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I have the following function to open an overlay menu:

   $('.context-switch').click(function() {
       $(".context-switch-menu").toggle();
   });

To hide the menu, I would like the user to be able to click on any area outside ".context-switch-menu"

I am trying with :not() but with no success..

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6 Answers 6

$('body').click(function(e) {
     if ($(e.target).hasClass('context-switch')) {
         return;
     }

     $(".context-switch-menu").hide();
});

$('.context-switch').click(function() {
    $(".context-switch-menu").toggle();
    return false;
});
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Yep, event bubbling let's you catch the event at the top, assuming none of the other elements on the page kill bubbling. –  Mike Edwards Dec 9 '11 at 16:03

The reason this can be difficult is because of event bubbling.

You can try something like this:

$('.context-switch').click(function(e) {
   e.stopPropagation();
   $(".context-switch-menu").toggle();
});

$(".context-switch-menu").click(function(e){
   e.stopPropagation();
});


$("body").click(function(e){
     $(".context-switch-menu").hide();
});

The e.stopPropagation() prevents the click event from bubbling to the body handlers. Without it, any click to .context-switch or .context-switch-menu would also trigger the body event handler, which you don't want, as it would nullify the effect of the .context-switch click half the time. (ie, if the state is hidden, and then you click to show, the event would bubble and trigger the body handler that would then hide the .context-switch-menu again.)

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This will close the contextmenu before the event of the element inside the contextmenu happened. –  Niels Dec 9 '11 at 15:56
    
I think you would want the stopPropagation on .context-switch-menu actually. Or in addition? –  James Montagne Dec 9 '11 at 15:57
    
Oops, good call. Fixed. –  Yahel Dec 9 '11 at 16:00

Without testing, would something like this work?:


$('.context-switch').click(function() {
       $(".context-switch-menu").show();
   });
$(document).click(function() {
       $(".context-switch-menu").hide();
   });

Instead of using document, 'html' or 'body' may work as well.

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$(document).on('click', function(e) {
    if (e.target.className !='context-switch-menu') {
        $(".context-switch-menu").hide();
    }
});
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Just an idea here, based on what what others have suggested in the past:

$(document).click(function(e){
    //this should give you the clicked element's id attribute
    var elem = $(e.target).attr('classname'); 
    if(elem !== 'context-switch-menu'){
        $('.context-switch-menu').slideUp('slow'); 
        //or however you want to hide it
    }
});
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try this, we don't want to call a function when you clicked on the element itself, and not when we click inside the element. That's why we need 2 checks.

You want to use e.target which is the element you clicked.

$("html").click(function(e){
    if( !$(e.target).is(".context-switch-menu") && 
        $(e.target).closest(".context-switch-menu").length == 0
    )
    {
       alert("CLICKED OUTSIDE");
    }
});

Live fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Xc25K/1/

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