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I just started learning C#. Sorry for the noob question.

My first training app is one where you enter your age and output it in a message box.

I want to validate input with Regex so that entering letters makes it raise an error.

The problem is I can't make it accept the Regex.

        private void textBox1_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string age;
            age = textBox1.Text;
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string regexpattern;
            regexpattern = "^\t+";
            string regex1;

            regex1 = Regex.IsMatch(regexpattern);

            if (textBox1.Text == regex1)
            {             
                MessageBox.Show("error, numbers only please!");
            }         
            else
            {
                string age;
                string afe;
                string afwe2;

                afe = "You are ";
                age = textBox1.Text;
                afwe2 = " years old!";

                MessageBox.Show(afe + age + afwe2);
            }
        }

Thanks!

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Why vote to close this as too localized? It's a perfectly valid C#/Regex question. –  Moo-Juice Dec 9 '11 at 18:01
1  
try this regex expression \d+ –  Emaad Ali Dec 9 '11 at 18:01
    
What do you mean, that you can't make it accept? If you mean that the error is show for numbers too, that's because your regex is wrong. You probably want something like @"^\d+$". –  svick Dec 9 '11 at 18:01
    
If I were you, I'd start learning C# with something other than regex. You seem like you don't quite get how types work yet, and you need to understand that first before you'll get anywhere in C#. And even though regex seems simple, there are lots of mistakes you can make with it. –  Justin Morgan Dec 9 '11 at 18:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your regex has to be

regexpattern = "^\d+$"; 

Edit And the coding is wrong. It has to be like that:

var regex = new Regex(@"^\d+$");

if (!regex.IsMatch(textBox1.Text))
{
    MessageBox.Show("error, numbers only please!");
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will not compile. You need to either escape the backslash or use a verbatim string. –  Justin Morgan Dec 9 '11 at 18:23
    
@JustinMorgan: Thanks for mentioning that. I've edited in web browser ... I've corrected the sample. –  Fischermaen Dec 9 '11 at 19:04

A great resource for any developer is the regex library. Chances are what you are looking for has already been posted there. For example, you may want to limit the age between a certain range.

regex library

share|improve this answer
    
Also, regexbuddy.com . A fantastic tool to work with regular expressions on the fly. –  Moo-Juice Dec 9 '11 at 18:16

You don't need a regex, just check if it's a number: here is a sample code, hopefully it should work.

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string age = textBox1.Text;
    int i = 0; // check if it is a int
    bool result = int.TryParse(age, out i) // see if it is a int
    if(result == true){ // check if it is a int
        string afe;
        string afwe2;
        afe = "You are ";
        afwe2 = " years old!";
        MessageBox.Show(afe + age + afwe2);
    } else {
        MessageBox.Show("Please Enter a Number!"); // error message
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 this is better than using a regex for simple age parsing. –  mattypiper Dec 9 '11 at 18:25
1  
But it could be coded less "chatty" with string.Format –  Fischermaen Dec 9 '11 at 19:18
    
true, but that didn't occur to me :(, great suggestion though. –  Link Dec 9 '11 at 19:49

with regex:

unnecessary the + with \d to validate ages of persons. a person normally live between years 0 / 113. :)

if(Regex.IsMatch(age, @"^\d{0,3}"))

others methods to do it:

using int.TryParse

int AgeAsInt; 
if(int.TryParse(age, out AgeAsInt)) 

using linq:

if(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(age) && age.All(char.IsDigit))

as I would it

if (int.TryParse(age, out ageAsInt) && ageAsInt <= 113)

you can use want it. Personally, I prefer the last.

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