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Table_A

  • TA_ID
  • TA_Column
  • TA_Column
  • [...]

Table_B

  • TB_ID
  • TB_TableA_ID
  • TA_Column
  • [...]

Table_C

  • TC_ID
  • TC_TableA_ID
  • TC_TableB_ID
  • TA_Column
  • [...]

SELECT * FROM Table_C WHERE TC_TableA_ID=1

(Yes, I Know "SELECT *" is bad; just using it for this example.)

= = = = = = = OR = = = = = = =

Table_A

  • TA_ID
  • TA_Column
  • [...]

Table_B

  • TB_ID
  • TB_TableA_ID
  • TA_Column
  • [...]

Table_C

  • TC_ID
  • TC_TableB_ID
  • TA_Column
  • [...]

SELECT * FROM Table_C c LEFT JOIN Table_B b ON c.TC_TableB_ID=b.TB_ID WHERE TB_TableA_ID=1

I've been using both throughout my projects/codes, but haven't really stuck to one; which one is the most efficient schema/query form?

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1 Answer

Mark me for your second option: the join. Table C should reference the columns to which it directly relates. For example, if:

  • Table C is EMPLOYEE
  • Table B is DEPARTMENT
  • Table A is LOCATION

What happens when location of the department changes? You update the Department table to reference the new Location record. But then do you have to run through all the employee records and update them as well? It will be easy to introduce integrity issues where you get two different results by using two different paths. (Where is an employee located? Path 1: Go directly to location , Path 2: Go to Department, then Location). This is a real pain.

If it is indexed correctly, performance shouldn't be an issue.

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