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I need to get a line count of a large file (hundreds of thousands of lines) in python. What is the most efficient way both memory- and time-wise?

At the moment I do:

def file_len(fname):
    with open(fname) as f:
        for i, l in enumerate(f):
            pass
    return i + 1

is it possible to do any better?

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24  
use the cores luke. –  Martlark Jul 26 '11 at 6:54
2  
@pico: I am curious... How would you get an approximate answer for this? –  Legend Nov 9 '11 at 9:51
13  
I would add i=-1 before for loop, since this code doesn't work for empty files. –  Maciek Sawicki Dec 27 '11 at 16:13
5  
@Legend: I bet pico is thinking, get the file size (with seek(0,2) or equiv), divide by approximate line length. You could read a few lines at the beginning to guess the average line length. –  Anne Feb 7 '12 at 17:02
7  
enumerate(f, 1) and ditch the i + 1? –  Ian Mackinnon Feb 21 '13 at 12:25

24 Answers 24

up vote 83 down vote accepted

You can't get any better than that.

After all, any solution will have to read the entire file, figure out how many \n you have, and return that result.

Do you have a better way of doing that without reading the entire file? Not sure... The best solution will always be I/O-bound, best you can do is make sure you don't use unnecessary memory, but it looks like you have that covered.

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2  
Exactly, even WC is reading through the file, but in C and it's probably pretty optimized. –  Ólafur Waage May 10 '09 at 10:38
4  
As far as I understand the Python file IO is done through C as well. docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#file-objects –  Tomalak May 10 '09 at 10:41
    
posix_fadvise() might be used stackoverflow.com/questions/860893/… Though I've not noticed any improvement gist.github.com/0ac760859e614cd03652 –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 31 '11 at 9:08
2  
@Tomalak That's a red herring. While python and wc might be issuing the same syscalls, python has opcode dispatch overhead that wc doesn't have. –  bobpoekert Jan 11 '13 at 22:53

One line, probably pretty fast:

num_lines = sum(1 for line in open('myfile.txt'))
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, also works for empty files. –  scai Aug 13 '13 at 16:31
    
How does it work? –  Hernán Eche Sep 18 '13 at 20:17
    
its similar to sum(sequence of 1) every line is counting as 1. >>> [ 1 for line in range(10) ] [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1] >>> sum( 1 for line in range(10) ) 10 >>> –  sapam Dec 13 '13 at 5:22
1  
num_lines = sum(1 for line in open('myfile.txt') if line.rstrip()) for filter empty lines –  Honghe.Wu Mar 3 at 9:26
1  
as we open a file, will this be closed automatically once we iterate over all the elements? Is it required to 'close()'? I think we cannot use 'with open()' in this short statement, right? –  Mannaggia Mar 18 at 15:31

I believe that a memory mapped file will be the fastest solution. I tried four functions: the function posted by the OP (opcount); a simple iteration over the lines in the file (simplecount); readline with a memory-mapped filed (mmap) (mapcount); and the buffer read solution offered by Mykola Kharechko (bufcount).

I ran each function five times, and calculated the average run-time for a 1.2 million-line text file.

Windows XP, Python 2.5, 2GB RAM, 2 GHz AMD processor

Here are my results:

mapcount : 0.465599966049
simplecount : 0.756399965286
bufcount : 0.546800041199
opcount : 0.718600034714

Edit: numbers for Python 2.6:

mapcount : 0.471799945831
simplecount : 0.634400033951
bufcount : 0.468800067902
opcount : 0.602999973297

So the buffer read strategy seems to be the fastest for Windows/Python 2.6

Here is the code:

from __future__ import with_statement
import time
import mmap
import random
from collections import defaultdict

def mapcount(filename):
    f = open(filename, "r+")
    buf = mmap.mmap(f.fileno(), 0)
    lines = 0
    readline = buf.readline
    while readline():
        lines += 1
    return lines

def simplecount(filename):
    lines = 0
    for line in open(filename):
        lines += 1
    return lines

def bufcount(filename):
    f = open(filename)                  
    lines = 0
    buf_size = 1024 * 1024
    read_f = f.read # loop optimization

    buf = read_f(buf_size)
    while buf:
        lines += buf.count('\n')
        buf = read_f(buf_size)

    return lines

def opcount(fname):
    with open(fname) as f:
        for i, l in enumerate(f):
            pass
    return i + 1


counts = defaultdict(list)

for i in range(5):
    for func in [mapcount, simplecount, bufcount, opcount]:
        start_time = time.time()
        assert func("big_file.txt") == 1209138
        counts[func].append(time.time() - start_time)

for key, vals in counts.items():
    print key.__name__, ":", sum(vals) / float(len(vals))
share|improve this answer
    
it's interesting, because I'm seeing different numbers there. What is an actual size of your file in bytes? –  SilentGhost May 12 '09 at 12:25
1  
Sorry, here's a more general reference on memory-mapped files: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory-mapped_file And thanks for the vote. :) –  Ryan Ginstrom May 12 '09 at 14:45
1  
Even though it's just a virtual memory, it is precisely what limits this approach and therefore it won't work for huge files. I've tried it with ~1.2 Gb file with over 10 mln. lines (as obtained with wc -l) and just got a WindowsError: [Error 8] Not enough storage is available to process this command. of course, this is a edge case. –  SilentGhost May 12 '09 at 16:24
4  
+1 for real timing data. Do we know if the buffer size of 1024*1024 is optimal, or is there a better one? –  Kiv Jun 19 '09 at 20:07
13  
It seems that wccount() is the fastest gist.github.com/0ac760859e614cd03652 –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 31 '11 at 8:18

You could execute a subprocess and run wc -l filename

import subprocess

def file_len(fname):
    p = subprocess.Popen(['wc', '-l', fname], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, 
                                              stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
    result, err = p.communicate()
    if p.returncode != 0:
        raise IOError(err)
    return int(result.strip().split()[0])
share|improve this answer
1  
what would be the windows version of this? –  SilentGhost May 10 '09 at 10:30
5  
1  
You can refer to this SO question regarding that. stackoverflow.com/questions/247234/… –  Ólafur Waage May 10 '09 at 10:32
2  
Indeed, in my case (Mac OS X) this takes 0.13s versus 0.5s for counting the number of lines "for x in file(...)" produces, versus 1.0s counting repeated calls to str.find or mmap.find. (The file I used to test this has 1.3 million lines.) –  bendin May 10 '09 at 12:06
1  
No need to involve the shell on that. edited answer and added example code; –  nosklo May 11 '09 at 12:23

Here is a python program to use the multiprocessing library to distribute the line counting across machines/cores. My test improves counting a 20million line file from 26 seconds to 7 seconds using an 8 core windows 64 server. Note: not using memory mapping makes things much slower.

  #LineCount multiprocessing.py
  import multiprocessing, sys, time, os, mmap
  import logging, logging.handlers

  def init_logger(pid):
    console_format = 'P{0} %(levelname)s %(message)s'.format(pid)
    logger = logging.getLogger()  # New logger at root level
    logger.setLevel( logging.INFO )
    logger.handlers.append( logging.StreamHandler() )
    logger.handlers[0].setFormatter( logging.Formatter( console_format, '%d/%m/%y %H:%M:%S' ) )

  def getFileLineCount( queues, pid, processes, file1 ):
    init_logger(pid)
    logging.info( 'start' )

    physical_file = open(file1, "r")
    m1 = mmap.mmap( physical_file.fileno(), 0, None, mmap.ACCESS_READ )

    #work out file size to divide up line counting

    fSize = os.stat(file1).st_size 
    chunk = (fSize / processes) + 1

    lines = 0

    #get where I start and stop
    seekStart = chunk * (pid)
    seekEnd = chunk * (pid+1)
    if seekEnd > fSize:
        seekEnd = fSize

    #find where to start
    if pid > 0:
        m1.seek( seekStart )
        #read next line
        l1 = m1.readline()  # need to use readline with memory mapped files
        seekStart = m1.tell()

    #tell previous rank my seek start to make their seek end

    if pid > 0:
        queues[pid-1].put( seekStart )
    if pid < processes-1:
        seekEnd = queues[pid].get()

    m1.seek( seekStart )    
    l1 = m1.readline()

    while len(l1) > 0:
        lines += 1
        l1 = m1.readline()
        if m1.tell() > seekEnd or len(l1) == 0:
            break

    logging.info( 'done' )
    # add up the results    
    if pid == 0:
        for p in range(1,processes):
            lines += queues[0].get()
        queues[0].put(lines) # the total lines counted
    else:
        queues[0].put(lines)

    m1.close()
    physical_file.close()

  if __name__ == '__main__':
    init_logger( 'main' )
    if len(sys.argv) > 1:
        file_name = sys.argv[1]
    else:
        logging.fatal( 'parameters required: file-name [processes]' )
        exit()

    t = time.time()
    processes = multiprocessing.cpu_count()
    if len(sys.argv) > 2:
        processes = int(sys.argv[2])
    queues=[] # a queue for each process
    for pid in range(processes):
        queues.append( multiprocessing.Queue() )
    jobs=[]
    prev_pipe = 0
    for pid in range(processes):
        p = multiprocessing.Process( target = getFileLineCount, args=(queues, pid, processes, file_name,) )
        p.start()
        jobs.append(p)

    jobs[0].join() #wait for counting to finish
    lines = queues[0].get()

    logging.info( 'finished {} Lines:{}'.format( time.time() - t, lines ) )
share|improve this answer
    
@javadba Thanks! –  Martlark May 21 '13 at 4:17
    
How does this work with files much bigger than main memory? for instance a 20GB file on a system with 4GB RAM and 2 cores –  Brian Minton Sep 23 at 21:18
    
Hard to test now, but I presume it would page the file in and out. –  Martlark Sep 24 at 11:32

I would use Python's file object method readlines, as follows:

with open(input_file) as foo:
    lines = len(foo.readlines())

This opens the file, creates a list of lines in the file, counts the length of the list, saves that to a variable and closes the file again.

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2  
While this is one of the first ways that comes to mind, it probably isn't very memory efficient, especially if counting lines in files up to 10 GB (Like I do), which is a noteworthy disadvantage. –  Time Sheep Apr 17 at 15:36
def file_len(full_path):
  """ Count number of lines in a file."""
  f = open(full_path)
  nr_of_lines = sum(1 for line in f)
  f.close()
  return nr_of_lines
share|improve this answer
4  
This is just syntactic sugar for the solution OP already has –  Yuval Adam May 10 '09 at 10:38
5  
Do you have any timing data to show this is faster? –  Kiv Jun 19 '09 at 20:03

I got a small (4-8%) improvement with this version which re-uses a constant buffer so it should avoid any memory or GC overhead:

lines = 0
buffer = bytearray(2048)
with open(filename) as f:
  while f.readinto(buffer) > 0:
      lines += buffer.count('\n')

You can play around with the buffer size and maybe see a little improvement.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice. To account for files that don't end in \n, add 1 outside of loop if buffer and buffer[-1]!='\n' –  ryuusenshi Nov 14 '13 at 18:37

What about this

def file_len(fname):
  counts = itertools.count()
  with open(fname) as f: 
    for _ in f: counts.next()
  return counts.next()
share|improve this answer

Just to complete the above methods I tried a variant with the fileinput module:

import fileinput as fi   
def filecount(fname):
        for line in fi.input(fname):
            pass
        return fi.lineno()

And passed a 60mil lines file to all the above stated methods:

mapcount : 6.1331050396
simplecount : 4.588793993
opcount : 4.42918205261
filecount : 43.2780818939
bufcount : 0.170812129974

It's a little surprise to me that fileinput is that bad and scales far worse than all the other methods...

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count = max(enumerate(open(filename)))[0]

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This give the count -1 of the true value. –  Borealis Mar 19 at 18:18

As for me this variant will be the fastest:

#!/usr/bin/env python

def main():
    f = open('filename')                  
    lines = 0
    buf_size = 1024 * 1024
    read_f = f.read # loop optimization

    buf = read_f(buf_size)
    while buf:
        lines += buf.count('\n')
        buf = read_f(buf_size)

    print lines

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

reasons: buffering faster than reading line by line and string.count is also very fast

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1  
But is it? At least on OSX/python2.5 the OP's version is still about 10% faster according to timeit.py. –  dF. May 10 '09 at 11:47
    
maybe, i don't test it. –  Mykola Kharechko May 10 '09 at 11:54
    
What if the last line does not end in '\n'? –  tzot May 11 '09 at 13:21
1  
I don't know how you tested it, dF, but on my machine it's ~2.5 times slower than any other option. –  SilentGhost May 11 '09 at 16:25
28  
You state that it will be the fastest and then state that you haven't tested it. Not very scientific eh? :) –  Ólafur Waage May 11 '09 at 18:37

I have modified the buffer case like this:

def CountLines(filename):
    f = open(filename)
    try:
        lines = 1
        buf_size = 1024 * 1024
        read_f = f.read # loop optimization
        buf = read_f(buf_size)

        # Empty file
        if not buf:
            return 0

        while buf:
            lines += buf.count('\n')
            buf = read_f(buf_size)

        return lines
    finally:
        f.close()

Now also empty files and the last line (without \n) are counted.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe also explain (or add in comment in the code) what you changed and what for ;). Might give people some more inside in your code much easier (rather than "parsing" the code in the brain). –  Styxxy Nov 6 '12 at 0:50
print open('file.txt', 'r').read().count("\n") + 1
share|improve this answer

Similarly:

lines = 0
with open(path) as f:
    for line in f:
        lines += 1
share|improve this answer

the result of opening a file is an iterator, which can be converted to a sequence, which has a length:

with open(filename) as f:
   return len(list(f))

this is more concise than your explicit loop, and avoids the enumerate.

share|improve this answer
5  
which means that 100 Mb file will need to be read into the memory. –  SilentGhost May 10 '09 at 11:41
    
yep, good point, although I wonder about the speed (as opposed to memory) difference. It's probably possible to create an iterator that does this, but I think it would be equivalent to your solution. –  Andrew Jaffe May 10 '09 at 11:53
    
this is nasty in terms of memory... –  Yuval Adam May 10 '09 at 17:18
    
Nice idea. I was about to suggest something similar. –  Tony May 15 '09 at 15:46
3  
-1, it's not just the memory, but having to construct the list in memory. –  orip Sep 21 '09 at 21:14

Why not read the first 100 and the last 100 lines and estimate the average line length, then divide the total file size through that numbers? If you don't need a exact value this could work.

share|improve this answer
    
I need a exact value, but the problem is that in general case line length could be fairly different. I'm afraid though that your approach won't be the most efficient one. –  SilentGhost May 10 '09 at 18:50

Why wouldn't the following work?

import sys

# input comes from STDIN
file = sys.stdin
data = file.readlines()

# get total number of lines in file
lines = len(data)

print lines

In this case, the len function uses the input lines as a means of determining the length.

share|improve this answer
4  
The question is not how to get the line count, I've demonstrated in the question itself what I was doing: the question was how to do that efficiently. In your solution the whole file is read into the memory, which is at least inefficient for large files and at most impossible for huge ones. –  SilentGhost Dec 5 '10 at 18:28
2  
Actually it's likely very efficient except when it's impossible. :-) –  kindall Jul 19 '11 at 18:23

How about this?

import fileinput
import sys

counter=0
for line in fileinput.input([sys.argv[1]]):
    counter+=1

fileinput.close()
print counter
share|improve this answer

what about this?

import sys
sys.stdin=open('fname','r')
data=sys.stdin.readlines()
print "counted",len(data),"lines"
share|improve this answer
2  
I don't think it addresses the fact that the large file is being read into the memory. –  SilentGhost Jun 25 '10 at 16:54

How about this one-liner:

file_length = len(open('myfile.txt','r').read().split('\n'))

Takes 0.003 sec using this method to time it on a 3900 line file

def c():
  import time
  s = time.time()
  file_length = len(open('myfile.txt','r').read().split('\n'))
  print time.time() - s
share|improve this answer
def line_count(path):
    count = 0
    with open(path) as lines:
        for count, l in enumerate(lines, start=1):
            pass
    return count
share|improve this answer

If one wants to get the line count cheaply in Python in Linux, I recommend this method:

import os
print os.popen("wc -l file_path").readline().split()[0]

file_path can be both abstract file path or relative path. Hope this may help.

share|improve this answer

Kyle's answer

num_lines = sum(1 for line in open('my_file.txt'))

is probably best, an alternative for this is

num_lines =  len(open('my_file.txt').read().splitlines())

Here is the comparision of performance of both

In [20]: timeit sum(1 for line in open('Charts.ipynb'))
100000 loops, best of 3: 9.79 µs per loop

In [21]: timeit len(open('Charts.ipynb').read().splitlines())
100000 loops, best of 3: 12 µs per loop
share|improve this answer

protected by SilentGhost Nov 3 '12 at 16:49

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