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I have an app that's built for Android 2.2, so I'm not using the 3.0+ built-in ActionBar class but rather building my own custom ActionBar implementation using Google's older UI recommendation that was introduced a couple of years ago.

All of my screens have between 1 and 3 actions that can be performed, so they all fit very nicely into the ActionBar UI (which Google recommends has a maximum of three buttons). The problem now is that none of my screens have a regular options menu and so they do nothing when the user presses the hardware Menu button.

According to Google's interface guidelines, this is correct behavior. If your activity doesn't have an options menu then it should do nothing when the Menu button is pressed. I've found during user testing, however, that users are quite perplexed when they press Menu and nothing happens (and every single user has tried, usually multiple times). They say that they appreciate the actions being exposed on the screen through the ActionBar, but at the same time they want the Menu button to do something.

I've been looking at Google's first party apps and it looks like they just always have enough options available to be able to load up the options menu with stuff after the ActionBar is full. Google+ seems to use the Menu button in the traditional way for overflow options on phones that have one, and they show a dropdown menu in the ActionBar for phones that don't. That would work if I had more than three actions but I currently don't.

It seems that the only way to meet my user's expectations is to put some junk options that have no value into the Options Menu just so that something happens when they push the button. I really don't want to do that. Does anybody know of a good way to deal with this problem? Should I just leave the menu button alone and expect people to figure out that it doesn't do anything?

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I think it's safe to assume that most users don't know the menu button exists and having all of the actionable items displayed on screen is best. User testing by Google has revealed this and it is why they have chosen to eliminate the menu and go with the built-in action bar starting with Android 3.0 and culminating in the recent 4.0 release.

Something to think about would be added a single "About" item to the pre-3.0 options menu/post-3.0 overflow menu. This could just popup a dialog with simple info about the application (e.g., version, licensing, link to website, author, etc.). This way there is something there should they happen to press the menu button but it is not required in order to properly use each activity to its fullest potential.

I have an app that's built for Android 2.2, so I'm not using the 3.0+ built-in ActionBar class but rather building my own custom ActionBar implementation using Google's older UI recommendation that was introduced a couple of years ago.

As an author of an action bar library this sentence disturbs me. It's fairly trivial to use a custom action bar implementation on pre-3.0 and the native one post-3.0. Take a look at Google's Action Bar Compat sample.

...or, you know, you could also go with a library like ActionBarSherlock that does this for you! </shamelessPlug>

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Thanks for the reinforcement. I'll leave the menu button empty and stop worrying about it. The Menu button will probably be phased out of high-end phones a year from now anyway so this is only a short term problem. Also thanks for the Compat link, I hadn't seen that. My custom implementation was finished before Honeycomb was even announced, so I never really gave any thought to supporting the native one when possible since mine already worked fine. –  chefgon Dec 9 '11 at 19:38

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