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In Rails guide in http://edgeguides.rubyonrails.org/security.html, section 6.1, it introduces a role for attr_accessible with :as option,

attr_accessible :name, :is_admin, :as => :admin

My question is, if a user log in, where and how can I assign the user to :admin role so she/he gets the right to mass assign with attr_accessible? Also can I define my own role such as group_to_update? If it does, what should go into the definition of group_to_update?

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 30 down vote accepted

You are using some technical terminology in vague ways that is making your understanding of this process muddled, so I'm going to clear up this terminology first.

where and how can I assign the user to :admin role

The 'role' used in the :as parameter to attr_accessible is not a user role. It is an attribute role. It means that attribute is protected from overwriting unless that role is specified in the statement that sets the attribute. So, this system is independent of any user system. Your application doesn't even need to have users to have roles in mass assignment.

can I define my own role such as group_to_update

Roles are not really "defined" in any formal sense at all. In any place that a role is expected, simply use any symbol/string (e.g. :group_to_update) as the role. No need to specify it anywhere else ahead of time.

Here's how it works. Normally, during mass assignment of a hash to model attributes, all of the model's attributes are used as keys to the assigned hash. So if you have a Barn model and barn instance of it, with three attributes horse, cat, and rabbit, then this:

barn.attributes = params

Is essentially the same as doing:

barn.horse = params[:horse]
barn.cat = params[:cat]
barn.rabbit = params[:rabbit]

Now, if you set any attr_accessible on the barn model, only the attributes you set there will be updated when you use mass assignment. Example:

class Barn < ActiveRecord::Base
    attr_accessible :cat
    attr_accessible :rabbit
end

Then this:

barn.attributes = params

Will only do this:

barn.cat = params[:cat]
barn.rabbit = params[:rabbit]

Because only 'cat' and 'rabbit' are set to accessible ('horse' is not). Now consider setting an attribute role like this:

class Barn < ActiveRecord::Base
    attr_accessible :cat
    attr_accessible :rabbit, :as => :banana
end

First, note that the the role can by anything you want as long as it is a symbol/string. In this case, I made the role :banana. Now, when you set a role on an attr_accessible attribute, it normally does not got assigned. This:

barn.attributes = params

Will now only do this:

barn.cat = params[:cat]

But you can assign attributes using a specific role by using the assign_attributes method. So you can do:

barn.assign_attributes(params, :as => :banana)

This will assign all normally-protected params as well as all params protected under the role :banana:

barn.cat = params[:cat]
barn.rabbit = params[:rabbit]

So consider a longer example with more attributes:

class Barn < ActiveRecord::Base
    attr_accessible :cat
    attr_accessible :rabbit, :as => :banana
    attr_accessible :horse, :as => :banana
    attr_accessible :cow, :as => :happiness
end

Then you can use those roles when assigning attributes. This:

barn.assign_attributes(params, :as => :banana)

Corresponds to:

barn.cat = params[:cat]
barn.rabbit = params[:rabbit]
barn.horse = params[:horse]

And this:

barn.assign_attributes(params, :as => :happiness)

Corresponds to:

barn.cat = params[:cat]
barn.cow = params[:cow]

Now, if you choose to, you can make user roles (e.g. a "role" column on your User model) correspond to attribute roles on any model. So you could do something like this:

barn.assign_attributes(params, :as => user.role)

If this user's role happens to be banana, then (using our last model example) it will set attributes on barn for cat, rabbit, and horse. But this is just one way to use attribute roles. It is entirely up to you if you want to use them a different way.

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3  
+1 Great answer. –  Gazler Dec 9 '11 at 20:00
    
Thank you. It is probably the only post going into the great detail about role in attr_accessible. One more question, how the role is going to prevent the mass assignment from happening? Is there no way for a hacker to include the role in the URL? –  user938363 Dec 9 '11 at 20:33
    
Excellent answer. This should be somewhere [in the guides?] in the Rails docs. –  maprihoda Dec 9 '11 at 20:40
    
@user938363, that's up to you. The role is only set when you use :as => whatever_role. It's your responsibility to make sure nothing from the url get used directly in the spot for the role there. Really though, this isn't a big responsibility; you'd have to try to make it happen that way on purpose for it to be at all vulnerable. The attribute role system doesn't even have to be used in a web application at all (see for yourself -- it will work from the rails console command line). –  Ben Lee Dec 9 '11 at 20:42
    
One more question, is there a way role can be used to control how a login user can edit or create new record? –  user938363 Dec 9 '11 at 20:44

This is to protect against mass assignment as your link explains.

In rails (for updating) this only affects the update_attributes call. You can still use update_attribute or admin= methods to assign the admin variable.

User.first.update_attributes(:name => "Gazler", :admin => true) #this will not work
User.first.update_attribute(:admin, true) #This will work

#This will also work
user = User.first
user.admin = true
user.save

You might want to take a look at using a gem for your permissions. Cancan is probably the most common.

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Here you used the individual assignment which should work all the time. But who could be admin role and how to become an admin role? I assume admin is a method which could be defined. –  user938363 Dec 9 '11 at 19:42
    
No, admin in this case would be a property on your User model. You can assign this in the rails console or through a form like any other property. –  Gazler Dec 9 '11 at 19:43

Look at the assign_attributes method.

In short, it enables you to asign the attributes only when you also pass the role. The docs have very nice and easily understandable code examples. In a way, it works like kind of a filter, or guard.

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