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A String is-a CharSequence. Many methods in the Java library accept CharSequence so they operate more generally. Some classe have a String method (for example, Writer.write(String)) and also implement Appendable with an equivalent CharSequence method (for example, Writer.append(CharSequence)).

If I am writing a class that delegates to such a class, ands needs some text input, I can choose for that input to be a String or a CharSequence. Choosing the later makes the class more flexible, by giving the client more options. But I don't see much code that does so: text arguments are almost invariably a String rather than a CharSequence. Is there a down-side to using CharSequence? Is there a performance hit? Or is it just programmer intertia or ignorance that causes use of String rather than CharSequence?

Compare

class XMLWriter {
   private final Writer writer;

   // more stuff here

   public void writeComment(String text) {
      writer.write("<!-- ");
      writer.write(text);
      writer.write(" -->");
   }
}

with

class XMLWriter {
   private final Writer writer;

   // more stuff here

   public void writeComment(CharSequence text) {
      writer.write("<!-- ");
      writer.append(text);
      writer.write(" -->");
   }
}
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Your logic makes a lot of sense to me. By using CharSequence you would allow calling code to supply a StringBuffer/StringBuilder without needing to invoke toString() on it -- which happens a lot. –  Andy Dec 9 '11 at 12:17
    
@Andy yes, I had StringBuilder in mind when I wrote the question. –  Raedwald Dec 9 '11 at 12:20
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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

As per javadoc of CharSequence

This interface does not refine the general contracts of the equals and hashCode methods. The result of comparing two objects that implement CharSequence is therefore, in general, undefined. Each object may be implemented by a different class, and there is no guarantee that each class will be capable of testing its instances for equality with those of the other. It is therefore inappropriate to use arbitrary CharSequence instances as elements in a set or as keys in a map.

Hence IMO We must think twice before using CharSequnce as a replacement for String.

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Would you say that methods that merely output text, such as my example, should use CharSequence rather than String? –  Raedwald Dec 12 '11 at 13:23
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There's two major points regarding the String class and a random implementation of the CharSequence interface:

  • String class is immutable. This means that it will never change (well the refference won't, but with this one this comes down to pretty much the same thing), is good for hashing keys, etc etc. You may want to force the user of your library to pass a String rather than a random CharSequence type when you want that text you get to have those traits
  • String is a class with special treatment in the JVM: String instances are pooled and reused. This pretty much means that if you create 10 String objects all with the value "my text", you're likely to actually have one instance of String actually created by the JVM behind the scenes. This will not work the same way with a hand-made implementation of CharSequence.
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"String instances are pooled and reused": a reason for code that wants to create text objects to create String objects, but I was asking about an API that is passed some text. –  Raedwald Dec 9 '11 at 12:33
1  
Strings are not generally pooled, only string literals and instances acquired via String.intern() are. –  Michael Borgwardt Dec 9 '11 at 12:34
    
@MichaelBorgwardt: you're right, only in particular cases are the Strings pooled. –  Shivan Dragon Dec 9 '11 at 12:51
    
@Raedwald: yes, agreed. The generic answer is : you should use the lowest type of an inheritance chain as argument type, as long as that type still has all the behaviour you need. Do you need your text to have String like behaviour (immutable, String's hashCode and equals behaviour, etc) or do you just need the text? You can go even lower and use a byte[] array to only get the binary content of the text if that's all you're interested in (and you don't care about the encoding for example). I was just pointing out those differences. –  Shivan Dragon Dec 9 '11 at 12:53
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