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Can you please tell me what I did wrong?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


void read(int *p,int n)
{
    int *q,i,j;
    q=p;
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)
        for(j=0;j<n;j++)
        {
            printf("matrix[%d][%d]=",i,j);
            scanf("%d",q);
            q=q+1;
        }
    printf("\n");
}

void alocate(int *p,int n)
{
    p=(int*)malloc(n*n*sizeof(int));
    if(p==NULL)
    {
        printf("Allocation error\n");
        exit(1);
    }
}

void realocate(int *p,int n)
{
    p=(int*)realloc(p,n*n*sizeof(int));
    if(p==NULL)
    {
        printf("Reallocation error\n");
        exit(1);
    }
}

void show(int *p,int n)
{
    int *q,i,j;
    q=p;
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        for(j=0;j<n;j++)
        {
            printf("%d\t",*q);
            q=q+1;
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

void cleaner(int *p)
{
    free(p);
}
int main() {
    int *p,n;
    p=NULL;
    printf("n=");
    scanf("%d",&n);
    alocate(p,n);
    read(p,n);
    show(p,n);
    realocate(p,2);
    read(p,2);
    show(p,2);
    cleaner(p);
    return 0;
    system("pause");
}

NetBeans (MinGW):

RUN FAILED (exit value 5)

Signal received: SIGSEGV (?) with sigcode ? (?) From process: ? For program cppapplication_1, pid -1

Visual Studio:

Unhandled exception at 0x5c81e42e (msvcr100d.dll) in Capp.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation writing location 0x00000000.


And if I delete p=NULL; from main function, it says:

Run-Time Check Failure #3 - The variable 'p' is being used without being initialized. Unhandled exception at 0x5b4ee42e (msvcr100d.dll) in Capp.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation writing location 0xcccccccc.

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4  
My advice is that you build with debug info, and learn to use a debugger. –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 9 '11 at 13:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your alocate function correctly allocates memory, but does not return a pointer to the allocated memory. You can fix it like this

int *alocate(int n)
{
    int *p=(int*)malloc(n*n*sizeof(int));
    if(p==NULL)
    {
        printf("Allocation error\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    return p;
}

In your main function, you would use alocate like this:

p = alocate(n);

You need to make a similar change to your realocate function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you !!!!! –  user1089723 Dec 9 '11 at 13:32

You are passing the "p" pointer argument by value to the allocate function. This means when you call the allocate function the first time in your main function. You pass the NULL value to allocate. Then you set the p parameter inside the allocate function, so p is given another value but when you return from the allocate function the value of p is still null in the main function.

If you want to update p in the main function, either pass a pointer to p to the allocate function or return the p value in this function like following:

int * alocate(int n)
{
    int *p;
    p=(int*)malloc(n*n*sizeof(int));
    if(p==NULL)
    {
        printf("Allocation error\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    return p;
}

int main() {
    int *p,n;
    p=NULL;
    printf("n=");
    scanf("%d",&n);
    p = alocate(n);
    read(p,n);
    show(p,n);
    realocate(p,2);
    read(p,2);
    show(p,2);
    cleaner(p);
    return 0;
    system("pause");
}

The reallocate function should be modified the same way.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you !!!!! –  user1089723 Dec 9 '11 at 13:31

The error that first stood out to me, is that the allocate function only does its allocation locally. Change to:

void alocate(int **p,int n)
{
    *p=(int*)malloc(n*n*sizeof(int));
    if(*p==NULL)
    {
        printf("Allocation error\n");
        exit(1);
    }
}

Call it like this:

alocate(&p,n);

Do the same with the reallocate function.

The reason is that you pass the pointer as a value, not "by reference". This means that in allocate it is just a normal local variable. All changes to it will be lost when the function returns. If you pass the address of the pointer (&p) it will work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you !!!!! –  user1089723 Dec 9 '11 at 13:32

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