what is said in the accepted answer and the fact that it is accepted as the correct answer, is what makes PHP the madness that it is. –  borfast Apr 2 '14 at 23:31
    
This should be the accepted answer. Although, it assumes that you are able to modify the files. AError could be implemented in a library/file which is updated by a third party. –  WaffleStealer654 Jul 20 '14 at 3:50
    
@WaffleStealer654 You can still subclass the files and make those implement your group, even if you can't edit the files directly. That would presume you can throw the exceptions, but you could just wrap the most base-level mechanism where the exception would be throw and then catch it and throw your wrapped exception. –  MirroredFate Aug 15 '14 at 16:30

As an extension to the accepted answer, you could switch the type of Exception resulting in a pattern that is somewhat like the original example:

try {

    // Try something

} catch (Exception $e) {

    switch (get_class($e)) {

        case 'AError':
        case 'BError':
            // Handle A or B
            break;

        case 'CError':
            // Handle C
            break;

        case default:
            // Rethrow the Exception
            throw $e;

    }

}
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1  
use multiple catches instead of this solution. –  Alejandro Moreno Oct 7 '14 at 8:42

This article covers the question electrictoolbox.com/php-catch-multiple-exception-types. Content of the post copied directly from the article:

Example exceptions

Here's some example exceptions that have been defined for the purposes of this example:

class FooException extends Exception 
{
  public function __construct($message = null, $code = 0) 
  {
    // do something
  }
}

class BarException extends Exception 
{
  public function __construct($message = null, $code = 0) 
  {
    // do something
  }
}

class BazException extends Exception 
{
  public function __construct($message = null, $code = 0) 
  {
    // do something
  }
}

Handling multiple exceptions

It's very simple - there can be a catch block for each exception type that can be thrown:

try 
{
  // some code that might trigger a Foo/Bar/Baz/Exception
}

catch(FooException $e) 
{
  // we caught a foo exception
}

catch(BarException $e) 
{
  // we caught a bar exception
}

catch(BazException $e) 
{
  // we caught a baz exception
}

catch(Exception $e) 
{
  // we caught a normal exception
  // or an exception that wasn't handled by any of the above
}

If an exception is thrown that is not handled by any of the other catch statements it will be handled by the catch(Exception $e) block. It does not necessarily have to be the last one.

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1  
The problem with this method comes when you have to execute the same code for two or more different Exceptions. –  renocor May 14 '13 at 18:18
    
This was retrieved from Electric Toolbox. Editing post to give credit. –  WaffleStealer654 Jul 20 '14 at 3:54

Here's a reasonable alternative if you don't have control over defining the exceptions. Use the name of the exception variable to categorize the exceptions when they are caught. Then check for the exception variable after the try/catch block.

$ABError = null;
try {
    // something
} catch (AError $ABError) {  // let the exception fall through
} catch (BError $ABError) {  // let the exception fall through
} catch (Exception $e) {
    handler2($e);
}
if ($ABError) {
    handler1($ABError);
}

This somewhat odd looking approach is probably only worth it if there is a lot of duplication between catch block implementations.

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