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I'd like to know how to write the accumulator example included in the Revenge of the Nerds essay. It's easy to understand how it works, however I fail to recreate it in Clojure - it doesn't accumulate but just returns the sum of i and the initial given value of n.

The key is in incf (in the Common Lisp version) or += (in JavaScript).

In other words: how to alter the state of a referenced function? I've seen some examples on mutating variables but they don't look precisely pretty do they?

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Btw, throw that wikibook in the trash. The examples section doesn't look bad as I read over it now, but the "main" page is outdated and wasn't very good when it was new. – amalloy Dec 9 '11 at 8:36
    
Or, even better, one could improve it at some point. Really liking your site -4clojure.com- btw! – vemv Dec 9 '11 at 8:48
up vote 20 down vote accepted

Don't doooo itttttt! Save yourself before it's too late! Mutating state for no reason is not something Clojure encourages, so of course it's not as convenient as it would be in common lisp.

But seriously, this is a classical example for explaining closures, and while it isn't one that really is very useful in Clojure, it's nice to know the translation. You would have to write something like:

(defn foo [n]
  (let [acc (atom n)]
    (fn [i] (swap! acc + i))))
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Judging by the slightly wordy code Clojure seems to lend itself to -at times-, Mutating state for no reason is not something Clojure encourages, so of course it's not as convenient as it would be in common lisp seems quite true to me :) but I reckon that modifying state shouldn't be that usual in the problems that typically FP is better suited to. Thanks for the answer! – vemv Dec 9 '11 at 8:38
16  
public class RebuttalDriver { public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println("Clojure is actually pretty concise."); } } – amalloy Dec 10 '11 at 7:29

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