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I have a Backbone Model:

class DateTimeSelector extends Backbone.Model

  initialize: ->
    @bind 'change:date', @updateDatetime
    @bind 'change:time', @updateDatetime

  updateDatetime: =>
    # do some stuff with the sate and time

And I have some tests for that code using jasmin and sinon.js

describe "DateTimeSelector", ->
  beforeEach ->
    @datetime = new DateTimeSelector()

    describe "updateDatetime", ->
      beforeEach ->
        @updateSpy = sinon.spy(@datetime, 'updateDatetime')

      afterEach ->
        @datetime.updateDatetime.restore()

      # passes
      it "should be called when we call it", ->
        @datetime.updateDatetime()
        expect(@updateSpy).toHaveBeenCalledOnce()

      # fails
      it "should be called when we trigger it", ->
        @datetime.trigger 'change:date'
        expect(@updateSpy).toHaveBeenCalled()

      # fails
      it "should be called when we set the date", ->
        @datetime.set { date: new Date() }
        expect(@updateSpy).toHaveBeenCalled()

It seems to work when I use it in the browser but I can't seem to get the tests to pass. Can anyone enlighten me?

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You may want to retag to include coffeescript. I would have added it for you but you're maxed at 5 and I didn't want to decide which one to replace for you. –  Kai Dec 9 '11 at 6:18
    
Yeah I never know what to do in this situation. The question is written in Coffee obviously, but the problem and solution are (most likely) not coffeescript related. So I don't know if it correct to tag as coffeescript. –  David Tuite Dec 9 '11 at 6:43
    
Well I looked at this question because it was tagged JS; but I'm unable to help because the example is coffeescript which I don't use myself. So I thought a coffeescript tag might attract other coffeescript users, who could more easily read and understand your example. :) –  Kai Dec 9 '11 at 6:57
    
It seems you test the wrong thing here. In most of the case it's not a good idea to spy on the class you want to test. In your case you have to test if the result of @updateDatetime is the one you expected, not if it called, cause this is the functionality you get from backbone and you must trust them that they've test their stuff. –  Andreas Köberle Dec 10 '11 at 16:27
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2 Answers 2

up vote 26 down vote accepted

duckyfuzz, you are experiencing this problem because when you are creating the spy (which actually wraps the original function and creates a level of indirection to insert its services of tracking method invocation) the binding of the events has already taken place. Which means that even though the spy wrapped the original function the event binding references the original function and not the wrapped spy. Hence, when you test, the original function gets executed on the event trigger but the spy tracking is one level above and is not executed.

To make sure that the event binding is actually pointing to the wrapped spy function you have to create the spy before create the model object (same goes if you are testing views). To do that create the spy on the prototype."method" of the class:

in the beforeEach -> section before @datetime = new DateTimeSelector() create the spy: @updateSpy = sinon.spy(DateTimeSelector.prototype, 'updateDatetime')

be sure to change your afterEach -> section where you return the prototype back to normal, like so: @updateSpy.restore()

this should be your code:

describe "DateTimeSelector", ->
  beforeEach ->
    @updateSpy = sinon.spy(DateTimeSelector.prototype, 'updateDatetime')
    @datetime = new DateTimeSelector()

  afterEach ->
    @updateSpy.restore()

  # passes
  it "should be called when we call it", ->
    @datetime.updateDatetime()
    expect(@updateSpy).toHaveBeenCalledOnce()

  # should pass now
  it "should be called when we trigger it", ->
    @datetime.trigger 'change:date'
    expect(@updateSpy).toHaveBeenCalled()

  # should pass now
  it "should be called when we set the date", ->
    @datetime.set { date: new Date() }
    expect(@updateSpy).toHaveBeenCalled() 

BTW, if you are using jasmin-sinon.js plugin then your syntax is fine

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That was exactly my problem. Thanks. –  EndangeredMassa Apr 12 '12 at 22:59
    
Ran into the exact same issue, thanks for the correct code sample! –  makerberg Jul 17 '12 at 8:16
2  
I would vote up twice if I could :) –  Jonathan Lin Nov 15 '12 at 15:53
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You're mixing the mocking syntax of jasmine and sinon together.

In your passing test your sinon spy exposes the property calledOnce but you're using a jasmine-esque function toHaveBeenCalledOnce(). This function doesn't exist on the sinon spy so essentially no assert is taking place.

In your failing tests you're calling the jasmine spy function toHaveBeenCalled() on your sinon spy. Jasmine has its own syntax for creating a spy: spyOn(obj, 'method');

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