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I have three activities in my app. I want to keep the screen awake when it is in the second activity. The screen should not go off in my second activity unless the "lock" key is pressed manually. I went through many links but they seem unclear to me.

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See detail answer here... stackoverflow.com/questions/5712849/… –  Nepster Jun 17 at 11:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 59 down vote accepted

You can do this a couple of ways. You can set the FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON on the activity's window:

getWindow().addFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON);

Another way is to use a wake lock:

mWakeLock = getContext().getSystemService(Context.POWER_SERVICE)
    .newWakeLock(PowerManager.SCREEN_BRIGHT_WAKE_LOCK, getClass().getName());

The manifest will have to include this line in your manifest:

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.WAKE_LOCK"/>
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works perfect! thanks! –  user838522 Dec 9 '11 at 7:11
3  
The first choice is much better... don't use a wake lock!! It requires an additional permission in the manifest! stackoverflow.com/a/2134602/844882 –  Alex Lockwood Dec 2 '12 at 16:14
6  
@AlexLockwood - For OP's application, the first approach is better. However, it is wrong to adopt a policy of "don't use a wake lock!" A wake lock provides more control over screen-on status. When the activity only requires the screen to be kept on during short periods, the wake lock can be released, saving battery life. With the first approach, the screen is kept on for the entire time the activity is in the foreground. Also, the first approach cannot be used by a Service performing work on behalf of an activity. –  Ted Hopp Dec 2 '12 at 16:44
    
Yeah, sorry... there are situations where it is correct to use a wake lock. But if you simply want to keep the screen on for the duration of an activity's life cycle, the first choice is better. –  Alex Lockwood Dec 2 '12 at 17:26
    
Nice explanation, thank you! –  Marcelo Filho Apr 29 at 13:02

I find this solution much easier:

<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" // Whatever your layout is
    ...
    android:keepScreenOn="true"> // Add this line

Just add this to your activity layout XML.

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3  
That's nice and clean. –  OneWorld Aug 27 '13 at 15:24

As per I understand your question, I think you have to use WAKE_LOCK for it in your application.

Something like,

final PowerManager pm = (PowerManager) getSystemService(Context.POWER_SERVICE);
mWakeLock = pm.newWakeLock(PowerManager.SCREEN_BRIGHT_WAKE_LOCK | PowerManager.ON_AFTER_RELEASE,"");    
mWakeLock.acquire();

And in your application's manifest.xml file file add this,

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.WAKE_LOCK" />
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this works too..thanks! –  user838522 Dec 9 '11 at 7:12

try to use this

getWindow().addFlags(
                        WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_FULLSCREEN
                                | WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON);
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Can you add a little bit more clarification as to how your solution solves the problem? It will help the OP to better understand your solution. –  KLee1 Nov 14 '12 at 18:19

This code is deprecated, use this instead:

PowerManager pm = (PowerManager) getSystemService(Context.POWER_SERVICE);
wl = pm.newWakeLock(PowerManager.SCREEN_DIM_WAKE_LOCK, "My Tag");
wl.acquire();

After you finish with usage, call (best solution is to call this method in onDestroy method of some activity):

wl.release();

More about this on this link

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PowerManager.SCREEN_DIM_WAKE_LOCK was deprecated in favor of WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON in API Level 17. –  bowmanb Nov 26 '13 at 20:00

Here is the official reference

http://developer.android.com/training/scheduling/wakelock.html

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2  
Don't you think, it should be a comment over the question as it's just a doc reference. –  Paresh Mayani Feb 24 at 18:30

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