Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a history in programming, but not much in software development. I'm currently writing a piece of software for the company I work at, and I've come to challenge myself on the readability of my code.

I want to know whether this is a "valid" alternative to embedded if statements, or if there is anything better I could use.

Let's say I have the following method:

public void someMethod()
{
    if (some condition)
    {
        if (some condition 2)
        {
            if (some condition 3)
            {
                // ...etc all the way until:
                doSomething();
            }
            else
            {
                System.err.println("Specific Condition 3 Error");
            }
        }
        else
        {
            System.err.println("Specific Condition 2 Error");
        }
    }
    else
    {
        System.err.println("Specific Condition 1 Error");
    }
}

Now the first thing I should point out is that in this instance, combining the conditions (with &&) isn't possible, since each one has a unique error that I want to report, and if I combined them I wouldn't be able to do that (or would I?). The second thing I should point out before anyone screams "SWITCH STATEMENT!" at me is that not all of these conditions can be handled by a switch statement; some are Object specific method calls, some are integer comparisons, etc.

That said, is the following a valid way of making the above code more readable, or is there a better way of doing it?

public void someMethod()
{
    if (!some condition)
    {
        System.err.println("Specific Condition 1 Error");
        return;
    }

    if (!some condition 2)
    {
        System.err.println("Specific Condition 2 Error");
        return;
    }

    if (!some condition 3)
    {
        System.err.println("Specific Condition 3 Error");
        return;
    }

    doSomething();
}

So basically, instead of checking for conditions and reporting errors in else blocks, we check for the inverse of the condition and return if it is true. The result should be the same, but is there a better way of handling this?

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I was being particularly pedantic I would use something like this.

boolean c1, c2, c3;

public void someMethod() {
  boolean ok = true;
  String err = "";

  if (ok && !(ok &= c1)) {
    err = "Specific Condition 1 Error";
  }

  if (ok && !(ok &= c2)) {
    err = "Specific Condition 2 Error";
  }

  if (ok && !(ok &= c3)) {
    err = "Specific Condition 3 Error";
  }

  if ( ok ) {
    doSomething();
  } else {
    System.out.print(err);
  }
}

You are now single-exit AND flat.

Added

If &= is difficult for you, use something like:

  if (ok && !c3) {
    err = "Specific Condition 3 Error";
    ok = false;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Those are some awesome conditions. I don't think I've ever used the &= operation before! –  Rsaesha Dec 9 '11 at 16:27
1  
I seem to remember in C you could just do if (!(ok &= cond)) { or something like that, which is tidier but my C is a bit rusty nowadays. –  OldCurmudgeon Dec 9 '11 at 16:32
2  
Single-exit and flat, but you've taken something obvious and turned it into something that people need to think twice about. –  yshavit Dec 9 '11 at 16:48
    
@yshavit ... until you realise what it is doing then it is as simple and obvious as any paradigm. It removes the arrow smell without introducing the multiple exits smell. It also aids debugging - put a breakpoint on each of the err = lines and leave them there forever. –  OldCurmudgeon Dec 9 '11 at 16:58
    
@Paul Sure, and then you come to that code a year later and again have to remember what this weird pattern is. Or, someone comes across your code and has to figure it out. If everyone were doing this, that'd be one thing; but this is not very idiomatic Java code, and while a good Java developer could figure out what you're doing, imho you're setting yourself up for a hard-to-understand code base if even something as basic as nested ifs forces someone to scratch their head for a few seconds. –  yshavit Dec 9 '11 at 18:17

I would write it as

if (failing condition) {
    System.err.println("Specific Condition 1 Error");
} else {
    somethingExpensiveCondition2and3Dependon();
    if (failing condition 2)
        System.err.println("Specific Condition 2 Error");
    else if (failing condition 3)
        System.err.println("Specific Condition 3 Error");
    else
        doSomething();
}
share|improve this answer
    
If I'm correct, this wouldn't work if I wanted to execute code between the condition checks would it? Other than that, it's a nice way of doing it. –  Rsaesha Dec 9 '11 at 15:36
    
I suspect the code you want to put between the checks could be put before them. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 9 '11 at 15:44
    
It could, but in some cases the code would take a long time to execute. For reasons of efficiency, I don't want to have to execute lots of code that conditions 2 & 3 depend on if condition 1 is going to fail anyway. –  Rsaesha Dec 9 '11 at 15:50
    
I have added an example of how to handle this. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 9 '11 at 15:51
    
Hmm, I see. Yet if condition 3 depends on something that condition 2 doesn't, we've arrived right back at the start (embedded ifs!). I like your solution, and in most cases it would be the best one, but my scenario is unfortunately one where it doesn't work as well. –  Rsaesha Dec 9 '11 at 15:58

yes, your code in both cases smells of conditional complexity (code smells)

Java is an OOP language, so your code should be factored to in the spirit of OOD, something like this:

for (Condition cond : conditions) {
    if (cond.happens(params))
         cond.getHandler().handle(params);
}

conditions list should be injected to this class, this way when a new condition is added or removed the class doesn't change. (open close principle)

share|improve this answer

Your second approach is fairly good. If you want something a little more baroque, you can move your conditions into Callable objects. Each object can also be provided with a way of handling errors. This lets you write an arbitrarily long series of tests without sacrificing functionality.

class Test {
    private final Callable<Boolean> test;
    private final Runnable errorHandler;

    public Test(Callable<Boolean> test, Runnable handler) {
        this.test = test;
        errorHandler = handler;
    }

    public boolean runTest() {
        if (test.call()) {
            return true;
        }
        errorHandler.run();
        return false;
    }
}

You could then organize your code as follows:

ArrayList<Test> tests;

public void someMethod() {
    for (Test test : tests) {
        if (!test.runTest()) {
            return;
        }
    }
    doSomething();
}

EDIT

Here's a more general version of the above. It should handle almost any case of this type.

public class Condition {
    private final Callable<Boolean> test;
    private final Runnable passHandler;
    private final Runnable failHandler;

    public Condition(Callable<Boolean> test,
            Runnable passHandler, Runnable failHandler)
    {
        this.test = test;
        this.passHandler = passHandler;
        this.failHandler = failHandler;
    }

    public boolean check() {
        if (test.call()) {
            if (passHandler != null) {
                passHandler.run();
            }
            return true;
        }
        if (errorHandler != null) {
            errorHandler.run();
        }
        return false;
    }
}

public class ConditionalAction {
    private final ArrayList<Condition> conditions;
    private final Runnable action;

    public ConditionalAction(ArrayList<Condition> conditions,
            Runnable action)
    {
        this.conditions = conditions;
        this.action = action;
    }

    public boolean attemptAction() {
    for (Condition condition : conditions) {
        if (!condition.check()) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    action.run();
    return true;
    }
}

One might be tempted to add some sort of generic data that could be passed around to share info or collect results. Rather than doing that, I'd recommend implementing such data sharing within the objects that implement the conditions and action, and leave this structure as is.

share|improve this answer
    
So if I had several different types of condition (and thus requires a different runTest() method), I would just create a class that inherits the Test class for each type? This is very informative, thanks! –  Rsaesha Dec 9 '11 at 15:55
    
@Rsaesha - That's one way to do it, although runTest() is pretty general. Another approach might be to parameterize the Test class even further--by, say, having a pass handler as well as an error handler. (I'd probably rename errorHandler to failHandler for symmetry.) That way, you could associate an action with passing each test. –  Ted Hopp Dec 9 '11 at 16:59

For this case, that's about as clean as you are going to get it, since you have both custom criteria and custom responses to each condition.

share|improve this answer

What you are in essence doing is validating some conditions before calling the doSomething() method. I would extract the validation into a separate method.

public void someMethod() {
  if (isValid()) {
    doSomething();
  }
}

private boolean isValid() {
  if (!condition1) {
    System.err.println("Specific Condition 1 Error");
    return false;
  }
  if (!condition2) {
    System.err.println("Specific Condition 2 Error");
    return false;
  }
  if (!condition3) {
    System.err.println("Specific Condition 3 Error");
    return false;
  }
  return true;
}
share|improve this answer

Nope, that's about what you get in Java. If you have too many of these, it may indicate that you should refactor a bit, and possibly even rethink your algorithm -- it may be worthwhile trying to simplify it a bit, because otherwise you're going to come back to the code in a few months and wonder why the heck a + b + c + d = e but a + b' + c + d = zebra

share|improve this answer

The second option you have is the more readable one. While multiple returns are usually not recommended putting all of them at the beginning of the code is clear (it isn't as if they are scattered all over the method). Nested ifs on the other hand, are hard to follow and understand.

share|improve this answer
    
Some of my methods would have returns scattered all over. Would you say the second option is still the more readable if that were the case? –  Rsaesha Dec 9 '11 at 15:47
    
“Multiple returns are not recommended?” – In what universe? (This question does not require an answer. It is merely meant to point at the fact that the above is in fact not a fact but only an opinion.) –  Bombe Dec 9 '11 at 15:48
    
The return rule can be enforced simply by creating an rval variable and replacing every return with rval == someCondition and rval once at the end. –  avgvstvs Dec 9 '11 at 15:50
    
@Bombe You only ever want a single point of exit in your code. Read "Clean Code" from Bob Martin if you want more detail. –  avgvstvs Dec 9 '11 at 15:51
    
@Bombe - First off, the question is about opinion. The question of how readable a code is is one of opinion. Regarding your "what universe" - I'd say in a universe where readability is important. multiple returns are harder to follow vs. a single return. It doesn't mean you don't do that but it does mean you think before you do. Avoiding nested statements (ifs, fors etc. ) is also such a recommendation (and there are other of course). for this question weighing the two options effect on readability, I prefer the multiple reads at the start of a mthod –  Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz Dec 9 '11 at 16:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.