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How Do You Implement Specification Pattern for querying database using NHibernate?(without LINQ to NHibernate).I read a lot about Specification Pattern but most of them was about Validation and Querying Memory collection objects.

Best method as far as I know using DetachedCriteria in Specification Interface like this.

interface ISpecification<T> {

 bool IsSatisfiedBy(T object);

 DetachedCriteria CreateCriteria();

}

Is there any alternative or better way to do this?

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I was investigating a similar subject and found these posts interesting: Specification Pattern Implementation and Extensible Query with Specification Pattern –  Marijn Jan 21 '11 at 9:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is not nessary better, but can be an alternative

interface ISpecification<T> 
{
   bool IsSatisfiedBy(T object);

   Func<T, bool> Predicate { get; }
}

Easy to use over linq (to nhibernate) and memory-collections.

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How can I use this over database ?Can you give me an example? –  mcaaltuntas May 11 '09 at 5:23
    
return MyISession.Linq<MyEntity>().Where(specification.Preficate).ToList() –  Paco May 11 '09 at 19:07
    
I don't really use it that simple in my code, but I use a query object to add support for eager loading, ordering, projections, etc. –  Paco May 11 '09 at 19:08
5  
To make this have any chance of performing the filter in SQL, Predicate should be an Expression<Func<T, bool>> instead. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 3 '10 at 12:12

I implemented this using a simple extension method and specification pattern, works for System.Linq.IQueryable lists.

public interface IFilter<in T>
{
    bool MatchFilter(T o);
}

public static class FilterExtension
{
    public static IQueryable<T> Filter<T>(this IQueryable<T> query, IFilter<T> filter)
    {
        return query.Where(x => filter.MatchFilter(x));
    }
}

Simple example classes and IFilter implementation:

public class Organization
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Code { get; set; }
    public Address Address { get; set; }


    public Organization(string name, string code, string city, string country)
    {
        Name = name;
        Code = code;
        Address = new Address(city, country);
    }

}

public class Address
{
    public Address(string city, string country)
    {
        City = city;
        Country = country;
    }

    public string City { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; }
}

public class GenericOrganizationFilter : IFilter<Organization>
{
    public string FilterString { get; set; }

    public GenericOrganizationFilter(string filterString)
    {
        FilterString = filterString;
    }

    public bool MatchFilter(Organization o)
    {
        return
            (o.Name != null && o.Name.Contains(FilterString)) ||
            (o.Code != null && o.Code.Contains(FilterString)) ||
            (o.Address != null && o.Address.City != null && o.Address.City.Contains(FilterString)) || 
            (o.Address != null && o.Address.Country != null && o.Address.Country.Contains(FilterString));
    }
}

Usage:

IFilter<Organization> filter = new GenericOrganizationFilter("search string");
//Assuming queryable is an instance of IQueryable<Organization>. 
IQueryable<Organization> filtered = queryable.Filter(filter);
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Another, slightly different, implementation: http://www.agile-code.com/blog/nhibernate-and-the-specification-pattern/

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