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I have a file reflog with the content as below. There will be items with same name but different extensions. I want to check that for each of the items (file1, file2 & file3 here as example), it needs to be exist in both extensions (.abc and .def). If both extensions exist, it will perform some regex and print out. Else it will just report out with the file name together with extension (ie, if only on of file1.abc or file1.def exists, it will be printed out).

reflog:

file1.abc


file2.abc

file2.def 

file3.abc
file3.def

file4.abc 

file5.abc 
file5.def
file6.def
file8abc.def
file7.abc

file1.def
file9abc.def
file10def.abc

My script is as below (editted from yb007 script), but I have some issues with the output that I don;t know how to resolve. I notice the output is going to be wrong when the reflog file having any file with the name *abc.def (such as ie. file8abc.def & file9abc.def). It will be trim down the last 4 suffix and return the wrong .ext (which is .abc here but I suppose it should be .def).

    #! /usr/bin/perl 
    use strict; 
    use warnings; 
    my @files_abc ;
    my @files_def ;
    my $line;
    open(FILE1, 'reflog') || die ("Could not open reflog") ;
    open (FILE2, '>log') || die ("Could not open log") ;
    while ($line = <FILE1>) {   
        if($line=~ /(.*).abc/) {       
            push(@files_abc,$1);   
        } elsif ($line=~ /(.*).def/) { 
            push(@files_def,$1);     } 
    } 
    close(FILE1);

    my %first = map { $_ => 1 } @files_def ;
    my @same = grep { $first{$_} } @files_abc ;
    my @abc_only = grep { !$first{$_} } @files_abc ;
    foreach my $abc (sort @abc_only) {
        $abc .= ".abc";
    }   

    my %second = map {$_=>1} @files_abc; 
    my @same2 = grep { $second{$_} } @files_def; #@same and same2 are equal.
    my @def_only = grep { !$second{$_} } @files_def;
    foreach my $def (sort @def_only) {
        $def .= ".def";
    }

    my @combine_all = sort (@same, @abc_only, @def_only);
    print "\nCombine all:-\n @combine_all\n" ;
    print "\nList of files with same extension\n @same";  
    print "\nList of files with abc only\n @abc_only"; 
    print "\nList of files with def only\n @def_only"; 
    foreach my $item (sort @combine_all) {
        print FILE2 "$item\n" ;
    }
    close (FILE2) ;

My output is like this which is wrong:- 1st:- print screen output as below: Combine all:- file.abc file.abc file1 file10def.abc file2 file3 file4.abc file5 file6.def file7.abc

List of files with same extension
 file1 file2 file3 file5
List of files with abc only
 file4.abc file.abc file7.abc file.abc file10def.abc
List of files with def only
 file6.def

Log output as below:
    **file.abc
    file.abc**
    file1
    file10def.abc
    file2
    file3
    file4.abc
    file5
    file6.def
    file7.abc

Can you pls help me take a look where gies wrong? Thanks heaps.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want the log file to be executable? Use chmod 0640, "log";. You should probably use the 3-argument form of open and lexical file handles: open my $file, '<', "reflog" or die;, etc. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 9 '11 at 5:34
    
Is the input already sorted? Are the only extensions of relevance .abc and .def? –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 9 '11 at 5:41
    
Yes the input file reflog has been sorted earlier. Also, yes it only have 2 extention for each file name. SO, in most of teh cases, it will be have file1.abc amd file1.def. Thanks –  Grace Dec 9 '11 at 6:10
    
-1 for wasting the time of folks trying to help you due to retyping and introducing typos. Never retype code/data, use copy/past instead. –  tadmc Dec 9 '11 at 14:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
use strict;
use warnings;

my @files_abc;
my @files_def;
my $line;

open(FILE,'reflog') || die ("could not open reflog");

while ($line = <FILE>) {
    if($line=~ /(.*)\.abc/) {
        push(@files_abc,$1);
    }
    elsif($line=~ /(.*)\.def/) {
        push(@files_def,$1);
    }
}

close(FILE);

my %second = map {$_=>1} @files_def;
my @same = grep { $second{$_} } @files_abc;

print "\nList of files with same extension\n @same";


foreach my $abc (@files_abc) {
           $abc .= ".abc";
         }
foreach my $def (@files_def) {
           $def .= ".def";
         }

print "\nList of files with abc extension\n @files_abc";
print "\nList of files with def extension\n @files_def";

Output is

List of files with same extension
file1 file2 file3 file5

List of files with abc extension
file1.abc file2.abc file3.abc file4.abc file5.abc file7.abc file10def.abc

List of files with def extension
file2.def file3.def file5.def file6.def file8abc.def file1.def file9abc.def

Hope this helps...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks yb007, I'll give it a try. The code do tell a lot especially newbie like me. –  Grace Dec 9 '11 at 7:17
    
Hi yb007, I tried your code, but it seem can't grep file with ext .def only, could you help to add the section in? I'm not sure how to edit to make it works. ALso, appreciate if you could explain to me, what is these lines do "my %second = map {$_=>1} @files_def; my @same = grep { $second{$_} } @files_abc; " Thanks! –  Grace Dec 12 '11 at 3:59
    
Yippee... I finally found it by swapping the parameter.. thanks yb007! –  Grace Dec 12 '11 at 6:44
    
Hi yb007, I tested my code which amend from your sample code but found there's a bug which I don;t know how to fix. I editted my code as shown above.. could you pls help me to take a look where goes wrong? Thanks! –  Grace Dec 13 '11 at 16:28
    
I have edited the script.Slight change in the regex.Modify the script as per your requirement –  yb007 Dec 14 '11 at 5:53

ALWAYS add

use strict;
use warnings;

to the head of your program. They will catch most simple errors before you need to ask for help.

  • You should always check whether a file open succeeded with open FILE, "reflog" or die $!;
  • You are using a variable $ine that doesn't exist. You mean $line
  • The lines you read into the array contain a trailing newline. Write chomp @lines; to remove them
  • Your regular expressions are wrong and you need || instead of &&. Instead write if ($line =~ /\.(iif|isp)$/)

If you still have problems when these are fixed then please ask again.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out those mistakes. What you pointed out is true but it's my typo that cause the error here when I retyped. My actual script is working just that it can't capture the right data for me since in the reflog file, the file1.abc and file1.def is not sitting on same line. Could you help? By the way, thanks for pointing out ($line =~ /\.(iif|isp)$/), I should use this format in future .. looks more tidy .. .. But my question is still unanswered. :( –  Grace Dec 9 '11 at 5:34
    
Just tried out the chomp, I put it here:- "foreach my $line (chomp @lines) {" but surprisingly it do something that I get very weird result, like suppresing most of the list from my input file. So I give up using chomp... not sure why it is so. –  Grace Dec 9 '11 at 6:22
    
For your sample of using pipe to work as an or command at here (iif|isp), may I know what is the alternative method of way of writing in I want the "and" condition (instead of doing $line =~ /\.iif && $line =~ /\.isp)? –  Grace Dec 29 '11 at 6:26

Aside from the errors already pointed out, you appear to be loading @lines from FUNC instead of FILE. Is that also a typo?

Also, If reflog truly contains a series of lines with one filename on each line, why would you ever expect the conditional "if ($line =~ /.abc/ && $line =~ /.def/)" to evaluate true?

It would really help if you could post an example from the actual file you are reading from, along with the actual code you are debugging. Or at least edit the question to fix the typos already mentioned

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you are right, my "if ($line =~ /.abc/ && $line =~ /.def/)" definitely not working as it is logically wrong, since the reflog contains a series of line only one filename on each line. That is the problem I face that's why open the question right here. Do you have any idea to resolve? Thanks –  Grace Dec 9 '11 at 6:03
    
The problem is you are not preserving any information from earlier lines, after moving to the next loop. The solution depends on the requirements (the expected / guaranteed structure of the input file). If your file is guaranteed to be sorted, such that fileX.abc and fileX.def will always appear on consecutive lines, then you can simply store the $last line and compare alongside the $current line. –  scotinus Dec 9 '11 at 6:17
    
The objective of the script is to check for the existance of both file1.abc and file1.def. Thus it is not guarantee that if same filename will appear for both extentions, so the method you suggested is not suitable here. :(. May any else option I can take? –  Grace Dec 9 '11 at 6:21
    
A more complex way would be to parse the file and build a hash with the base name as key and and an array reference as value. Add each extension to the appropriate array as found. When you've parse all lines, read through each key of the hash and make your decisions based on the array elements found. –  scotinus Dec 9 '11 at 6:28
    
Er... may I know how to parse the file reflog to build hash? I tried defined hash before but don't know how to parse the value from a file into hash. Could you give me an example please? –  Grace Dec 9 '11 at 6:45

You don't need to slurp the whole file; you can read one line at a time. I think this code works on this extended version of your reflog file:

xx.pl

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

open my $file, '<', "reflog" or die "Failed to open file reflog for reading ($!)";
open my $func, '>', 'log'    or die "Failed to create file log for writing ($!)";

my ($oldline, $oldname, $oldextn) = ("", "", "");
while (my $newline = <$file>)
{
    chomp $newline;
    $newline =~ s/^\s*//;
    my ($newname, $newextn) = ($newline =~ m/(.*)([.][^.]*)$/);
    if ($oldname eq $newname)
    {
        # Found the same file - presumably $oldextn eq ".abc" and $newextn eq ".def"
        print $func "$newname\n";
        print "$newname\n";
        $oldline = "";
        $oldname = "";
        $oldextn = "";
    }
    else
    {
        print $func "$oldline\n" if ($oldline);
        print "$oldline\n" if ($oldline);
        $oldline = $newline;
        $oldname = $newname;
        $oldextn = $newextn;
    }
}
print $func "$oldline\n" if ($oldline);
print "$oldline\n" if ($oldline);

#unlink "reflog" ;
chmod 0644, "log";
close $func;
close $file;

Since the code does not actually check the extensions, it would be feasible to omit $oldextn and $newextn; on the other hand, you might well want to check the extensions if you're sufficiently worried about the input format to need to deal with leading white space.

I very seldom find it good for a processing script like this to remove its own input, hence I've left unlink "reflog"; commented out; your mileage may vary. I would also often just read from standard input and write to standard output; that would simplify the code quite a bit. This code writes to both the log file and to standard output; obviously, you can omit either output stream. I was too lazy to write a function to handle the writing, so the print statements come in pairs.

This is a variant on control-break reporting.

reflog

file1.abc
file1.def
file2.abc
file2.def
file3.abc
file3.def
file4.abc
file5.abc
file5.def
file6.def
file7.abc

Output

$ perl xx.pl
file1
file2
file3
file4.abc
file5
file6.def
file7.abc
$ cat log
file1
file2
file3
file4.abc
file5
file6.def
file7.abc
$ 

To handle unsorted file names with blank lines

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

open my $file, '<', "reflog" or die "Failed to open file reflog for reading ($!)";
open my $func, '>', 'log'    or die "Failed to create file log for writing ($!)";

my @lines;

while (<$file>)
{
    chomp;
    next if m/^\s*$/;
    push @lines, $_;
}

@lines = sort @lines;

my ($oldline, $oldname, $oldextn) = ("", "", "");
foreach my $newline (@lines)
{
    chomp $newline;
    $newline =~ s/^\s*//;
    my ($newname, $newextn) = ($newline =~ m/(.*)([.][^.]*)$/);
    if ($oldname eq $newname)
    {
        # Found the same file - presumably $oldextn eq ".abc" and $newextn eq ".def"
        print $func "$newname\n";
        print "$newname\n";
        $oldline = "";
        $oldname = "";
        $oldextn = "";
    }
    else
    {
        print $func "$oldline\n" if ($oldline);
        print "$oldline\n" if ($oldline);
        $oldline = $newline;
        $oldname = $newname;
        $oldextn = $newextn;
    }
}
print $func "$oldline\n" if ($oldline);
print "$oldline\n" if ($oldline);

#unlink "reflog" ;
chmod 0644, "log";
close $func;
close $file;

This is very similar to the original code I posted. The new lines are these:

my @lines;

while (<$file>)
{
    chomp;
    next if m/^\s*$/;
    push @lines, $_;
}

@lines = sort @lines;

my ($oldline, $oldname, $oldextn) = ("", "", "");    # Old
foreach my $newline (@lines)

This reads the 'reflog' file, skipping blank lines, saving the rest in the @lines array. When the lines are all read, they're sorted. Then, instead of a loop reading from the file, the new code reads entries from the sorted array of lines. The rest of the processing is as before. For your described input file, the output is:

file1
file2
file3

Urgh: the chomp $newline; is not needed, though it is not otherwise harmful. The old-fashioned chop (a precursor to chomp) would have been dangerous. Score one for modern Perl.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much Jonathan Leffler, your code do help me a lot, I'll try on it. :) –  Grace Dec 9 '11 at 7:19
    
May I know what is this means-->my ($newname, $newextn) = ($newline =~ m/(.*)([.][^.]*)$/); ? –  Grace Dec 9 '11 at 7:33
    
Of course you may...it assigns the two captures in the regular expression to the two variables. See Regexp Quote-like Operators and especially the section on 'Matching in a list context'; the my($n1, $n2) notation provides a list context. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 9 '11 at 7:57
    
Hi Jonathan Leffler, I tried your script and it works perect for my testcase(which is same as your sample input file above) but I somehow don't know how to apply in my actual script at last since that even I told you that my input file is sorted, but it is sorted in a way that not all file*.abc is followed by same file*def due to some numeric prblm. Susch as the input file will be aorted in a way like file01.abc, file02.abc then only file1.def and file2.def. The numeric "01" and "02" take precedence here compare to teh extention. –  Grace Dec 12 '11 at 7:36
    
ALso, due to chomp prblm, I some how have one line extra in each of the listed input file which I dunno how to eliminate. Tried and I dunno how to make those things clear and thus I gave up for time constraint. ANyway.. I really really appreciate your help and believe I can use this as guideline for my future needed. Thanks again! –  Grace Dec 12 '11 at 7:36
open( FILE, "reflog" );
open( FUNC, '>log' );
my %seen;
while ( chomp( my $line = <FILE> ) ) {
    $line =~ s/^\s*//;
    if ( $ine =~ /(\.+)\.(abc|def)$/ ) {
        $seen{$1}++;
    }
}

foreach my $file ( keys %seen ) {
    if ( $seen{$file} > 1 ) {
        ## do whatever you want to
    }
}
unlink "reflog";
chmod( 0750, "log" );
close(FUNC);
close(FILE);
share|improve this answer
1  
reading from a filehandle that was opened for writing is not going to work! –  tadmc Dec 9 '11 at 14:03
    
Thanks Pradeep, I have had got my script works with the helps for those who replied to the questions, esp yb007 and Jonathan Leffler. Will treat this as a guide for future use. Thanks! –  Grace Dec 12 '11 at 7:24

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