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From time to time I see an enum like the following:

[Flags]
public enum Options 
{
    None    = 0,
    Option1 = 1,
    Option2 = 2,
    Option3 = 4,
    Option4 = 8
}

I don't understand what exactly the [Flags]-attribute does.

Anyone have a good explanation or example they could post?

share|improve this question
    
It's also worth noting, in addition to the accepted answer, that VB.NET actually requires [Flags] - at least according to the .NET guys: social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/en-US/csharplanguage/thread/… –  Rushyo Jul 30 '12 at 15:38
13  
I wonder why highly intelligent power users/moderators didn't close this important question as not constructed. Thanks god! –  ABCD Jan 25 '13 at 1:15
1  
In the edited answer, I see myProperties.AllowedColors = .... Where did you get AllowedColors from? –  M E Moriarty Mar 6 '13 at 22:38

11 Answers 11

up vote 703 down vote accepted

The flags attribute should be used whenever the enumerable represents a collection of flags, rather than a single value. Such collections are usually manipulated using bitwise operators, for example:

myProperties.AllowedColors = MyColor.Red | MyColor.Green | MyColor.Blue;

Note that [Flags] by itself doesn't change this at all - all it does is enable a nice representation by the .ToString() method:

[Flags] enum SuitsFlags { Spades = 1, Clubs = 2, Diamonds = 4, Hearts = 8 }
enum Suits { Spades = 1, Clubs = 2, Diamonds = 4, Hearts = 8 }

...

var str1 = (Suits.Spades | Suits.Diamonds).ToString();
           // "5"
var str2 = (SuitsFlags.Spades | SuitsFlags.Diamonds).ToString();
           // "Spades, Diamonds"

It is also important to note that [Flags] does not automatically make the enum values powers of two. If you omit the numeric values, the enum will not work as one might expect in bitwise operations, because by default the values start with 0 and increment.

Incorrect declaration:

[Flags]
public enum MyColors
{
    Yellow,
    Green,
    Red,
    Blue
}

The values, if declared this way, will be Yellow = 0, Green = 1, Red = 2, Blue = 3. This will render it useless for use as flags.

Here's an example of a correct declaration:

[Flags]
public enum MyColors
{
    Yellow = 1,
    Green = 2,
    Red = 4,
    Blue = 8
}

To retrieve the distinct values in you property one can do this

if((myProperties.AllowedColors & MyColor.Yellow) == MyColor.Yellow)
{
    // Yellow has been set...
}

if((myProperties.AllowedColors & MyColor.Green) == MyColor.Green)
{
    // Green has been set...
}    

or, in .NET 4 and later,

if (myProperties.AllowedColors.HasFlag(MyColor.Yellow))
{
    // Yellow has been set...
}

Under the covers

This works because you previously used multiples of two in you enumeration. Under the covers your enumeration values looks like this (presented as bytes, which has 8 bits which can be 1's or 0's)

 Yellow: 00000001
 Green:  00000010
 Red:    00000100
 Blue:   00001000

Likewise, after you've set your property AllowedColors to Red, Green and Blue (which values where OR'ed by the pipe |), AllowedColors looks like this

myProperties.AllowedColors: 00001110

So when you retreive the value you are actually bitwise AND'ing the values

myProperties.AllowedColors: 00001110
             MyColor.Green: 00000010
             -----------------------
                            00000010 // Hey, this is the same as MyColor.Green!

The None = 0 value

And regarding use 0 in you enumeration, quoting from msdn:

[Flags]
public enum MyColors
{
    None = 0,
    ....
}

Use None as the name of the flag enumerated constant whose value is zero. You cannot use the None enumerated constant in a bitwise AND operation to test for a flag because the result is always zero. However, you can perform a logical, not a bitwise, comparison between the numeric value and the None enumerated constant to determine whether any bits in the numeric value are set.

You can find more info about the flags attribute and its usage at msdn and designing flags at msdn

share|improve this answer
5  
As OJ pointed out, the values need to be powers of two, not multiples. Please update your answer –  Oskar Aug 6 '09 at 9:07
58  
Flags itself does nothing. Also, C# does not require Flags per se. But the ToString implementation of your enum uses Flags, and so does Enum.IsDefined, Enum.Parse, etc. Try to remove Flags and look at the result of MyColor.Yellow | MyColor.Red; without it you get "5", with Flags you get "Yellow, Red". Some other parts of the framework also use [Flags] (e.g., XML Serialization). –  Ruben Aug 17 '09 at 17:30
2  
// Yellow has been set..., I find a bit misleading. Nothing has been set, it means that Yellow is a member of your AllowedColors, perhaps better would be //Yellow is allowed ? –  sweaver2112 May 2 '12 at 19:32
4  
I prefer to use constants of the form A = 1 << 0, B = 1 << 1, C = 1 << 2 ... Much easier to read, understand, visually check and change. –  Nick Westgate Apr 9 '13 at 12:06
1  
@borrrden, hell yeahh! I found this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.enum.aspx - see "Remarks" part: "Enum is the base class for all enumerations in the .NET Framework." and "The enumeration does not explicitly inherit from Enum; the inheritance relationship is handled implicitly by the compiler." So, when you write: public enum bla bla bla - this is a value type. But, the HasFlag method wants you to give him an instance of System.Enum which is a class (reference type:) –  Aleksei Chepovoi Jun 28 '13 at 14:59

You can also do this

[Flags]
public enum MyEnum
{
    None   = 0,
    First  = 1 << 0,
    Second = 1 << 1,
    Third  = 1 << 2,
    Fourth = 1 << 3
}

I find the bit-shifting easier than typing 4,8,16,32 and so on. It has no impact on your code because it's all done at compile time

share|improve this answer
41  
And if you like consistency, you can use First = 1 << 0. –  romkyns Jan 10 '11 at 11:30
8  
That's what I mean, I prefer to have the full int in source code. If I have a column on a table in the database called MyEnum that stores a value of one of the enums, and a record has 131,072, I would need to get out my calculator to figure out that that corresponds to the enum with the value 1<<17. As opposed to just seeing the value 131,072 written in the source. –  JeremyWeir May 29 '12 at 17:11
3  
"it's all done at compile time" this type of comment may be interesting to some, but I find it frustrating because it implies that say, 20 bit-shifts at run-time will have any measurable impact on performance. CPUs are very good at bit-shifts, enums are not going to have an arbitrary number of members, and this won't work for more than 32 or 64 elements anyway. Not remotely important as a performance issue. –  jwg Feb 14 '13 at 9:48
3  
@jwg I agree, it's silly to be overly worried about the runtime performance of this, but all the same, I do think its nice to know that this isn't going to be inserting bitshifts anywhere you use the enum. More of a 'that's neat' thing rather than anything related to performance –  Orion Edwards Feb 15 '13 at 19:25
6  
@JeremyWeir - Several bits are going to be set in a flag enumeration value. So your method of data analysis is what is improper. Run a procedure to Represent your integer value in binary. 131,072 [D] = 0000 0000 0000 0001 0000 0000 0000 0000 [B] [32].. With the 17th bit set, an enum value assigned 1<<17 is easily determinable. 0110 0011 0011 0101 0101 0011 0101 1011 [b] [32] .. the enum values assign 1<<31, 1<<30, 1<<26, 1<<25.. etc. etc. is determinable without even the aid of a calculator at all.. which I doubt you would be able to determine at all without getting the binary rep. –  Brett Caswell Mar 19 '13 at 5:41

Please see the following for an example which shows the declaration and potential usage:

namespace Flags
{
    class Program
    {

        [FlagsAttribute]
        public enum MyFlags : short
        {
            Foo = 0x1,
            Bar = 0x2,
            Baz = 0x4
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyFlags fooBar = MyFlags.Foo | MyFlags.Bar;

            if ((fooBar & MyFlags.Foo) == MyFlags.Foo)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Item has Foo flag set");
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Combining answers http://stackoverflow.com/a/8462/1037948 (declaration via bit-shifting) and http://stackoverflow.com/a/9117/1037948 (using combinations in declaration) you can bit-shift previous values rather than using numbers. Not necessarily recommending it, but just pointing out you can.

Rather than:

[Flags]
public enum Options : byte
{
    None    = 0,
    One     = 1 << 0,   // 1
    Two     = 1 << 1,   // 2
    Three   = 1 << 2,   // 4
    Four    = 1 << 3,   // 8

    // combinations
    OneAndTwo = One | Two,
    OneTwoAndThree = One | Two | Three,
}

You can declare

[Flags]
public enum Options : byte
{
    None    = 0,
    One     = 1 << 0,       // 1
    // now that value 1 is available, start shifting from there
    Two     = One << 1,     // 2
    Three   = Two << 1,     // 4
    Four    = Three << 1,   // 8

    // same combinations
    OneAndTwo = One | Two,
    OneTwoAndThree = One | Two | Three,
}

Confirming with LinqPad:

foreach(var e in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Options))) {
    string.Format("{0} = {1}", e.ToString(), (byte)e).Dump();
}

Results in:

None = 0
One = 1
Two = 2
OneAndTwo = 3
Three = 4
OneTwoAndThree = 7
Four = 8
share|improve this answer
3  
The combinations are a good recommendation, but I think the chained bit-shift would be prone to copy-and-paste errors such as Two = One << 1, Three = One << 1, etc... The incrementing integers of the form 1 << n are safer and the intent is clearer. –  Rupert Rawnsley Mar 20 at 13:00
    
@RupertRawnsley to quote my answer: > Not necessarily recommending it, but just pointing out you can –  drzaus Mar 20 at 16:13
    
+1 for the combinations, great for verbosely representing bitwise fields. –  FKunecke Sep 18 at 18:10

I asked recently about something similar.

If you use flags you can add an extension method to enums to make checking the contained flags easier (see post for detail)

This allows you to do:

[Flags]
public enum PossibleOptions : byte
{
    None = 0,
    OptionOne = 1,
    OptionTwo = 2,
    OptionThree = 4,
    OptionFour = 8,

    //combinations can be in the enum too
    OptionOneAndTwo = OptionOne | OptionTwo,
    OptionOneTwoAndThree = OptionOne | OptionTwo | OptionThree,
    ...
}

Then you can do:

PossibleOptions opt = PossibleOptions.OptionOneTwoAndThree 

if( opt.IsSet( PossibleOptions.OptionOne ) ) {
    //optionOne is one of those set
}

I find this easier to read than the most ways of checking the included flags.

share|improve this answer
    
IsSet is an extension method I assume? –  Robert MacLean Jun 2 '09 at 10:09
    
Yeah - read the other question that I link to for details: stackoverflow.com/questions/7244 –  Keith Jun 2 '09 at 12:16
28  
.NET 4 adds a HasFlag method to enumerations, so you can do opt.HasFlag( PossibleOptions.OptionOne ) without having to write your own extensions –  Orion Edwards Jul 19 '10 at 20:53

It is possible to not have to worry about the ordering of flags by using a T4 Template:

[Flags]
public enum AnEnumeration
{
    None                = <#= EFReset() #>,
    ThingOne            = <#= EF() #>,
    ThingTwo            = <#= EF() #>,
    ThingThree          = <#= EF() #>,
    ThingFour           = <#= EF() #>,
    MoreThings          = <#= EF() #>,
    SomethingBusy       = <#= EF() #>,
    SomethingPending    = <#= EF() #>,
    SomethingCompleted  = <#= EF() #>
};

And here's the fun part (placed at the end of the template document):

<#+
int EFWidth = 4;
int EFCounter;
string EF()
{
    return String.Format(
        "0x{0:X" + EFWidth + "}",
        1 << EFCounter++);
}
string EFReset()
{
    EFCounter = 0;
    return String.Format(
        "0x{0:X" + EFWidth + "}", 0);
}
#>

Output:

[Flags]
public enum AnEnumeration
{
    None                = 0x0000,
    ThingOne            = 0x0001,
    ThingTwo            = 0x0002,
    ThingThree          = 0x0004,
    ThingFour           = 0x0008,
    MoreThings          = 0x0010,
    SomethingBusy       = 0x0020,
    SomethingPending    = 0x0040,
    SomethingCompleted  = 0x0080
};
share|improve this answer
5  
I'm tempted to downvote this for overkill (but I haven't). If you can't understand & write the numbers yourself, should you even be using bit flags? –  Doug Mar 29 '12 at 16:28
5  
What does this have anything to do with a lack of understanding? This is merely for convenience in case there is a reason the enum ordering might need to change at any given point. Enumerated sets should be in consecutive, ascending order. In this case, it is in exponential (left shift) ascending order rather than linear. Who says I don't understand or can't write it in manually? Who says I'd want to bother with reordering the flags if I ever felt compelled to do so? –  Apelsin Mar 30 '12 at 21:15
4  
This is the type of thing that confuses both new programmers and veteran programmers alike when someone comes along to maintain your code. "WTF, why is this enum in a T4 template? Oh... so the author didn't have to manually update his bit masks? I repeat, WTF?". This style of coding will inevitably land you on thedailywtf.com, and with good reason. –  Chris Dec 3 '13 at 18:28

@Nidonocu

To add another flag to an existing set of values, use the OR assignment operator.

Mode = Mode.Read;
//Add Mode.Write
Mode |= Mode.Write;
Assert.True(((Mode & Mode.Write) == Mode.Write)
  && ((Mode & Mode.Read) == Mode.Read)));
share|improve this answer

There's something overly verbose to me about the if ((x & y) == y)... construct, especially if x AND y are both compound sets of flags and you only want to know if there's any overlap.

In this case, all you really need to know is if there's a non-zero value[1] after you've bitmasked.

[1] See Jaime's comment. If we were authentically bitmasking, we'd only need to check that the result was positive. But since enums can be negative, even, strangely, when combined with the [Flags] attribute, it's defensive to code for != 0 rather than > 0.

Building off of @andnil's setup...

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace BitFlagPlay
{
    class Program
    {
        [Flags]
        public enum MyColor
        {
            Yellow = 0x01,
            Green = 0x02,
            Red = 0x04,
            Blue = 0x08
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var myColor = MyColor.Yellow | MyColor.Blue;
            var acceptableColors = MyColor.Yellow | MyColor.Red;

            Console.WriteLine((myColor & MyColor.Blue) != 0);     // True
            Console.WriteLine((myColor & MyColor.Red) != 0);      // False                
            Console.WriteLine((myColor & acceptableColors) != 0); // True
            // ... though only Yellow is shared.

            Console.WriteLine((myColor & MyColor.Green) != 0);    // Wait a minute... ;^D

            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Enum may be based on a signed type, so you should use "!= 0" instead of ">0". –  Jaime Pardos Aug 16 '13 at 9:18
    
@JaimePardos -- As long as we keep them honest bytes, as I do in this example, there's no concept of negative. Just 0 to 255. As MSDN warns, "Use caution if you define a negative number as a flag enumerated constant because... [that] might make your code confusing and encourage coding errors." It's strange to think in terms of "negative bitflags"! ;^) I'll edit more in a bit. But you're right, if we do use negative values in our enum, we'd need to check for != 0. –  ruffin Aug 16 '13 at 13:23

To add Mode.Write:

Mode = Mode | Mode.Write;
share|improve this answer
25  
or Mode |= Mode.Write –  abatishchev Feb 24 '09 at 11:29

Flags allow you to use bitmasking inside your enumeration. This allows you to combine enumeration values, while retaining which ones are specified.


    [Flags]
    public enum DashboardItemPresentationProperties : long
    {
    	None = 0,
    	HideCollapse = 1,
    	HideDelete = 2,
    	HideEdit = 4,
    	HideOpenInNewWindow = 8,
    	HideResetSource = 16,
    	HideMenu = 32
    }
share|improve this answer

Personally I do not like this expression.

[System.Flags]
public enum MyEnum
{
    None   = 0,
    First  = 1 << 0,
    Second = 1 << 1,
    Third  = 1 << 2,
    Fourth = 1 << 3
}

Because you can't catch the limit counting of enum values easily.
Unity's int max print as

0x7FFFFFFF

So the maximum counting of enum values is 32 like below.

[System.Flags]
private enum MyEnum{
        None = 0,
        A1 = 1 << 0,
        A2 = 1 << 1, 
        A3 = 1 << 2, 
        A4 = 1 << 3, 
        ...
        A30 = 1 << 29, 
        A31 = 1 << 30 //enum value's end
    };

I prefer this expression, because I can notice the limit count of the enum easily and have not bad readability.

[System.Flags]
private enum ActorState
    {
        Ready   = 0x00000001,
        Fly     = 0x00000002,
        Sit     = 0x00000004, 
        Stop    = 0x00000008,
        w1      = 0x00000010,
        w2      = 0x00000020,
        w3      = 0x00000040,
        w4      = 0x80000000 //compiler makes error if number is overflowed. 
    };

you can divide the area if you need.

[System.Flags]
private enum MyEnum 
    {
        Ready   = 0x00000001,
        Walk    = 0x00000002,
        Attack  = 0x00000004, 
        Hello   = 0x00000008,


        sit1    = 0x00010000,
        sit2    = 0x00020000,
        sit3    = 0x00040000,
        sit4    = 0x00080000
    };

    //check sit
    if(state&0xFFFF0000)
    {
    }

And if you are lack of slots, you can change enum type to long.

[System.Flags]
private enum ActorState : long
    {
        Ready       = 0x0000000000000001,
        See         = 0x0000000000000002,
        Sit         = 0x0000000000000004,
        Walk        = 0x0000000000000008,
        Attack      = 0x0000000000000010,
        Listen      = 0x0000000000000020,

        max         = 0x7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF //long.MaxValue
    };
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