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I have an existing SQL query that works fine in SQL Server, that I would like to make work in MySQL. I have cleaned it up a bit, and fiddled with the back-ticks for column / table names, etc. but cannot get it to work.

Here is the statement in question:

SELECT `EmployeeID`
FROM `Employee`
WHERE
(
   (
      SELECT COUNT(*) AS A
      FROM `TimeClock`
      WHERE (`EmployeeID` = `Employee.EmployeeID`)
         AND (`InOut` = 'True')
   ) > (
      SELECT COUNT(*) AS B
      FROM `TimeClock` AS `TimeClock_1`
      WHERE (`EmployeeID` = `Employee.EmployeeID`)
         AND (`InOut` = 'False')
   )
)

This should return any EmployeeID's that have more InOut = True than InOut = False in the TimeClock table.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
whats the error you getting ? –  Zohaib Dec 9 '11 at 7:37
    
Error: Unknown column 'Employee.EmployeeID' in 'where clause' –  Fuginator Dec 9 '11 at 7:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should provide you with the EmployeeId values where there are more values of InOut True than False

SELECT e.EmployeeId
FROM Employee AS e
INNER JOIN
(
   SELECT tc.EmployeeID
      , SUM(CASE
               WHEN tc.InOut = 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0
            END) AS InOutTrue
      , SUM(CASE
               WHEN tc.InOut = 0 THEN 1 ELSE 0
            END) AS InOutFalse
   FROM TimeClock AS tc
   GROUP BY tc.EmployeeId
) AS t ON e.EmployeeId = t.EmployeeId
WHERE t.InOutTrue > t.InOutFalse

The two alternatives I came up with show similar performance on my VERY SMALL unindexed test data. I would recommend you test them against your own data to see if they make any difference:

This one is pretty much the same, but using total record count instead of InOutFalse.

SELECT e.EmployeeId
FROM Employee AS e
INNER JOIN
(
   SELECT tc.EmployeeID
      , COUNT(1) AS RecordCount
      , SUM(CASE
               WHEN tc.InOut = 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0
            END) AS InOutTrue
   FROM TimeClock AS tc
   GROUP BY tc.EmployeeId
) AS t ON e.EmployeeId = t.EmployeeId
WHERE t.InOutTrue > RecordCount - t.InOutTrue

I am not sure if MySQL will require the CAST I used here, but SQL Server did. (That is what I tested these with) It could not perform a SUM on a BIT column.

SELECT e.EmployeeId
FROM Employee AS e
INNER JOIN TimeClock AS tc ON e.EmployeeId = tc.EmployeeId
GROUP BY e.EmployeeId
HAVING SUM(CAST(tc.InOut AS INT)) > (COUNT(1) - SUM(CAST(tc.InOut AS INT)))

If all three perform similarly, it then comes down to personal preference.

share|improve this answer
    
Humm, I get zero rows back on a table that I know EmployeeID 1 has more InOut's true than false... (sample data has 10 True, 9 False) –  Fuginator Dec 9 '11 at 7:46
    
Reducing the code above to just the inner select, and running that returns employeeid's with zero for bock InOutTrue and InOutFalse, if that helps... –  Fuginator Dec 9 '11 at 7:49
    
@Fuginator What is the DataType for InOut? Is it actually a string, or a bool? Also, are there any other values for InOut than True or False? –  Adam Wenger Dec 9 '11 at 7:50
    
Changed 'True' and 'False' in the CASE statments to 1 and 0 - everything works! –  Fuginator Dec 9 '11 at 7:51
    
DataType is BINARY, FYI. –  Fuginator Dec 9 '11 at 7:51

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