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After reading lots of blogs, forum entries and several Apple docs, I still don't know whether extensive subclassing in Objective-C is a wise thing to do or not.

Take for example the following case:

Say I'm developing a puzzle game which has a lot of elements. All of those elements share a certain amount of the same behaviour. Then, within my collection of elements, different groups of elements share equal behaviour, distinguishing groups from groups, etc...

So, after determining what inherits from what, I decided to subclass out of oblivion. And why shouldn't I? Considering the ease tweaking general behaviour takes with this model, I think I accomplished something OOP is meant for.

But, - and this is the source of my question - Apple mentions using delegates, data source methods, and informal protocols in favour of subclassing. It really boggles my mind why?

There seem to be two camps. Those in favor of subclassing, those in fafor of not. It depends on personal taste apparently. I'm wondering what the pros and cons are of subclassing massively and not subclassing massively?

To wrap it up, my question is simple: Am I right? And why or why not?

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Kriem, Apple is talking about using Cocoa in general, not anything to do with Objective-C. For each individual project, you will have to decide how to best set up your application and codebase. In Apple's case, they have set up Cocoa (esp. AppKit/UIKit) using MVC and IoC paradigms, so they suggest that you do not subclass things like NSControl, etc. yourself when you could use delegates instead. To sum up: this warning is specifically for the Cocoa framework, not for Objecive-C in general. –  Jason Coco May 9 '09 at 23:16
    
@Jason: This is a pretty good answer, why leaving it as a simple comment? –  mouviciel May 9 '09 at 23:26
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Objective-C without Cocoa? I'm sure there are nearly five people in the world who use that. –  Chuck May 10 '09 at 6:58
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@Kriem - Chuck probably just means that most people use Objective-C with Cocoa, but that's still not the point. Feel free to design your game/puzzle/whatever with lots of subclassing if that works best for your solution. The Cocoa framework itself was designed so that subclassing isn't necessary, that's all. –  Jason Coco May 10 '09 at 12:18
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This question has been around for years, but it seems the most obvious problem with a deep hierarchy isn't mentioned. The world is rarely as cleanly divided as the question implies. What do you do when you have an element that works a little like subclass A and a little like subclass B? If you already have a deep hierarchy when you discover this component, it's a real PITA to deal with. –  Daniel T. Oct 17 '12 at 12:05

9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Personally, I follow this rule: I can create a subclass if it respects the Liskov substitution principle.

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Good piece of information. I think it applies to my case. But, - and this is the source of my question - Apple mentions using delegates, data source methods, and informal protocols in favour of subclassing. It really boggles my mind why? - I'll edit the question to stress this out. –  Kriem May 9 '09 at 22:39
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I suspect that it is much simpler to use delegates in most cases, hence the Apple recommendation. Subclassing may be appropriate, but it would be harder to get right. Just my opinion. –  Martin Cote May 10 '09 at 2:51
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I think that definition is awfully generic. If you read through the mathese, what it's basically saying is that anything that uses the superclass already should be able to use the subclass without change. So instead of helping to understand when to have a subclass, it's simply stating you should keep subclasses from breaking a class. That definition also totally eliminates whole common categories of subclasses - like abstract superclasses that are never meant to be used directly, only subclassed... –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner May 10 '09 at 5:51
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@Kendall - That's not really true. Those categories are certainly not eliminated by this approach. NSArray is designed this way - as an abstract class with unknown, substituted subclasses as actual implementations. –  Jason Coco May 10 '09 at 12:21

Delegation is a means of using the composition technique to replace some aspects of coding you would otherwise subclass for. As such, it boils down to the age old question of the task at hand needing one large thing that knows how to do a lot, or if you have a loose network of specialized objects (a very UNIX sort of model of responsibility).

Using a combination of delegates and protocols (to define what the delegates are supposed to be able to do) provides a great deal of flexibility of behavior and ease of coding - going back to that Liskov substitution principle, when you subclass you have to be careful you don't do anything a user of the whole class would find unexpected. But if you are simply making a delegate object then you have much less to be responsible for, only that the delegate methods you implement do what that one protocol calls for, beyond that you don't care.

There are still many good reasons to use subclasses, if you truly have shared behavior and variables between a number of classes it may make a lot of sense to subclass. But if you can take advantage of the delegate concept you'll often make your classes easier to extend or use in ways you the designer may not have expected.

I tend to be more of a fan of formal protocols than informal ones, because not only do formal protocols make sure you have the methods a class treating you as a delegate expect, but also because the protocol definition is a natural place to document what you expect from a delegate that implements those methods.

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Subclassing has it's benefits, but it also has some drawbacks. As a general rule, I try to avoid implementation inheritance and instead use interface inheritance and delegation.

One of the reasons I do this is because when you inherit implementation, you can wind up with problems if you override methods but don't adhere to their (sometimes undocumented contract). Additionally, I find walking class hierarchies with implementation inheritance difficult because methods can be overridden or implemented at any level. Finally, when subclassing you can only widen an interface, you can't narrow it. This leads to leaky abstractions. A good example of this is java.util.Stack which extends java.util.Vector. I shouldn't be able to treat a stack as a Vector. Doing so only allows the consumer to run around the interface.

Others have mentioned the Liskov Substitution Principle. I think that using that would have certainly cleared up the java.util.Stack problem but it can also lead to very deep class hierarchies in order to put ensure that classes get only the methods they are supposed to have.

Instead, with interface inheritance there is essentially no class hierarchy because interfaces rarely need to extend one another. The classes simply implement the interfaces that they need to and can therefore be treated in the correct way by the consumer. Additionally, because there is no implementation inheritance, consumers of these classes won't infer their behavior due to previous experience with a parent class.

In the end though, it doesn't really matter which way you go. Both are perfectly acceptable. It's really more a matter of what you're more comfortable with and what the frameworks that you're working with encourage. As the old saying goes: "When in Rome do as Romans do."

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There's nothing wrong with using inheritance in Objective-C. Apple uses it quite a bit. For instance, in Cocoa-touch, the inheritance tree of UIButton is UIControl : UIView : UIResponder : NSObject.

I think Martin hit on an important point in mentioning the Liskov substitution principle. Also, proper use of inheritance requires that the implementer of the subclass has a deep knowledge of the super class. If you've ever struggled to extend a non-trivial class in a complex framework, you know that there's always a learning curve. In addition, implementation details of the super class often "leak through" to the subclass, which is a big pain in the @$& for framework builders.

Apple chose to use delegation in many instances to address these problems; non-trivial classes like UIApplication expose common extension points through a delegate object so most developers have both an easier learning curve and a more loosely coupled way to add application specific behavior -- extending UIApplication directly is rarely necessary.

In your case, for your application specific code, use which ever techniques you're comfortable with and work best for your design. Inheritance is a great tool when used appropriately.

I frequently see application programmers draw lessons from framework designs and trying to apply them to their application code (this is common in Java, C++ and Python worlds as well as Objective-C). While it's good to think about and understand the choices framework designers made, those lessons don't always apply to application code.

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In general you should avoid subclassing API classes if there exist delegates, etc that accomplish what you want to do. In your own code subclassing is often nicer, but it really does depend on your goals, eg. if you're providing an API you should provide a delegate based API rather than assuming subclassing.

When dealing with APIs subclassing has more potential bugs -- eg. if any class in the class hierarchy gets a new method that has the same name as your addition you make break stuff. And also, if you're providing a useful/helper type function there's a chance that in the future something similar will be added to the actual class you were subclassing, and that might be more efficient, etc but your override will hide it.

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I really think it depends on what you're trying to do. If the puzzle game you describe in the example really does have a set of unique elements that share common attributes, and there's no provided classes - say, for example, "NSPuzzlePiece" - that fit your needs, then I don't see a problem with subclassing extensively.

In my experience, delegates, data source methods, and informal protocols are much more useful when Apple has provided a class that already does something close to what you want it to do.

For example, say you're building an app that uses a table. There is (and I speak here of the iPhone SDK, since that's where I have experience) a class UITableView that does all the little niceties of creating a table for interaction with the user, and it's much more efficient to define a data source for an instance of UITableView than it is to completely subclass UITableView and redefine or extend its methods to customize its behavior.

Similar concepts go for delegates and protocols. If you can fit your ideas into Apple's classes, then it's usually easier (and will work more smoothly) to do so and use data source, delegates, and protocols than it is to create your own subclasses. It helps you avoid extra work and wasting time, and is usually less error-prone. Apple's classes have taken care of the business of making functions efficient and debugging; the more you can work with them, the fewer mistakes your program will have in the long run.

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Please read the Apple documentation "Adding behavior to a Cocoa program"!. Under "Inheriting from a Cocoa class" section, see the 2nd paragraph. Apple clearly mentions that Subclassing is the primary way of adding application specific behavior to the framework (please note, FRAMEWORK).
MVC pattern does not completely disallow the use of subclasses or subtypes. Atleast I have not seen this recommendation from either Apple or others (if I have missed please feel free to point me to the right source of information about this). If you are subclassing api classes only within your application, please go ahead, no one's stopping you but do take care that it does not break the behavior of the class/api as a whole. Subclassing is great way of extending the framework api's functionality. We see a lot of subclassing within the Apple IOS framework APIs too. As a developer one has to take care the implementation is well documented and not duplicated accidentally by another developer. Its another ball game altogether if your application is a set of API classes that you plan to distribute as reusable component.

IMHO, rather than asking around what the best practice is, first read the related documentation thoroughly, implement and test it. Make your own judgement. You know best about what you're up to. It's easy for others (like me and so many others) to just read stuff from different sources on the Net and throw around terms. Be your own judge, it has worked for me so far.

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my impression of ADC's emphasis 'against' subclassing has more to do with the legacy of how the operating system has evolved... back in the day (Mac Classic aka os9) when c++ was the primary interface to most of the mac toolbox, subclassing was the de-facto standard in order for a programmer to modify the behaviour of commonplace OS features (and this was indeed sometimes a pain in the neck and meant that one had to be very careful that any and all modifications behaved predictably and didn't break any standard behaviour).

this being said, MY IMPRESSION of ADC's emphasis against subclassing is not putting forth a case for designing an application's class hierarchy without inheritance, BUT INSTEAD to point out that in the new way of doing things (ie OSX) there are in most cases more appropriate means to go about customizing standard behavior without needing to subclass.

So, by all means, design your puzzle program's architecture as robustly as you can, leveraging inheritance as you see fit!

looking forward to seeing your cool new puzzle application!

|K<

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This is an interesting idea, but in fact the major design principles of Cocoa were established well before C++ became a common programming language for Mac OS. Cocoa gets it's emphasis on delegation and composition from NEXTSTEP, which was designed that way because the folks in charge thought that composition was a more reliable way to build large software systems out of reusable components. And that idea really goes all the way back to Smalltalk, and the Model-View-Conroller desgign pattern. –  Mark Bessey May 15 '09 at 6:15
    
There's also some element of the painful lessons of fragile base classes that were learned in the Taligent project. That was a joint Apple-IBM project which, in part, tried to create an overall framework for developing apps. Their People, Places and Things metaphor is worth studying just for insight into framework design. That project was probably the biggest demonstration of how C++ fails as a language for fundamental framework design (I say that as a professional C++ developer). –  Andy Dent Jul 24 '13 at 23:02
    
Minor correction, C++ was never the primary interface to most of the MacOS Toolbox. It was always C and Pascal. –  St3fan Jan 16 at 1:05

Apple indeed appears to passively discourage subclassing with Objective-C.

It is an axiom of OOP design to Favor composition over implementation.

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