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Hi I am reading in a binary file formatted in hex. It is an image file below is a short example of the first few lines of code using hd ... |more command on linux. The image is a binary graphic so the only pixel colours are either black or white. It is a 1024 by 1024 image however the size comes out to be 2097152 bytes

00000000 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 |................|

000dfbf0 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ff 00 ff 00 |................|

000dfc00 ff 00 ff 00 ff 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 |................|

000dfc10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 |................|

This is the code I am using to read it in found in another thread on SO

ifstream file (argv[1], ios::in | ios::binary | ios::ate);
ifstream::pos_type fileSize;
char* fileContents;
if(file.is_open())
{
    fileSize = file.tellg();
    fileContents = new char[fileSize];
    file.seekg(0, ios::beg);
    if(!file.read(fileContents, fileSize))
    {
        cout << "fail to read" << endl;
    }
 file.close();
 cout << fileSize << endl;

The code works however when I run this for loop

for (i=0; i<2097152; i++)
 printf("%hd",fileContents[i]);

The only thing printed out are zeros and no 1s. Why is this are my parameters in printf not correctly specifying the pixel size. I know for a fact that there are 1's in the image representing the white areas. Also how do i figure out how many bytes represent a pixel in this image.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your printf() is wrong. %hd means short, while fileContents[i] is a char; on all modern systems I'm familiar with, this is a size mismatch. Use an array of short instead, since you have twice as many bytes as pixels.

Also, stop using printf() and use std::cout, avoiding all type mismatch problems.

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how will cout know to access 2 bytes at a time and change those into decimal to represent a pixel value of 1 or 0 –  user1084113 Dec 9 '11 at 21:35
    
@user1084113: cout will know because you will pass it a short, not a char. format() takes your word for the size of the value passed, and you were lying to it. –  David Thornley Dec 9 '11 at 21:38
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Since 2097152/1024 is exactly 2048 which is in turn 2*1024, I would assume each pixel is 2 bytes.

The other problem is probably in the printf. I'm not sure what %hd is, I would use %02x myself and cast the data to int.

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