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I have this table under user_name='high'

function_description :

akram is in a date

test

akram is studying

test4

kheith is male

test3

I want a query that returns results of field that have at least an 'akram'

SELECT * 
  FROM functions 
 WHERE 'isEnabled'=1
   AND 'isPrivate'=1
   AND user_name='high'
   AND function_description LIKE '%akram%'

and this returns absolutely nothing!

Why?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are listing the column names as if they are strings. This is why it returns nothing.

Try this:

SELECT * 
FROM functions 
WHERE user_name='high'
AND function_description LIKE '%akram%'

edit: After trying to re-read your question... are isEnabled and isPrivate columns in this table? edit2: updated.. remove those unknown columns.

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#1054 - Unknown column 'isEnabled' in 'where clause' –  Med Akram Z Dec 9 '11 at 1:43
    
no they are not columns –  Med Akram Z Dec 9 '11 at 1:45
    
now its works thank u –  Med Akram Z Dec 9 '11 at 2:00

You are comparing strings 'isEnabled' with integer 1, which likely leads to the integer being converted to a string, and the comparison then fails. (The alternative is that the string is converted to an integer 0 and the comparison still fails.)

In MySQL, you use back-quotes, not single quotes, to quote column and table names:

SELECT * 
  FROM `functions` 
 WHERE `isEnabled` = 1
   AND `isPrivate` = 1
   AND `user_name` = 'high'
   AND `function_description` LIKE '%akram%'

In standard SQL, you use double quotes to create a 'delimited identifier'; in Microsoft SQL Server, you use square brackets around the names.

Please show the schema more carefully (column names, sample values, types if need be) next time.

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#1054 - Unknown column 'isEnabled' in 'where clause' , this is what it shows –  Med Akram Z Dec 9 '11 at 1:49
2  
OK - this is why you need to show us the table schema. We can't tell what columns you have in your tables, so we have to make plausible guesses, but one of the big problems is that people asking questions are cleverer at creating unexpected scenarios than we are at divining them. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 9 '11 at 1:51
    
okay ill post carefully next time .. thank you –  Med Akram Z Dec 9 '11 at 1:55

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