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I have an issue with a TreeMap that we have defined a custom key object for. The issue is that after putting a few objects into the map, and trying to retrieve with the same key used to put on the map, I get a null. I believe this is caused by the fact that we have 2 data points on the key. One value is always populated and one value is not always populated. So it seems like the issue lies with the use of compareTo and equals. Unfortunately the business requirement for how our keys determine equality needs to be implemented this way.

I think this is best illustrated with code.

public class Key implements Comparable<Key> {

    private String sometimesPopulated;
    private String alwaysPopulated;

    public int compareTo(Key aKey){

        if(this.equals(aKey)){
            return 0;
        }

        if(StringUtils.isNotBlank(sometimesPopulated) && StringUtils.isNotBlank(aKey.getSometimesPopulated())){
            return sometimesPopulated.compareTo(aKey.getSometimesPopulated());
        }
        if(StringUtils.isNotBlank(alwaysPopulated) && StringUtils.isNotBlank(aKey.getAlwaysPopulated())){
            return alwaysPopulated.compareTo(aKey.getAlwaysPopulated());
        }
        return 1;
    }

    public boolean equals(Object aObject){

        if (this == aObject) {
            return true;
        }

        final Key aKey = (Key) aObject;

        if(StringUtils.isNotBlank(sometimesPopulated) && StringUtils.isNotBlank(aKey.getSometimesPopulated())){
            return sometimesPopulated.equals(aKey.getSometimesPopulated());
        }
        if(StringUtils.isNotBlank(alwaysPopulated) && StringUtils.isNotBlank(aKey.getAlwaysPopulated())){
            return alwaysPopulated.equals(aKey.getAlwaysPopulated());
        }

        return false;
    }

So the issue occurs when trying to get a value off the map after putting some items on it.

 Map<Key, String> map = new TreeMap<Key, String>();
    Key aKey = new Key(null, "Hello");
    map.put(aKey, "world");
    //Put some more things on the map...
    //they may have a value for sometimesPopulated or not
    String value = map.get(aKey); // this = null

So why is the value null after just putting it in? I think the algorithm used by the TreeMap is sorting the map in an inconsistent manner because of the way I'm using compareTo and equals. I am open to suggestions on how to improve this code. Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
Have you tested method Key.equals() thoroughly? –  Genzer Dec 9 '11 at 16:20
1  
If you have more than one key where the two fields are blank, you will get a mixed up tree. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 9 '11 at 16:21
    
is:if(StringUtils.isNotBlank(alwaysPopulated) && StringUtils.isNotBlank(aKey.getAlwaysPopulated())) ever false? –  stew Dec 9 '11 at 16:21
    
You are better off validation the field as they are set, rather than revalidating on every comparison. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 9 '11 at 16:22
    
alwaysPopulated will never be empty, so no it doesn't get past that if condition. –  JavaKungFu Dec 9 '11 at 16:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the problem is that you are returning 1 from your compareTo if either of the sometimesPopulated values is blank or either of the alwaysPopulated values is blank. Remember that compareTo can be thought of returning the value of a subtraction operation and your's is not transitive. (a - b) can == (b - a) even when a != b.

I would return -1 if the aKey sometimesPopulated is not blank and the local sometimesPopulated is blank. If they are the same then I would do the same with alwaysPopulated.

I think your logic should be something like:

public int compareTo(Key aKey){
    if(this.equals(aKey)){
        return 0;
    }

    if (StringUtils.isBlank(sometimesPopulated)) {
        if (StringUtils.isNotBlank(aKey.getSometimesPopulated())) {
            return -1;
        }
    } else if (StringUtils.isBlank(aKey.getSometimesPopulated())) {
        return 1;
    } else {
        int result = sometimesPopulated.compareTo(aKey.getSometimesPopulated());
        if (result != 0) {
           return result;
        }
    }
    // same logic with alwaysPopulated
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is interesting, I'll take a look at this code. I do have one question though, why are you doing if(result != 0) return result? I'm trying to figure out if the putting if(this.equals(aKey)) return 0 at the beginning is right... –  JavaKungFu Dec 9 '11 at 20:18
    
I do the result != 0 because if it is == 0 then we want to drop down and do the same logic with alwaysPopulated. If it is != 0 then we can immediately return the comparison result. –  Gray Dec 9 '11 at 21:00

Your comparator violates the transitivity requirement.

Consider three objects:

  1. Object A: sometimesPopulated="X" and alwaysPopulated="3".
  2. Object B: sometimesPopulated="Y" and alwaysPopulated="1".
  3. Object C: sometimesPopulated is blank and alwaysPopulated="2".

Using your comparator, A<B and B<C. Transitivity requires that A<C. However, using your comparator, A>C.

Since the comparator doesn't fulfil its contract, TreeMap is unable to do its job correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I was thinking along these lines, but wasn't able to put it as concisely as you have. Given that is the problem, do you have suggestions on improving this without changing how equality is deteremined? –  JavaKungFu Dec 9 '11 at 16:47
    
@JavaKungFu: Can you use HashMap, since it only requires hashCode and comparison for equality? –  NPE Dec 9 '11 at 16:48
    
unfortunately no, in short we have a similar problem with finding an object if sometimesPopulated isn't there it gets hashed to the wrong "bucket" - assuming we don't use 42 as the hashcode :) –  JavaKungFu Dec 9 '11 at 17:04

I believe the problem is that you are treating two keys with both blank fields as greater than each other which could confuse the structure.

class Main {
    public static void main(String... args) {
        Map<Key, String> map = new TreeMap<Key, String>();
        Key aKey = new Key(null, "Hello");
        map.put(aKey, "world");
        //Put some more things on the map...
        //they may have a value for sometimesPopulated or not
        String value = map.get(aKey); // this = "world"
        System.out.println(value);
    }
}

class Key implements Comparable<Key> {
    private final String sometimesPopulated;
    private final String alwaysPopulated;

    Key(String alwaysPopulated, String sometimesPopulated) {
        this.alwaysPopulated = defaultIfBlank(alwaysPopulated, "");
        this.sometimesPopulated = defaultIfBlank(sometimesPopulated, "");
    }

    static String defaultIfBlank(String s, String defaultString) {
        return s == null || s.trim().isEmpty() ? defaultString : s;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Key o) {
        int cmp = sometimesPopulated.compareTo(o.sometimesPopulated);
        if (cmp == 0)
            cmp = alwaysPopulated.compareTo(o.alwaysPopulated);
        return cmp;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I think your equals, hashCode and compareTo methods should only use the field that is always populated. It's the only way to ensure the same object will always be found in the map regardless of if its optional field is set or not.

Second option, you could write an utility method that tries to find the value in the map, and if no value is found, tries again with the same key but with (or without) the optional field set.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately that is not the way the code was designed, we need our equals method to function the way it is written. –  JavaKungFu Dec 9 '11 at 20:20

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