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I have an SQL with around 50 "OR" condition and all with "Like" operator. I execute this SQL from a VB Access code.

But the query fails saying, "Expression Too Long" error (mostly I think, because it exceeds 1024 characters in the query grid.

SELECT * 
  FROM <My Database> 
 WHERE (
        [Title] = '' 
        OR [Title] = '' 
        OR [Title] = '' 
        OR [Title] = '' 
        OR [Title] = '' 
        OR [Title] = '' 
        OR [Title] = '' 
        OR [Title] = '' 
        OR [Title] = '' 
        OR [Title] = ''
       ) 
       AND (
            [TITLE] LIKE '*Afghanistan*' 
            OR [TITLE] LIKE '*Term1*' 
            OR [TITLE] LIKE '*Term2*' 
            OR [TITLE] LIKE '*Term3*' 
            OR ..<around 40 like these> 
            OR [COUNTRY] LIKE '*Country1*' 
            OR ...<around 40 like these>
           );

Any ideas or suggestions as to how to work around this issue?

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can you post the SQL of the query ? –  iDevlop Dec 9 '11 at 8:59
    
Hi iDevlp, just added the code sample.. –  user1087661 Dec 9 '11 at 9:03
1  
don't sign your posts, if you want to use your real name, change your username in the user profile page. :) –  mac Dec 9 '11 at 17:02
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Suggestions: insert parameter values into base "staging" tables (possibly in another temp database) and create seni joins to these tables using EXISTS. Use ALIKE (rather than LIKE), which always uses Standard SQL wildcard characters (%).

SELECT * 
  FROM MyTable AS m
 WHERE EXISTS (
               SELECT * 
                 FROM MyExactParams AS x
                WHERE m.Title = x.Title
              )
       AND (
            EXISTS (
                    SELECT * 
                      FROM MyPatternParams AS p
                     WHERE m.Title ALIKE '%' + p.Title + '%'
                   )
            OR EXISTS (
                       SELECT * 
                         FROM MyPatternCountries AS c
                        WHERE m.Country ALIKE '%' + c.Country + '%'
                      )
           );
share|improve this answer
    
MS-Access SQL uses * and ? as wildcards instead of the % and _ of T-SQL. –  webturner Dec 9 '11 at 9:44
1  
@webturner: you are mistaken. Take a second look, "Use ALIKE (rather than LIKE)..." –  onedaywhen Dec 9 '11 at 10:22
    
Hi onedaywhen - I just dont have words to thank you.. You are simply awesome.. Thanks to Webturner also. He solved my doubts yesterday. Thank you very much guys... –  user1087661 Dec 9 '11 at 10:27
    
So instead of using non-standard *? wildcards you can use the non standard ALIKE keyword, ain't progress wonderful. Thanks for the correction. –  webturner Dec 9 '11 at 10:32
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Firstly thank you for posting this as a seperate question to your previous one. That's the right way to do it :-)

The repeating OR [Title] = '' stuff should go, they are just clutter, you just need one of them, assuming you really need to match an empty title too.

Second, do you actually need the wildcards? If the database is designed well the field called Country should contain nothing but the name of the country, so you can just say [Country]='Afghanistan'.

If you don't need the wildcards then the IN keyword becomes useful: you can check for multiple options using [Country] IN ('Afghanistan', 'Term1', 'Term2', 'Term3')

onedaywhen's suggestion is very good (+1 from me), but I fear your code is pointing to some design problems. What are you trying to do with this code: Find everything? Validate input? Find based on user selections?

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Webturner, Thank you for your comments. They are very valuable. I just love the amount of selfless help you people are doing. To answer your question, yes.., the wild cards are actually needed. The requirement is quite complex. I have to search a string that is attached with any country or any string that came from that country. For eg. People who looked for "IPAD in ASia" from all over the world or people in Asia who looked for "IPAD". –  user1087661 Dec 9 '11 at 10:33
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