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I just noticed a weird behavior in binary serialization: when I deserialize a dictionary in my class and try to add something to it immediately, I get an error because it's not fully initialized:

[Serializable]
class Foo : ISerializable
{
    public Dictionary<int, string> Dict { get; private set; }

    public Foo()
    {
        Dict = new Dictionary<int, string>();
    }

    public Foo(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
        Dict = (Dictionary<int, string>)info.GetValue("Dict", typeof(Dictionary<int, string>));
        Dict.Add(99, "test"); // Error here
    }

    public void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
        info.AddValue("Dict", Dict);
    }

}

On the line where I add data to the dictionary, I get a NullReferenceException, but the Dict property is not null: it is instantiated, but not initialized (all its fields are 0 or null). I suspect it has only been created with FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject, but not actually deserialized yet.

I understand that at this point, perhaps it's not supposed to be fully initialized. So I tried another approach, by implementing the IDeserializationCallback interface. MSDN says:

Implement the current interface as part of support for a method that is called when deserialization of the object graph is complete.

If an object needs to execute code on its child objects, it can delay this action, implement IDeserializationCallback, and execute the code only when it is called back on this interface

So it seems to be exactly what I need, and I expected my dictionary to be be fully initialized when OnDeserialization is called... But I get the same error!

[Serializable]
class Foo : IDeserializationCallback
{
    public Dictionary<int, string> Dict { get; private set; }

    public Foo()
    {
        Dict = new Dictionary<int, string>();
    }

    public void OnDeserialization(object sender)
    {
        Dict.Add(99, "test"); // Error here
    }
}

Since the IDeserializationCallback is designed to execute code on child objects, I would expect the child objects to be fully initialized at this point. Note that if I call OnDeserialize manually on the dictionary, it works fine, but somehow I don't think I'm supposed to do that...

Is this behavior normal? Can anyone explain what's going on here?

share|improve this question
    
I have checked this, and event [OnDeserialized] attribute doesn't help. Moreover, I have checked .NET source code, and based on them everything should be initialized, when either of [OnDeserialized] or IDeserializationCallback.OnDeserialization is called –  Alexander Yezutov Dec 9 '11 at 13:07
    
OnDeserialization is called when the entire object graph is deserialized. I suspect the real problem is located in the serialization code. Can't see it from here. –  Hans Passant Dec 9 '11 at 13:17

2 Answers 2

If you add Dict.OnDeserialization(sender) to your deserialization handler, then everything becomes fine.

So, this works:

    [Serializable]
    class Foo : IDeserializationCallback
    {
        public Dictionary<int, string> Dict { get; private set; }

        public Foo()
        {
            Dict = new Dictionary<int, string>();
        }

        public void OnDeserialization(object sender)
        {
            // The dictionary is initialized with values in next line
            Dict.OnDeserialization(sender);
            Dict.Add(99, "test");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I'm aware of this, I mentioned it in my question... –  Thomas Levesque Dec 11 '11 at 22:26
    
From the source code, it looks like Dictionary post-processes its internals only after the entire object graph has been deserialized, via OnDeserialization. This hook isn't called deterministically among objects, so if your Foo requires the dictionary 'OnDeserializing' to be called, it must manually invoke the dictionary's method. It maybe be called multiple times without issue, according to the source code comment. (The invocations beyond the first results in a no-op.) Note, for the same reason, you should put a check into your Foo's OnDeserialization method to guard multiple invocations. –  Adam Klein Oct 16 at 21:28

You need to instantiate your Dictionary<> in the OnDeserialization handler

public void OnDeserialization(object sender)
{
    Dict = new Dictionary<int, string>();
    Dict.Add(99, "test"); // Error here
}
share|improve this answer
    
If I do that it won't be the dictionary I had serialized... Anyway, I think you misunderstood my question: I'm not asking how to solve the problem, I already have workarounds for it. My question is about why it behaves like this, since the documentation suggests a different behavior. –  Thomas Levesque Dec 9 '11 at 16:59

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