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I want to make a method that safely stops a thread running in a loop, allowing for the last loop to finish before returning control to the stopper.

Right now, no matter what I try, I freeze. Possibly out of deadlocks or whatnot; Java is not my usual environment, hence why this may be yet-another wait/notify question.

boolean isRunning = true;

@Override
public void run() {
    super.run();

    while (isRunning) {
        // Do work...
    }

    synchronized(this) {
        this.notify();
    }
}

public void stopSafely() {
    isRunning = false;

    try {
        synchronized(this) {
            this.wait();
        }
    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
        // Handle...
    }
}

The problem with this approach (apart from the fact that I synchronize on this, but it's for the sake of example simplicity), is that if notify gets called before wait, the caller will freeze.

I'm sure that playing with the blocks I surround in synchronized could fix the problem, but I can't seem to get the right combination.

Any idea?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just go for the real simple solution:

private volatile boolean isRunning = true;

@Override
public void run() {
    while (isRunning) {
        // Do work...
    }
}

public void stopThread() {
    isRunning = false;
}

that's basically what Thread.interrupted() does internally, so you can just use this as well:

@Override
public void run() {
    while (Thread.interrupted()) {
        // Do work...
    }
}

in which case you have to call interrupt() on the thread.

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I hope the second method is called from a different thread that the one with the run method. I bet so.

In this case, placing the isRunning=false inside the synchronized block could be enough. Only one thread can enter a block synchronized on a given monitor.

Btw, don't call super.run(), it's useless and not a good programming habit.

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First thing to start with make isRunning volatile.

volatile boolean isRunning = true;

The problem is that java runtime do some optimization and value is not reflected in the other thread even though first thread changed the value.

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Found a much simpler solution, which simply prevents from checking isRunning when doing the change:

boolean isRunning = true;

@Override
public void run() {
    while (true) {
        synchronized(this) {
            if (!isRunning) break;
        }

        // Do work...
    }
}

public void stopSafely() {
    synchronized(this) {
        isRunning = false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
if you keep this, use private synchronized stopSafely() { isRunning=false;} that is simpler and equivalent. –  Snicolas Dec 9 '11 at 3:18
    
But its not a good idea to synchronize the whole run method as you do. –  Snicolas Dec 9 '11 at 3:20
    
As written, this will deadlock any call to stopSafely, no? –  Michael Brewer-Davis Dec 9 '11 at 3:22
    
You're right, I changed the method for your comments. Look at the edit please. –  Lazlo Dec 9 '11 at 3:23
1  
This method uses synchronization as a memory barrier. As you're not actually using wait, notify or doing anything requiring atomicity you should use @Voo's suggestion of just using a volatile variable. –  Bringer128 Dec 9 '11 at 3:56

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