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My compiler(gcc) is showing the warning

#include<stdio.h>

struct s{
     unsigned char *p;
};

int main() {
    struct s a = {"??/??/????"}; //warning
    printf("%s",a.p);
    return 0;
}

warning: pointer targets in initialization differ in signedness

please help me to why is this warning comes.

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2  
String literals are not of type unsigned char*. –  Seth Carnegie Dec 9 '11 at 5:17
    
@SethCarnegie - I was about to post that as the answer after editing his post (which Mystical beat me to) - do so and I'll upvote –  Brian Roach Dec 9 '11 at 5:18
    
@BrianRoach ok, thanks. –  Seth Carnegie Dec 9 '11 at 5:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

String literals are not of type unsigned char*.

You probably meant to type const char* in your struct. If not, you probably do not want to assign a string literal to it without making it const, because it is illegal to modify the memory in which string literals reside.

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As @Seth Carnegie said, string literals are of type char*, not unsigned char*. So you can avoid this warning with an explicit type cast. i.e.

#include<stdio.h>

struct s{
     unsigned char *p;
};

int main() {
    struct s a = {(unsigned char *)"?""?/?""?/????"}; // no warning
    printf("%s",a.p);
    return 0;
}

Edit: Changed string literal to remove the possible trigraph

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3  
??/ is the trigraph for \ . That means that the string will come out to be "\\????", so with the '\' escaped, it becomes "\????". I don't know if trigraphs are replaced inside string literals though so all that may be wrong. +1 for spotting it. –  Seth Carnegie Dec 9 '11 at 5:23
2  
Gotta watch out for trigraphs, because "wtf??!" will turn in to "wtf|". It's an old construct from a bygone era of keyboards that were missing certain keys. –  Chris Dec 9 '11 at 5:27
    
@Chris so then they are replaced inside string literals? –  Seth Carnegie Dec 9 '11 at 5:30
    
Just read up on them. gcc only does trigraph substitution if you specify one of the -trigraph, -ansi, or -std options. I have updated the code sample above to avoid the issue entirely –  Sodved Dec 9 '11 at 5:33
    
Actually I'm not entirely clear on that one. I never use them myself. I believe they're replaced everywhere (it's rather hard to write a program if you're missing the semicolon key -- trigraphs had better work outside of strings as well as within). –  Chris Dec 9 '11 at 5:33

There may be some cases when change the compiler options should be a reasonable way to solve that.

An example:

You have an API with some prototype like this:

void Display (unsigned char * Text); 

and you want call like this:

Display ("Some text");

You may get the same warning ("pointer targets in passing argument 1 of 'Display' differ in signedness").

This warning is due the flag -Wpointer-sign that, quoting GNU compiler reference, "...is implied by -Wall and by -pedantic, which can be disabled with -Wno-pointer-sign".

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Change unsigned char * type to const char*.

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