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I have a file like this:

Sed eleifend orci eget odio
consequat. Sed sagittis ipsum
eget pulvinar. Sed ut lacus
Sed luctus sollicitudin ligula
varius neque. Sed tincidunt
Sed mauris egestas eget. Sed
Curae; Sed aliquam enim Sed,
Sed dictum quis sem. Sed
volutpat tincidunt. Sed lacus.

I want to convert it to:

Sed eleifend orci eget odio
consequat. Sed sagittis ipsum
eget pulvinar. Sed Sed ut lacus
Sed luctus sollicitudin ligula
varius neque. Sed tincidunt
Sed Sed mauris egestas eget. Sed
Curae; Sed aliquam enim Sed Sed,
Sed dictum quis sem. Sed
volutpat tincidunt. Sed Sed lacus.
share|improve this question
    
Will the repeated string be always "Sed" or it could be anything that repeats? –  sidyll Dec 9 '11 at 20:31
    
@sidyll just a user chosen string not all repeating strings. –  potong Dec 9 '11 at 20:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A Perl one-liner can achieve this by use of the /e modifier, which allows for logic-based substitution:

$ perl -pi.bak -e 'BEGIN{ $str = "Sed"; } s/(?<=$str)/ ++$cnt % 3 ? "" : " $str" /ge' file.txt

Explanation

  • -pi.bak

    Line-by-line in-place editing of the file. Backup stored in file.txt.bak

  • BEGIN block

    Specify value of $str, executes once only

  • s/PATTERN/REPLACEMENT/ge

    Regex substitution on all matches in $_, line-by-line. REPLACEMENT evaluated as Perl code.

  • (?<=$str)

    Fixed-length look-behind assertion

  • ++$cnt % 3 ? "" : " $str"

    Every third match, append " $str", otherwise append nothing

share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice one. Perhaps $str = shift in the BEGIN block, so you can use an argument instead of "hardcoded" (not that one-liners can be truly hardcoded =P) –  TLP Dec 9 '11 at 21:34
    
I get Can't modify constant item in preincrement (++) at -e line 1, near "cnt %" when I run this. –  potong Dec 11 '11 at 9:52
    
@potong : The $cnt variable had lost its sigil. Try it now –  Zaid Dec 11 '11 at 10:48

You can do that using awk as well.

awk -v s=Sed '{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) {if($i ~ s)cnt++; if(cnt==3) {cnt=0; printf("%s ", s)} printf("%s ", $i)} printf("\n")}' file.txt

OUTPUT

Sed eleifend orci eget odio 
consequat. Sed sagittis ipsum 
eget pulvinar. Sed Sed ut lacus 
Sed luctus sollicitudin ligula 
varius neque. Sed tincidunt 
Sed Sed mauris egestas eget. Sed 
Curae; Sed aliquam enim Sed Sed, 
Sed dictum quis sem. Sed 
volutpat tincidunt. Sed Sed lacus.
share|improve this answer
    
This appears to work but please explain. –  potong Dec 11 '11 at 10:30
    
This is a good simply answer and if it could be improved not to interrogate every token of the file would get my vote. –  potong Dec 12 '11 at 7:29

This script will take an argument as the word to multiply. Stripping punctuation will make the count accurate, and avoid repeated punctuation or newlines. I've preserved the original string as completely as possible.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $replace = shift || "";
my @all;
my %count;
while (<DATA>) {
    for (split / +/) {
        my $word = s/[^A-Za-z'-]+//gr;
        $count{$word}++;
        if (lc $word eq lc $replace && (($count{$word} % 3) == 0)) {
            push @all, $word;
        }
        push @all, $_;
    }
}

print "@all" =~ s/\n /\n/gr;

__DATA__
Sed eleifend orci eget odio
consequat. Sed sagittis ipsum
eget pulvinar. Sed ut lacus
Sed luctus sollicitudin ligula
varius neque. Sed tincidunt
Sed mauris egestas eget. Sed
Curae; Sed aliquam enim Sed,
Sed dictum quis sem. Sed
volutpat tincidunt. Sed lacus.

Output:

Sed eleifend orci eget odio
consequat. Sed sagittis ipsum
eget pulvinar. Sed Sed ut lacus
Sed luctus sollicitudin ligula
varius neque. Sed tincidunt
Sed Sed mauris egestas eget. Sed
Curae; Sed aliquam enim Sed Sed,
Sed dictum quis sem. Sed
volutpat tincidunt. Sed Sed lacus.
share|improve this answer
    
A couple of issues: my $word = s/...//gr; should be my $word = $_ =~ s/...//gr; and this won't preserve multiple whitespaces (split /( +)/ will but then you need to print join '', @all;) –  Zaid Dec 9 '11 at 21:19
    
@Zaid my $word = s/...//gr means my $word = $_ =~ s/...//gr, since the usage of $_ is implicit. Good idea about the spaces, however, then we'd need to check to make sure it's not counting spaces in the hash. –  TLP Dec 9 '11 at 21:31

After seeing your comment saying "just a user chosen string not all repeating strings":

import re
g = 0

def double_third(fname, st):
    def smart_replace(m):
        global g
        g += 1
        if g % 3 == 0:
            return "%s %s" % (st, st)
        else:
            return st

    with open(fname) as f:
        print re.sub(st, smart_replace, f.read())

double_third('file.txt', 'Sed')
share|improve this answer

This might work for you:

sed ':a;$!{N;ba};s/\<Sed\>/\x00/g;s/\(\x00\)[^\x00]*\1[^\x00]*\1/& \1/g;s/\x00/Sed/g' file

Explanation:

  1. Slurp file into the pattern space.
  2. At end-of-file globally replace the chosen string with an unlikely character.
  3. Globally replace every string in which the unlikely character occurs three times by its self at the same time appending the unlikely character.
  4. Globally replace the unlikely character by the chosen string.
share|improve this answer
s/(\bSed\b.*?\bSed\b.*?\bSed\b)/$1 Sed/gsm
share|improve this answer
    
Needs /s modifier for this data. –  TLP Dec 9 '11 at 22:31
    
I'm not sure what command this substitution goes with. –  potong Dec 11 '11 at 10:27
    
This is a sed command. –  phs Jul 28 '12 at 19:34

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