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I'm creating two tables like this:

CREATE TABLE abc (
  id INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
  title VARCHAR(64) NOT NULL,
  created DATETIME DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
  updated DATETIME DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00'
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci;

CREATE TABLE def (
  abc_id INTEGER NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
  name VARCHAR(64) NOT NULL,
  value LONGTEXT,
  PRIMARY KEY(name, abc_id),
  CONSTRAINT fk_def FOREIGN KEY(id)
    REFERENCES abc(id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE RESTRICT
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci;

which should tell mysql to automatically delete the corresponding row from DEF when a row from ABC is deleted.

But this doesn't work well with DROP operations. If I try to drop table abc, I get a error saying a foreign key contraint fails. It appears that I need to drop DEF first, and only then I can drop ABC. I don't understand why, because dropping ABC should automatically drop DEF too, right? Or at least empty it by removing the rows that match the id from ABC...

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, databases don't do this automatically, and for good reason. It's there to prevent you corrupting your database and having invalid foreign keys pointing to non-existent tables. Everything is behaving as expected.

So yes, if you want to drop the tables, you'll need to remove the dependent constraints first. The ON DELETE foreign key clause is for when deleting rows, NOT dropping tables :)

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is there a ON DROP keyword? – Alex Dec 9 '11 at 19:10
    
@Alex, no I'm afraid not. Prior to dropping the table, you can either drop the constraint and drop the table (but that could leave you with data that makes no sense), or delete any matching rows first before doing the DROP. This leaves everything in a consistent state. – Moo-Juice Dec 9 '11 at 19:17
    
If you are trying to drop tables using a script you can also use "SET foreign_key_checks = 0; <drop operations>; SET foreign_key_checks = 1;" – maclema Dec 12 '11 at 22:08

Dropping a table is different than deleting rows, the foreign key constraint will cascade delete operations, but to actually drop (delete) the table, you will need to remove all the foreign key constraints first.

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