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EDIT:

Thanks everybody that spend a time for my question. I completely agree that my question wasn't clearly.

In short: My question was how can I make a limited pointer container, that can hold only class from limited group of classes. I called it enum, and this was a big mistake. As I wrote, the polymorphism isn't the main issue, it was only an illustration.

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4  
What exactly are you trying to do here? –  Xeo Dec 9 '11 at 13:39
    
looks like polymorphism –  Flexo Dec 9 '11 at 13:44
    
Couldn't able to understand what you are trying to do... –  Paul Varghese Dec 9 '11 at 13:44
    
Out of interest people does class DOG::animal mean the same thing as class DOG : public animal? Also why are dog::jump and cat::jump declared with fully qualified names, is that necessary? –  Sideshow Bob Dec 9 '11 at 14:14
2  
Voted to reopen, the edit clarified the question and it is now answerable. :) Hint since I can't post an answer until it's open again: Boost.Variant, which is kind of a union. –  Xeo Dec 10 '11 at 19:17

3 Answers 3

Like I already said in my comment, you can do this with Boost.Variant. There's also the other way, and the more natural, and that is the usual class hierarchy with polymorphism.

Since there are already answers on the hierarchy version, I'm going to focus on the variant version here.

First the code, an explanation afterwards:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/variant.hpp>

struct Cat{
  void speak() const{ std::cout << "meow\n"; }
  void cat_extra() const{ std::cout << "Special cat move!\n"; }
  ~Cat(){ std::cout << "Cat died\n"; }
};

struct Dog{
  void speak() const{ std::cout << "wuff\n"; }
  void dog_extra() const{ std::cout << "Special dog move!\n"; }
  ~Dog(){ std::cout << "Dog died\n"; }
};

struct Bird{
  void speak() const{ std::cout << "chirp\n"; }
  void bird_extra() const{ std::cout << "Special bird move!\n"; }
  ~Bird(){ std::cout << "Bird died\n"; }
};

struct Fish{
  void speak() const{ std::cout << "blub\n"; }
  void fish_extra() const{ std::cout << "Special fish move!\n"; }
  ~Fish(){ std::cout << "Fish died\n"; }
};

struct speak_visitor
    : boost::static_visitor<void>
{
    template<class Animal>
    void operator()(Animal const* p) const{
        p->speak();
    }
};

struct extra_visitor
    : boost::static_visitor<void>
{
    void operator()(Cat const* p) const{
        p->cat_extra();
    }
    void operator()(Dog const* p) const{
        p->dog_extra();
    }
    void operator()(Bird const* p) const{
        p->bird_extra();
    }
    void operator()(Fish const* p) const{
        p->fish_extra();
    }
};

struct delete_visitor
    : boost::static_visitor<void>
{
    template<class Animal>
    void operator()(Animal const* p) const{
        delete p;
    }
};

int main(){
    typedef boost::variant<Cat*, Dog*, Bird*, Fish*> variant_type;
    variant_type var;
    speak_visitor sv;
    delete_visitor dv;
    extra_visitor ev;

    var = new Cat();
    var.apply_visitor(sv);
    var.apply_visitor(ev);
    var.apply_visitor(dv);

    var = new Dog();
    var.apply_visitor(sv);
    var.apply_visitor(ev);
    var.apply_visitor(dv);

    var = new Bird();
    var.apply_visitor(sv);
    var.apply_visitor(ev);
    var.apply_visitor(dv);

    var = new Fish();
    var.apply_visitor(sv);
    var.apply_visitor(ev);
    var.apply_visitor(dv);
}

Running example on Ideone.

Now on to the explanation. A boost::variant is basically an enhanced and tagged union. A union can store different stuff, but only one at a time. Same goes for a variant. A boost::variant is tagged, because you can find out which type is currently stored with the which member function, which will return a 0-based index depending on which type is currently stored. The linked documentation will explain a variant better than I possibly can.

For safe "visitation" of the stored value, a construct named "visitor" is required. The visitor concept is a great one, and there are many resources out there which describe it. The linked documentation goes into some details too here. Basically, the variant internally does a switch on the stored type (with which) and calls the variant's operator() with the appropriate argument, something like this:

// something similar to this happens internally in `apply_visitor`
// contrived for our example classes here
template<class V>
void variant::apply_visitor(V& v){
  switch(this->which()){
    case 0: v((Cat*)&(this->internal_storage)); break;
    case 1: v((Dog*)&(this->internal_storage)); break;
    case 2: v((Bird*)&(this->internal_storage)); break;
    case 3: v((Fish*)&(this->internal_storage)); break;
  }
}

Thanks to this, the appropriate operator() with the appropriate argument is called. This also allows the compiler to catch a possible error when one of the variant types isn't handled by the supplied visitor, because no fitting overload for operator() is available.

This concept may not be entirely clear when using the generic visitors (speak_visitor, delete_visitor), but is made clear by the extra_visitor. If you comment out one of the operator() overloads in there, the compiler will barf at you.

If you have any questions, please let me know in the comments. And last but not least, I can only repeat that you should read the documentation. :)

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EDIT this answers the poster's original question, not the current one. enjoy.

It looks like what you're trying to do might be this.

class Animal
{
    virtual void jump() = 0;
};

class Dog : public Animal
{
    virtual void jump() { do stuff here; }
    void bark() { other stuff; } // method peculiar to dogs
};

class Cat : public Animal
{
    virtual void jump() { do stuff here; }
};

void main()
{
    Animal *a = new Dog(); // abstract types have to be referred to by pointers
    a->jump();
    delete a;

    Dog d;
    d.bark(); // if the compiler knows it's a dog, it can do dog things
    Animal *b = &d;
    b->jump(); // although b came from d, it's an animal so can only jump not bark
}

Now do you really need to know whether an Animal is a Dog or a Cat at runtime? This would break encapsulation - presumably you are subclassing Animal because you want to hide the Animal type, not reveal it.

If so you can use dynamic_cast and/or run-time type identification http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typeid which will tell you whether each class is a cat or dog.

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Please see my edit –  yoni Dec 10 '11 at 17:27
1  
No need for animal_type, that's what dynamic_cast is for. –  Puppy Dec 10 '11 at 19:31
    
Fair point, edited. –  Sideshow Bob Dec 12 '11 at 11:30

Why do you want an enum? Why not do this?

class animal {public: virtual void jump() = 0;}; 
class DOG:public animal{public: virtual void dog::jump(){}}; 
class CAT:public animal{public: virtual void cat::jump(){}}; 
DOG dog; CAT cat;
animal &a1 = dog; // Using a reference
a1.jump();
animal *a2 = &dog; // Using a pointer
a2->jump();
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Sorry, I fixed the :: type of the question but oversaw the public/private issue. I now added "public" where necessary. –  Werner Henze Dec 9 '11 at 14:12
    
That fixed it. Using struct instead of class would have been sufficient though :) –  Flexo Dec 9 '11 at 14:14

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