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I have a vector doneS = [1 5 9] containing certain numbers. Further I have a matrix which could look like this: matrix = [1 2 6 0 0 9; 8 6 0 0 0 9; 2 2 0 0 5 3]. I want to remove all lines of the matrix, where the numbers in columns 1:end-1 contain any number of doneS, thus I'll get in this example: matrix = [8 6 0 0 0 9]

I already have the following two solutions to this:

for m = doneS
    matrix(any(matrix(:, 1:end-1) == m, 2), :) = [];
end

I further did find a faster solution, which first finds all indices to delete and only does the deletion once, which works faster as I tested it:

log = any(matrix(:, 1:end-1) == doneS(1), 2);
for m = doneS(2:end)
     log = log | any(matrix(:, 1:end-1) == m, 2);
end
matrix(log, :) = [];

But this still takes some time and I'm wondering if there is any faster solution to this? Thanks!

EDIT Thanks to oli for another approach! Here's a benchmark script:

rows = 2e5;
cols = 100;
doneEls = 30;

% Testingdata
doneS = int8(round(100*rand(1, doneEls)));
matrix1 = int8(round(1000*rand(rows, cols)));
matrix2 = matrix1;
matrix3 = matrix1;

tic
log = any(matrix1(:, 1:end-1) == doneS(1), 2);
for m = doneS(2:end)
    log = log | any(matrix1(:, 1:end-1) == m, 2);
end
matrix1(log, :) = [];
t1 = toc

tic
for m = doneS
   matrix2(any(matrix2(:, 1:end-1) == m, 2), :) = [];
end
t2 = toc

tic
matrix3(any(ismember(matrix3(:, 1:end-1), doneS), 2), :) = [];
t3 = toc

isequal(matrix1, matrix2, matrix3)
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the function ismember:

doneS = [1 5 9]
matrix = [1 2 6 0 0 9; 8 6 0 0 0 9; 2 2 0 0 5 3]

matrix(any(ismember(matrix(:,1:end-1),doneS),2),:)=[]
share|improve this answer
    
looks good, thanks. You just missed that I only want to check columns 1:end-1, but it's simple: matrix(any(ismember(matrix(:,1:end-1),doneS),2),:)=[]. I'm gonna benchmark it to look if it's faster :) –  tim Dec 9 '11 at 9:16
    
ok, I edited it. –  Oli Dec 9 '11 at 9:30
    
Thanks, just tested it out, and it's most of the times faster than the other approaches. It actually depends much on the input data, wether there are many mathces or not. I updated the initial post with a little benchmark script if somebody wants to test it. –  tim Dec 9 '11 at 9:33

Using unique before ismember is even faster:

t1 =
       1.9354
t2 =
      0.97107
t3 =
       0.2919
t4 =
      0.024983

.

rows = 2e5;
cols = 100;
doneEls = 30;

% Testingdata
doneS = int8(round(100*rand(1, doneEls)));
matrix1 = int8(round(1000*rand(rows, cols)));
matrix2 = matrix1;
matrix3 = matrix1;

tic
log = any(matrix1(:, 1:end-1) == doneS(1), 2);
for m = doneS(2:end)
    log = log | any(matrix1(:, 1:end-1) == m, 2);
end
matrix1(log, :) = [];
t1 = toc

tic
for m = doneS
   matrix2(any(matrix2(:, 1:end-1) == m, 2), :) = [];
end
t2 = toc

tic
matrix3(any(ismember(matrix3(:, 1:end-1), doneS), 2), :) = [];
t3 = toc


doneSu = unique(doneS);
tic
matrix3(any(ismember(matrix3(:, 1:end-1), doneSu), 2), :) = [];
t4 = toc
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Actually, when you use unique(), you could also use it before using the ismember-alternative, and than the ismember one is again faster :-) Actually, I forgot to state, that doneS is always unique :) Thus I'll stick with the ismember-alternative! –  tim Dec 9 '11 at 10:52
    
Good point. I updated the answer. –  cyborg Dec 9 '11 at 12:12

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