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I want to write a Oracle based query where I can choose if i want to see the results so let's say:

SELECT *
FROM table
//when there are more than 10 rows

how can I do this?

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1  
What RDBMS and please explain better. –  Martin Smith Dec 9 '11 at 13:50
3  
Why the downvotes? –  Mark Bannister Dec 9 '11 at 13:50
    
Choose... Choose the form of the destructor! –  Stealth Rabbi Dec 9 '11 at 13:51
1  
10 rows in total, or 10 rows of a given condition? –  Albin Sunnanbo Dec 9 '11 at 13:51
1  
@AllisonC - Can't have aggregates in a WHERE clause. –  Martin Smith Dec 9 '11 at 13:53

6 Answers 6

select * from table
where 10 < (select count(*) from table)
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That is what I also said, but is this ok? I know it works but is this sql code fine? –  user999379 Dec 9 '11 at 13:56
    
@Martin oracle sql.. How do I have to do this then? –  user999379 Dec 9 '11 at 13:56
    
@user999379 - Not sure what I was thinking there about avoiding 2 scans. If there is a way of doing it it escapes me at the moment. You could also use COUNT(*) OVER() but probably no advantage over this approach. –  Martin Smith Dec 9 '11 at 14:10

Best speed:

select * from table
where 10=(select count(*) from
          table
          where rownum <11)

:)


UPDATE: Because there are suspicions that I claim something that is not true, here some tests: In SQL Developer(keep in mind that select * from table will offer only first 50 rows, but count(*) read all requested rows) The table has no indexes.

select
count(*) from
table

22074412 rows

3.16 seconds


select * from table where 10 = 
(select
count(*) from
table
where rownum <11
)

0.051 seconds


select * from table where 10 < 
(select
count(*) from
table
) 

3.39 seconds


select count(*) from table where 10 < 
(select
count(*) from
table
)

7.69 seconds


select count(*) from table where 10 = 
(select
count(*) from
table
where rownum <11
)

3.42 seconds

Cause: Subquery with rownum is faster (it reads not the entire table)

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Would this be even faster than LIMIT? If yes, How? –  dragosrsupercool Dec 9 '11 at 14:12
    
there is no LIMIT in oracle :) Rownum is somehow equivalent :) –  Florin Ghita Dec 9 '11 at 14:13
    
It will not produce better speed then the rest of the count(*) queries –  Daniel Haviv Dec 9 '11 at 16:17
3  
I think the otherwise. Let be a table with 10M rows. The subquery is evaluated first. My subquery run at speed light. It reads only 10 rows. The others will read the entire table -> slow. After that things run in the same mode. My subquery is faster. –  Florin Ghita Dec 9 '11 at 16:33
2  
Took me a little while to work out why this would be faster. @DanielHaviv This will be quicker. With a condition on ROWNUM, it then uses the STOPKEY execution plan step so doesn't need to do a full table/index scan. –  Mike Meyers Dec 9 '11 at 16:35
DECLARE @Var int;
SET @Var = SELECT COUNT(*) FROM [somewhere]

IF @Var > 10
BEGIN
    SELECT * FROM [somewhere]
END

You mean something like that? Or just how to use the where clause?

SELECT * 
FROM [somewhere]
WHERE (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM [somewhere]) > 10
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This has the same "issue" as what Martin said, You're scanning the table twice... –  user999379 Dec 9 '11 at 13:58
    
Hm good point but you forgot to mention that in your post. –  Mythje Dec 9 '11 at 14:02
1  
@user999379 There aren't necessarily two table scans though. The count(*) can probably be done with an index scan which may be considerably faster than a table scan. –  Mike Meyers Dec 9 '11 at 16:32

This should do it for you:

SELECT * FROM [table] WHERE (SELECT COUNT(1) FROM [table]) > 10
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select * from YourTable where (select count(*) from YourTable ) > 10
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if you would like to avoid double scans and you have valid statistics you can

select * from table a, all_tables b
where    b.num_rows > 10
and      b.table_name = 'table';
share|improve this answer
    
I'd probably use user_tables rather than all_tables. Or use all_tables along with a condition on the OWNER column. –  Mike Meyers Dec 9 '11 at 16:40
    
However, there is no way I would put this into production code since it relies very heavily on up-to-date statistics. Not so bad on a large table with 10M rows but a bit dodgy on a table with only a few rows. –  Mike Meyers Dec 9 '11 at 16:41

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