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I wish to have a Java datatype which stores key value pairs and allows the value to be retrieved by either the key or an index.

I've rolled my own data type which extends java.util.Dictionary and provides an at function to achieve the ability to retrieve by index.

class DataHash <K,V> extends Dictionary<K,V> {
  private List<K> keyOrder = new ArrayList<K>();
  private Dictionary<K,V> internalDataStore = new Hashtable<K,V>();

  @Override
  public V put(K key, V value){
    //guards go here to prevent null, duplicate keys etc.

    this.keyOrder.add(key);
    return this.internalDataStore.put(key, value);
  }

  @Override
  public V get(K key){
    return this.internalDataStore.get(key);
  }

  public V at(int index){
    K key = this.keyOrder.get(index);
    return this.internalDataStore.get(key);
  }

  //and other functions to extend dictionary etc.
  //all keeping the keyOrder in sync with the internalDataStore
}

My question for SO is whether there is an existing data type which does this, or a more efficient way to implement this in my custom datatype?

share|improve this question

I wouldn't use Dictionary or Hashtable unless you have to.

Often the Map interface and HashMap or LinkedHashMap class are better choices as they are not sunchronized. LinkedHashMap also preserves order but isn't accessible by index.

share|improve this answer

@Peter is certainly right (damn him for his fast fingers) that you should consider using a non-synchronized class to implement this and that HashMap is better to use. I thought I'd add a bit more comments about your code.

If you are extending a Map then you do not need to have an internalDataStore. You can do something like:

class DataHash <K,V> extends HashMapK,V> {
    private List<K> keyOrder = new ArrayList<K>();

    @Override
    public V put(K key, V value){
        keyOrder.add(key);
        return super.put(key, value);
    }

    // you don't need to implement the super class methods unless you need
    // to keep keyOrder in sync

    public V at(int index){
        K key = this.keyOrder.get(index);
        return get(key);
    }
}

There are no Collection classes that I know of that allow you to access by index and by hash value. Your implementation should work fine as long as you are careful to keep your List in sync with the map.

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