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//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Note: Automatically generate getter and setter
template<typename T>
class Wrap {
public:
  ...
  const T& operator()() const 
  { 
    return m_element; 
  }

  void operator()(const T& element)
  {
    m_element = element;
  }
  ...

private:
  T m_element;
};

// Pro:  The container may have more than 20 different member variables.
//       Each goes with a simple getter and setter for now. Due to the Wrap
//       class, we don't have to add getter and setter for any new variable
// Con:  Since this is a public API interface, if the user directly adopt the
//       Wrap class, it is difficult for any future improvement. Based on this design,
//       we cannot make Wrap private embeded class of Container since the user needs to 
//       access those public member variables of Container
class Container
{
public:
  Wrap<int>         Age;
  Wrap<double>      Balance;
  ...
};

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Con: For each different member variable, we have to add getter and setter methods
//       which will be a problem considering if you have 20 member variables.
// Pro:
//       By using PIMPL pattern, we can make the interface more robust for future improvement
//       without breaking our client's code.
class PimplClass
{
public:
    int Age() const;
    PimplClass& Age(int _age);

    double Balance() const;
    PimplClass& Balance(double _balance);

private:
    Pimpl* m_data; // hide internal data structure from the public API interface
};
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Question> Is there a better design that I can combine both auto getter+setter generation and PIMPL design pattern into this public API interface?

Thank you

// ****** Updated ************

After reading all those articles, I am convinced that getter and setter are evil. Now the question comes to how to avoid them all together.

For example,

class Bond
{
    ...

private:
    long m_lPrice;
    std::string m_strBondName;
    int  m_iVolume;
}

Give the above class Bond which includes three member variables, without using getter and setter, how does client get the price, name, or volume of an bond object?

This is the another example of getter/setter in Qt4.

Here's the improved QProgressBar API:

class QProgressBar : public QWidget
{
    ...
public:
    void setMinimum(int minimum);
    int minimum() const;
    void setMaximum(int maximum);
    int maximum() const;
    void setRange(int minimum, int maximum);
    int value() const;

    virtual QString text() const;
    void setTextVisible(bool visible);
    bool isTextVisible() const;
    Qt::Alignment alignment() const;
    void setAlignment(Qt::Alignment alignment);

public slots:
    void reset();
    void setValue(int value);

signals:
    void valueChanged(int value);
    ...
};

Thank you

share|improve this question
2  
You know that Wrap thingy is completely useless? –  Cat Plus Plus Dec 9 '11 at 15:50
1  
This is incredibly pointless, you know. –  Puppy Dec 9 '11 at 15:50
3  
Setters and getters are evil. Time to post that link [PDF] again. –  sbi Dec 9 '11 at 15:51
1  
@sbi - I disagree. Stupid setters and getters are evil. Setters and getters that enforce some sort of runtime access policy are in fact good, as are setters and getters that perform some sort of transformation (such as obtaining a pointer to a base of the contained object). –  Michael Price Dec 9 '11 at 16:06
2  
@MichaelPrice: In almost two decades I have come across very few getters and setters that were not stupid. –  sbi Dec 9 '11 at 16:08

1 Answer 1

Getters and setters are there so that you can "grab" into an object's guts and fiddle with its innards. That should make your alarm bells ring very loudly. For a well-designed class, you do not have to dig through its guts, since it lets you do everything you need to do through its interface without leaking any of its implementation details through the abstraction.

Design a class from the point of view of a user of the class ("if I have a qrxl object, I would need to make it wrgl() like this, and I also need to pass it a lrxl object occasionally, which it then uses to do frgl()"), rather than from the point of view of the implementer who needs to somehow organize his data and algorithms into useful (for him!) chunks. ("Let's just put this Johnny over here into that class, because that's where it is close to where I need it for implementing the xrxl() algorithm.")

I think in this regard Java has done a huge disservice to humanity in that it requires you to put everything into some class, even if this is against how you actually visualize your design in your head, and even if you are not (yet) thinking object-oriented. This seems to have made a design style en vogue where programmers just stuff everything into some class somewhere because "that's the way it's done."
In lots of Java code I've seen the underlying programming style is actually Structured Programming (basically "collect your data in useful chunks, and pass those to your algorithms", as done in C or Pascal), rather than Object-oriented Programming. Just because you replace struct/record by class and make the data members in this chunk only accessible through getters and setters, this doesn't mean you are doing object-oriented programming.1 This is what the author of that wonderful short paper calls pseudo classes

From what little I know about Qt, its design is also a pretty good example for a pretty bad example, with everything allocated on the heap, handed around in naked pointers, and employing the quasi-class school of design.


Give the above class Bond which includes three member variables, without using getter and setter, how does client get the price, name, or volume of an bond object?

This is the wrong question. The right question is why would a user need to get at those values? If you need to get at them manually, then Bond isn't high enough an abstraction for OO design, it's a mere C-style struct where you throw together all the data you need in one place. Ask yourself:

What would a user of a Bond want to do with such an object? How can I make the class support those operations without users having to grab into it and fiddle with its guts? How can I make the classes that interact with Bond do this? Can I pass them Bond objects, rather than price, name, or volume of an bond object?

Yes, sometimes you have to have just a bond's price in order to display it, and if that's the case, then Bond will need to support a getter function for the price, and that's Ok then. But you could still pass a Bond object to your BondPriceTable's displayBonds() function, and let that decide whether it wants to just grab the name and the price and throw that at the screen or display more values. There is no need to extract name and price manually and pass those to a display() function.


1 That's especially appalling because Java aficionados so often look down at C++ for not being "purely OO".

share|improve this answer
1  
Qt does not force the programmer to allocate on the heap and it provides various smart pointer classes. Also, any QObject can be put into an allocation graph, providing a semi-automatic memory management scheme. –  Tamás Szelei Dec 10 '11 at 11:33
    
@TamásSzelei: As I said, I know very little about Qt, but I think its API is all naked pointers. ICBWT. –  sbi Dec 10 '11 at 21:51
    
Then it's perhaps not a good idea to bring it up as an example. All Qt API functions that return or take pointers employ the QObject graph. –  Tamás Szelei Dec 10 '11 at 22:35

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