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I need method of lines, so that when you have method call Rows (4), a method prints four blank lines.

This is my code but it wont work, tell me what is wrong?

namespace something
{ 
  class Program 
  { 
    static void Main(string[] args) 
    { 
      Console.Write("give number: "); 
      int lines = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine()); 
      line(lines); 
      Console.WriteLine("lines end"); 
      Console.ReadKey(); 
    } 

    private static void line(int lines) 
    { 
       for (int i = 1; i <= lines; i++); 
       Console.WriteLine(" ");
    }
  } 
} 
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What is the output you get? –  Stefan Koenen Dec 9 '11 at 8:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Remove ; at the end:

for (int i = 1; i <= lines; i++);
                                ^

In this case your Console.WriteLine(" "); called only once after loop finished. Loop doing nothing.

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thanks a lot, now it works –  coodienoobie Dec 9 '11 at 8:48
3  
Hence why its always best to add function block delimiters { and } even when not needed as this type of error is easier to spot. –  ChrisBD Dec 9 '11 at 9:08
for (int i = 1; i <= lines; i++);  // note the semicolon!
  Console.WriteLine(" ");

Should be

for (int i = 1; i <= lines; i++)
  Console.WriteLine(" ");

The colon is an empty instruction in its own right. So basically your program was executing an empty instruction n times (or 'lines' times, actually), and it would write an empty line only ever once afterwards.

Interestingly, the Possible mistaken empty statement compiler warning is only displayed when you enwrap the Console.WriteLine line in brackets.

Whatever causes that, it seems like a one more good reason to use brackets, even for code blocks consisting of single instructions.

Thus I would recommend:

for (int i = 1; i <= lines; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(" ");
}
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The semi-colon on the end of your for clause is the issue. Your loop isn't doing anything.

for (int i = 1; i <= lines; i++)
  Console.WriteLine(" ");
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First of all you should check for the user input to be a number, and display an error message if it isn't. The code, like that, will throw an exception if the user inputs something that can't be parsed to an int.

Then there's the semicolon at the end of the for. That's a compiler error which I think you already noticed when trying to run it.

Apart from that, what exactly is not working? Your "line" method is printi a white space for every number, and not a line. If you want to print a blank line, use Environment.NewLine

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Your "line" method is printi a white space for every number, and not a line. - you're wrong. Console.WriteLine is not the same as Console.Write. WriteLine automatically inserts a line break at the end of the string. Also, the semicolon does not give a compiler error, just a warning, and not always (as I stated in my answer). –  Konrad Morawski Dec 9 '11 at 10:16
    
You're right, I misread it for a "Write". Oh well, nvm :) –  Matteo Mosca Dec 9 '11 at 10:24
    
I don't think anyone uses Console very often (other than for homeworks, or perhaps quick "sanity checks") ;) –  Konrad Morawski Dec 9 '11 at 10:30

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