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int n, k;
int count = 0, diff;
BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
String[] input;
input = br.readLine().split(" ");
n = Integer.parseInt(input[0]);
int[] a = new int[n];
k = Integer.parseInt(input[1]);
input = br.readLine().split(" ");
for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
  a[i] = Integer.parseInt(input[i]);
     for (int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
        diff = a[j] - a[i];
        if (diff == k || -diff == k) {
           count++;
        }
     }
}
System.out.print(count);

This is a sample program where I am printing particular difference count, where n range is <=100000 Now problem is to decrease execution for this program. How can I make it better to reduce running time.

Thanks in advance for suggestions

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closed as off-topic by Raedwald, Chris, josilber, Maksym Kozlenko, Cristian Ciupitu Jul 10 at 1:49

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
"I am printing particular difference count" - you need to explain more what you are trying to achieve. –  Manish Dec 9 '11 at 10:15
1  
Can you explain a bit more what the program should do. Problem is probably that you have a nested for-loop...maybe you can optimize the whole thing if you can sort the values first somehow? Also you can use instead of if(diff == k || -diff == k) the java.lang.Math.abs() methode...i dont know if it will be faster, just looks nicer ;-) –  HectorLector Dec 9 '11 at 10:17
    
do you expect the values of the input to be unique? –  soulcheck Dec 9 '11 at 10:43
2  
This question appears to be off-topic because this probably belongs on codereview.stackexchange.com –  Chris Jul 10 at 0:10
1  
The question does not ask for general review or improvement; rather, the code has the specific problem that it's not fast enough, and the author is asking for help to make it faster. –  Warren Dew Jul 10 at 1:06

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a comparison of @Socha23's solution using HashSet, TIntIntHashSet and the original solution.

For 100,000 numbers I got the following (without the reading and parsing)

For 100 unique values, k=10

Set: 89,699,743 took 0.036 ms
Trove Set: 89,699,743 took 0.017 ms
Loops: 89,699,743 took 3623.2 ms

For 1000 unique values, k=10

Set: 9,896,049 took 0.187 ms
Trove Set: 9,896,049 took 0.193 ms
Loops: 9,896,049 took 2855.7 ms

The code

import gnu.trove.TIntIntHashMap;
import gnu.trove.TIntIntProcedure;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Random;

class Main {
    public static void main(String... args) throws Exception {
        Random random = new Random(1);
        int[] a = new int[100 * 1000];
        int k = 10;
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
            a[i] = random.nextInt(100);

        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            testSet(a, k);
            testTroveSet(a, k);
            testLoops(a, k);
        }
    }

    private static void testSet(int[] a, int k) {
        Map<Integer, Integer> readNumbers = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();
        for (int num : a) {
            Integer freq = readNumbers.get(num);
            readNumbers.put(num, freq == null ? 1 : freq + 1);
        }

        long start = System.nanoTime();
        int count = 0;
        for (Integer aNumber : readNumbers.keySet()) {
            if (readNumbers.containsKey(aNumber + k)) {
                count += (readNumbers.get(aNumber) * readNumbers.get(aNumber + k));
            }
        }
        long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
        System.out.printf("Set: %,d took %.3f ms%n", count, time / 1e6);
    }

    private static void testTroveSet(int[] a, final int k) {
        final TIntIntHashMap readNumbers = new TIntIntHashMap();
        for (int num : a)
            readNumbers.adjustOrPutValue(num, 1,1);

        long start = System.nanoTime();
        final int[] count = { 0 };
        readNumbers.forEachEntry(new TIntIntProcedure() {
            @Override
            public boolean execute(int key, int keyCount) {
                count[0] += readNumbers.get(key + k) * keyCount;
                return true;
            }
        });
        long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
        System.out.printf("Trove Set: %,d took %.3f ms%n", count[0], time / 1e6);
    }

    private static void testLoops(int[] a, int k) {
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
                int diff = a[j] - a[i];
                if (diff == k || -diff == k) {
                    count++;
                }
            }
        }
        long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
        System.out.printf("Loops: %,d took %.1f ms%n", count, time / 1e6);
    }

    private static long free() {
        return Runtime.getRuntime().freeMemory();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
great work @Peter Lawrey –  Naveen Kumar Dec 9 '11 at 12:47

Read the numbers from a file and put them in a Map (numbers as keys, their frequencies as values). Iterate over them once, and for each number check if the map contains that number with k added. If so, increase your counter. If you use a HashMap it's O(n) that way, instead of your algorithm's O(n^2).

BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
int k = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine().split(" ")[1]);
Map<Integer, Integer> readNumbers = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();

for (String aNumber : br.readLine().split(" ")) {
    Integer num = Integer.parseInt(aNumber);
    Integer freq = readNumbers.get(num);
    readNumbers.put(num, freq == null ? 1 : freq + 1);
}

int count = 0;
for (Integer aNumber : readNumbers.keySet()) {
    int freq = readNumbers.get(aNumber);
    if (k == 0) {
        count += freq * (freq - 1) / 2;
    } else if (readNumbers.containsKey(aNumber + k)) {
        count += freq * readNumbers.get(aNumber + k);
    }
}
System.out.print(count);

EDIT fixed for duplicates and k = 0

share|improve this answer
    
just change if (readNumbers.contains(aNumber + k)) to if (readNumbers.contains(aNumber + k) || readNumbers.contains(aNumber - k)) [he wants difference of k, and doesn't care which is bigger] to get +1 from me. –  amit Dec 9 '11 at 10:27
    
I'm almost sure it is not O(n), but i think it is better than OP. HashSet it is not a simple array. Anyway, +1. –  Florin Ghita Dec 9 '11 at 10:28
    
@amit he does not need that. Think twice. It'll count two times a touple. –  Florin Ghita Dec 9 '11 at 10:29
1  
@FlorinGhita: HashSet is armotorized O(n) on the average case, it decays to O(n^2) worst case, but for most cases it can be assumed as O(n). If you are worried about the worst case, the same algorithm with TreeSet instead of HashSet can achieve O(nlogn), which is still much better from O(n^2) for large input. –  amit Dec 9 '11 at 10:30
1  
@PeterLawrey, true, but with a small correction - if freq is null, put one, not zero. Updated my answer. –  socha23 Dec 9 '11 at 10:56

Since split() uses regular expressions to split a string, you should meassure whether StringTokenizer would speed up things.

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According to the API use of StringTokenizer is discouraged and new code should use String.split. Additionally the pattern being used can only match one combination (a space), so it shouldn't suffer any performance penalties. –  Dunes Dec 9 '11 at 10:25

You are trying to find elements which have difference k. Try this:

  • Sort the array.
  • You can do it in one pass after sorting by having two pointers and adjusting one of them depending on if the difference is bigger or smaller than k
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @unbeli. This solution looks good for me. I will try it out –  Naveen Kumar Dec 9 '11 at 10:31

A sparse map for the values, with their frequency of occurrence.

SortedMap<Integer, Integer> a = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    int value = input[i];
    Integer old = a.put(value, 1);
    if (old != null) {
        a.put(value, old.intValue() + 1);
    }
}
for (Map.Entry<Integer, Integer> entry : a.entrySet()) {
    Integer freq = a.get(entry.getKey() + k);
    count += entry.getValue() * freq; // N values x M values further on.
}

This O(n).

Should this be too costly, you could sort the input array and do something similar.

share|improve this answer
    
it's not O(n) as TreeMap.put is O(log n) and you have to do n puts in worst case. –  soulcheck Dec 9 '11 at 10:33
    
@soulcheck You are right O(n log n) for the filling of the map loop, and the accessing from the map loop. Still definitely much better than O(n²). I admit TreeMap might deteriorate to n² if all was sorted. HashMap would do better. –  Joop Eggen Dec 9 '11 at 10:41

I don't understand why you have one loop inside another. It's O(n^2) that way.

You also mingle reading in this array of ints with getting this count. I'd separate the two - read the whole thing in and then sweep through and get the difference count.

Perhaps I'm misunderstanding what you're doing, but it feels like you're re-doing a lot of wok in that inside loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Why was this voted down? There's another answer that came after mine that says exactly the same thing. –  duffymo Dec 9 '11 at 10:26
    
It does not contain any idea to speed up the OP code. –  Florin Ghita Dec 9 '11 at 10:32
    
Yes it does. If you separate reading from finding the difference count you effectively take the inner loop out. Now it's two O(n) loops, which is O(n). And it's a better design: two methods, each doing one thing. As written, what would you do if you had an array and wanted its difference count? You couldn't call this code, because it has reading mingled in with getting the count. –  duffymo Dec 9 '11 at 10:33

Why not use java.util.Scanner clas instead of BufferReader.

for example :-

Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in); int number = sc.nextInt();

this may work faster as their are less wrappers involved.... See this link

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Under the hood the Scanner class just wraps System.in in an InputStreamReader (it has to if it wants to read chars as System.in is a binary representation of data). Also, the overhead of an extra method call is unlikely to make much of a difference compared to that of having a nested for loop with large numbers involved. –  Dunes Dec 9 '11 at 10:33
    
nested for loop is the main problem undoubtedly. I am just trying to mention other aspects of the problem...Scanner's nextLine() with String.split() as mentioned by @Dunes can increase the efficiency even further... –  Amit Dec 9 '11 at 11:31

Use sets and maps, as other users have already explained, so I won't reiterate their suggestions again.

I will suggest something else. Stop using String.split. It compiles and uses a regular expression. String.split has this line in it: Pattern.compile(expr).split(this). If you want to split along a single character, you could write your own function and it would be much faster. I believe Guava (ex-Google collections API) has String split function which splits on characters without using a regular expression.

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